Factory Five Racing Forum banner
1 - 20 of 67 Posts

·
Senior Charter Member
Joined
·
1,668 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Reading about the failures, Kinda scary! From what I've read it seem as though the breaks occur where the threads start. What about a Deep Jam nut that had a sleeve about a half inch long that slid over the shaft after the threads??? Would it take some of the load away from the scored shaft? Man,.. I wish I won those Konis!!!!!
 

·
Senior Charter Member
Joined
·
1,668 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I just called my friend that works @ a Machine shop. He's going to make some for me. Hopefully I never find out if they work or not. Anyone want a set?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,817 Posts
I think the trick is just to remember to screw the jamb nut down against the rod end, as opposed to screwing the rod end up against the jamb nut. Plenty of people are running these units without issue.

[ June 13, 2007, 11:03 AM: Message edited by: turboguy ]
 

·
Junior Charter Member
Joined
·
213 Posts
I would be interested in a set.
 

·
Junior Charter Member
Joined
·
1,053 Posts
I would like a set please... I don't
really want to spend for new shocks
right now since I have 2 in College..
Glad I got the kit while they were in
Highschool


Thanks,

Dan
 

·
FFR 4331
Joined
·
1,114 Posts
Please add me to the list.
 

·
Junior Charter Member
Joined
·
1,300 Posts
Sounds like a great idea. I too would be very interested in a set. Keep me( us) posted. Thanks.
Baron
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
2,746 Posts
Me too. Just let me know who to send the check to.

Chris.
 

·
Senior Charter Member
Joined
·
1,668 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
My machinist make house calls, He'll have one for me Friday. I'll bring it to the Open House for a little touchy feely.
 

·
section 8
Joined
·
5,136 Posts
I've got the bilsteins with 500 miles them and emailed FFR to see if I could send them in on a trade , because I'm scared of them breaking. I also asked if we could contact Bilstein to see if they would take them back due to the used?! condition, as well as the most current install instructions and their guarantee they the Bilsteins would last 50k miles of normal ? street driving . There has been no reply as of yet. Kind of makes me wonder (scared).I use bilsteins in my other vehicles and find them to be a superior product to all generic replacement shocks .Both Ford and GM use them in their "better" vehicles . I can't make the open house , so add me to the list. Thanks, Bob
 

·
just another builder
Joined
·
8,238 Posts
Not to be a nay sayer...but i'm not convinced they would make a difference.
 

·
Senior Charter Member
Joined
·
1,668 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
What is the reasoning for your doubt? The more I've been thinking about it, the more I'm convinced it will work. If we can move the stress point from the weakest point on the shaft it would be less likely to break. I did a little experiment. I scored an acrylic shaft with a pipe cutter, always breaks on the score. then I put a metal sleeve over the score. the shaft wouldn't break. I did this to try to figure out the length the sleeve. I'm going with a 5/8 length that seems like more than enough to isolate the score from the force. Look how small the shaft is between the shaft and the threads.
 

·
Senior Charter Member
Joined
·
1,668 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Any engineers out there??? I had giant Keg parties in college. Although I did engineer some very creative ways to hide the Kegs from the 5.0.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
554 Posts
Hoofa, I think your idea will work as long as the failures occur because of bending stresses. Make sure your sleeve nuts are really tight to the shafts. I took the $ approach and just received 2 new front Konis on sale nfrom FFR. The shafts measure .545" in diameter and appear to be marginally stronger than the Bilsteins.
Also, the new springs are 7.5 coils so no chance for coil bind at all. The hats are secured to the upper mount with spring steel keepers, but the springs still have to wire tied to the hats. I won't use plastic zip ties!
 

·
just another builder
Joined
·
8,238 Posts
The stress risers won't be relocated...if in fact it is due to the cut in threads or stretching of it from tightening.
The root cause of the failure has yet to be identified in my mind anyway
your sleeve may help if clearances are extremely tight and if the shock arm has to go under some deflection before it snaps...the sleeve will limit the deflection ...maybe or transfere the load back to the weak link, but the highly stressed area where it breaks (or has been breaking) will still be there....it really depends on what is actually causing the shock to fail in the first place... nobody has really let that cat out of the bag yet...to my satisfaction anyway
go a head and try it..it can't hurt, i'm just not convinced it will help either
 

·
Junior Charter Member
Joined
·
1,524 Posts
It depends upon the mode of failure. I looked at the pictures that 289FIA_Cobra posted and I am afraid that the failure might be due to torsional stresses, however it is very hard to tell from the picture. If this is the case the sleeve will not work. If the failure is due to shear stress then the sleeve will transfer the point of peak stress concentration from the end of the threads to the point where the sleeve ends. This should be a stronger portion of the shaft and I believe will reduce breaks.

The key will be to determine the failure mechanism. To do this we need to look carefully at a number of the broken ends. Are there high res pictures available or can anyone bring examples to the open house?

My fracture mechanics is pretty rusty, but I will try to do some more research tonight.

Todd
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
554 Posts
Hoofa, I forgot to add that when you mount shocks, mount the body to suspension arm and the stem to the chassis. When I was assembling my kit three years ago, there was no question in my mind how to orient the shocks. 45 years of experience playing with cars and I never saw a shock mounted upside down except on track-only race cars. Call it common sense or whatever, but car manufacturers know how to mount shocks, and they always mount he body of the shock to the high stress, high impact, suspension end. This goes for McPherson struts also, which is more similar to our coil-over setup. The suspension end of the shock accelerates up and down and laterally, so more stress is on that end. The stem end is the weakest part of the shock, and the stress is greatest where the threads end on the shaft, so thats where it lets go if you mount them upside down.

That's my 1 cents worth! When my shock breaks, I'll disavow all knowledge of this post.
John S.
 
1 - 20 of 67 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top