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That is sometimes the case. The disadvantage to having a single flex hose in the center and hard lines running to the calipers, is the calipers can't be removed without disconnecting the hard lines and later bleeding the system. It also requires clamping the lines along the length of the axle housing and a tricky bend at the caliper.

I would always use a flex line at each caliper.
Good point, yes, thanks. I should have been clearer - hardline *almost* to the caliper, but a flex line to enable maintenance.
 

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Discussion Starter #63
As Dave mentioned the flex lines make maintenance on things like pads, rotors, axles, seals, etc... way easier. It would be a pain in the ass to have to bleed them anytime you need to move the calliper. I think the best option is how is similar to how I did it. Use the tee in the hardline kit and run the hardline along the frame but cut and flare the line so you don't have to loop it on that passenger side like it says in the manual. The universal flex lines and banjo bolts were pretty cheap so why not?
 

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hey hoser - now that you got the rear end all shiny and painted and reinstalled, you might want to check this out:

http://www.breezeautomotive.com/images/pdf/3-Link-Banana-Bracket-Installation.pdf

though I can't quite put my finger on it, there is something about your mannerisms that leads me to believe you are the kind of guy who likes to engage in high rpm clutch drops on occasion.....:thumbup:

keep up the great vids - can't wait to see the test drives
 

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Discussion Starter #65
hey hoser - now that you got the rear end all shiny and painted and reinstalled, you might want to check this out:

http://www.breezeautomotive.com/images/pdf/3-Link-Banana-Bracket-Installation.pdf

though I can't quite put my finger on it, there is something about your mannerisms that leads me to believe you are the kind of guy who likes to engage in high rpm clutch drops on occasion.....:thumbup:

keep up the great vids - can't wait to see the test drives

You're right buddy! I do love spinning the tires!
That is some great info, I had no idea the OD of the shaft changed. I am planning to eventually weld the axle tubes to the centre section and put some 9" ends on the 8.8. Welding the three link bracket then would probably be my best bet.

I have read a few times on here that the 3-link will fail if launched hard in these cars. Is this the common point of failure? I would love to see some pictures if anyone has some!

You and me both buddy, can't wait to drive this deathtrap! :grin2:
 

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I would never run a hard line along the rear axle either. This was common with drum brakes.
Why not? As long as there are flexible hoses between the axle and the frame and the axle and the brake why would this be an issue?

Robert
 

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Discussion Starter #67
Why not? As long as there are flexible hoses between the axle and the frame and the axle and the brake why would this be an issue?

Robert
A general rule of thumb I like to use for plumbing is to have as few possible connections as possible. Having three flex lines and extra hard lines just ads complexity and more possible points for the system to leak or fail.

Just my two cents..
 

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I agree, every connection is a potential leak! But why use flexible hose on the frame?

flexible hoses ballon when pressure is applied to you loose braking efficiency. This is much less than in hard lines

Just wondering...
 

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Why not? As long as there are flexible hoses between the axle and the frame and the axle and the brake why would this be an issue?

Robert
For one thing it looks ugly and you have to figure out some way to anchor the brake lines along the axle tubes, including brackets to hold the transition fitting from hard line to flex hose. You also end up with three flex hoses instead of two. Use the least amount of flex hose you can.

Here's a video of the installation of some brake lines that can be purchased for my car. This SS brake line kit costs about $600. I'd toss all but the lines between the front wheels. These dummies used both 1/4 and 3/16 lines, which was not necessary, and a distribution block that was not needed. They also used steel tube nuts on stainless steel lines.

 

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Discussion Starter #70
I agree, every connection is a potential leak! But why use flexible hose on the frame?

flexible hoses ballon when pressure is applied to you loose braking efficiency. This is much less than in hard lines

Just wondering...
The only area I used flex lines are from the bulk heads on the frame to the callipers. Everything else is hardline. These flex lines are stainless braided hose and only 14" long so the effect on braking efficiency would be negligible.
 

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I think we all agree, hardline were-ever possible with the least amount of flex line and connections....

RJ
 

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Discussion Starter #73
I think we all agree, hardline were-ever possible with the least amount of flex line and connections....

RJ
Yes, that would be best. I think you might have thought where i teed off and ran to the passenger side along the frame that I used a flex line. It's actually a hardline, sorry the video may not have been very clear haha.
 

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You've got lots of room in front of the engine for an intake snorkel, compared to a real '33 or a car like my '37 Oze, where the engine is not set as far back. A silicone 90 cut as short as possible on my car touches the electric fan housing. What you don't have is much vertical height, like a real '33 would have.

More modern LS engines now use a blade-type MAF sensor that requires it to be mounted in the middle of a 6" length of 4" diameter straight tube. It's a 5 pin sensor that includes the intake air temperature sensor. So far, I haven't seen anyone manage to make a snorkel for this style of MAF sensor that fits under the hood and inside the hood sides, without using a tube that appears to be shorter than 6".


I think your setup will work, but you may need a shield for air filter.
 

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Discussion Starter #77
You've got lots of room in front of the engine for an intake snorkel, compared to a real '33 or a car like my '37 Oze, where the engine is not set as far back. A silicone 90 cut as short as possible on my car touches the electric fan housing. What you don't have is much vertical height, like a real '33 would have.

More modern LS engines now use a blade-type MAF sensor that requires it to be mounted in the middle of a 6" length of 4" straight tube. It's a 5 pin sensor that includes the intake air temperature sensor. So far, I haven't seen anyone manage to make a snorkel for this style of MAF sensor that fits under the hood and inside the hood sides, without using a tube that appears to be shorter than 6".


I think your setup will work, but you may need a shield for air filter.

Luckily I have the old style Maf so I don't think the short 90 will be too much of an issue (the stock coupler that came off the Camaro is 6" long). I don't see a way you would be able to fit that much straight tube in front of an LS inside all the stock body panels. I will probably end up building a heat shield eventually so it is sucking in cold air from the side of the engine bay (I'm not going to run engine side covers) instead of heated air from behind the rad. I will probably also build some type of support for the intake so there is no chance it can vibrate and hit a belt or anything else. I really need to buy a sheet metal brake!
 

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This works for me. Minimum distance on engine side and almost on inlet side (tube extends into filter a little. No error codes and plenty of power - a 2012 E-rod LS3 crate engine.
 

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Luckily I have the old style Maf so I don't think the short 90 will be too much of an issue (the stock coupler that came off the Camaro is 6" long). I don't see a way you would be able to fit that much straight tube in front of an LS inside all the stock body panels. I will probably end up building a heat shield eventually so it is sucking in cold air from the side of the engine bay (I'm not going to run engine side covers) instead of heated air from behind the rad. I will probably also build some type of support for the intake so there is no chance it can vibrate and hit a belt or anything else. I really need to buy a sheet metal brake!
I used two 90's a 6" section and a 4" section to route my air-cleaner to the driver side and built a small "air-box" to keep some of the radiator heat out. It fits inside the hood sides if I run them. I'll post a pic if I can find one.
 

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Glad I found this thread, first saw your thread on the Factory Five Forum(until it got locked) and started following you on YouTube, but it's nice to have a thread like this for a little more in depth discussion. Keep up the great work!
 
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