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I strongly advise you to reconsider and use the proprietary spindles from Factory Five. Much better geometry for steering axis, camber curve and bump steer. You're dumping a ton of cash into this build; don't shortcut here. If you intend to use the 6 piston PP calipers you'll have to do some fabrication for either the SN95 or FFR spindles.

Jeff
X2. Said the same thing in an earlier post. I've had and driven both. The difference is significant and I'm always a little disappointed to see builds that don't use the FF 2-piece spindles. There was a time that making the donor spindles work was the only option. No more. Find some savings somewhere and make it happen.
 

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Do you recall the spec on the Driveshaft I would use with the TKO600? Or is that something I am going to have to measure myself once the Engine is mounted? Im leaning TKO600, and I assume that a Tremec shop locally would have the correct bellhousing to mate the Coyote to the Tranny. I guess I'll find out when I visit the local Tremec shop.
My Coyote/TKO/IRS Mk4 Roadster build has a 10.625" 31 spline driveshaft from Factory Five. Fit perfectly. I assume you're aware the 2015+ IRS diff requires an adapter. Factory Five provides those as well.

Also, I see that Wilwoods are the favorite, and I like the separate E-brake Caliper, but that's not the direction I am going. What's the thoughts on a Hydraulic E-brake Valve? I see Breeze offers one, and that seems intriguing as an alternative. I think the Factory Brakes use an integrated e-brake on the rear rotors, and a Hydraulic Brake Valve would operate basically the same way.
Whether you can go all hydraulic may/may not be a regulatory issue. Depends on your locality, technical requirements, inspection, etc. Calipers with an integral e-brake are typically mechanically actuated. So is the separate caliper on the Wilwood brakes.
 

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Discussion Starter #43
I appreciate and respect the advice from the veterans, thank you for the input to date. Keep it coming.


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Discussion Starter #44
My Coyote/TKO/IRS Mk4 Roadster build has a 10.625" 31 spline driveshaft from Factory Five. Fit perfectly. I assume you're aware the 2015+ IRS diff requires an adapter. Factory Five provides those as well.







Whether you can go all hydrualic may/may not be a regulatory issue. Depends on your locality, technical requirements, inspection, etc. Calipers with an integral e-brake are typically mechanically actuated. So is the separate caliper on the Wilwood brakes.


I have the Adaptor Plate in the garage right now, just waiting on wheels or brakes to be mounted before I install that.

On the Hydraulic E-brake, I’ll check with WA state on the regs for mech vs hydr. Better make a choice that will stay in Compliance. That aside, would you put hydraulic e-brakes on your Roadster?


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Discussion Starter #45
So the engine is complete ... for now. The parts I am short will probably come in the kit; the parts to bypass the Coolant Tubes that normally go to the heater core, the intake hose to connect the Cold Air Intake to the Intake Manifold and the Oil Filter relocation parts. The engine will go under the sheet until the kit and/or the transmission get here.






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Discussion Starter #46
Opting to go with Stewart Transportation was a wise choice. They have communicated at each step; when the car was picked up from the Factory, when the car was about 3 days out (in the Midwest), when Warren was in Walla Walla about 1 day out to discuss proposed time of arrival. Then, day of arrival, with excitement building, I get the call that he is about 35 minutes out. Right on schedule. Good thing I have the flexibility to leave whenever I need to....




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Discussion Starter #47
Delivery Day! Smooth offload of 17 boxes, 4 rims and a frame with body mounted! Warren was smooth and professional, and offloaded in no time. He took great care to make sure everything was done carefully and completely. Excited to unpack! Too many exclamation points? This is like Christmas, except you have to unpack 17 boxes and double-check all the contents.......

Pictures of the offload and the kit sitting safely in the garage. It was a nice day, thank God.




















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Discussion Starter #48
When I ordered the kit, I opted for the non-powder-coated frame, and in retrospect I might change that decision. I don’t want an unprotected frame rusting in the elements (even though this is a ‘sunny days only’ car. Instead of powder-coating, I am cleaning and treating the frame and then using POR-15 rust-proof paint to protect the frame and blend it with the black undercoat I will be using on the underside of the body. For practice, I am going to start on the Rear Differential. Pulling it out of a Mustang with miles on it has left a patina of rust and some grease on the Diff, and so I cleaned it with some Industrial Cleaner and used the wire wheel on the angle grinder to remove the surface rust. No matter how POR-15 claims you can paint right over rust, I am still removing everything I can. Following wire wheel, I dust the Differential off, and tape off the parts I won’t be painting. Due to the temperature being lower than recommended range, I am leaving the paint to cure for longer than the recommended time. Then I will remove the masking tape and hit the rear cover with the wire wheel before spraying the whole thing with clear Engine Paint by Dupli-Color. I will say, POR-15 is very thin, and a little goes a long way. The paint itself is a beautiful thing, almost self-leveling.... it covers a multitude of brushing sins. Just don’t skimp on the prep. I am using less than half of a 4-ounce can for 2 coats on the whole differential.













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Discussion Starter #49
Did I mention what a great workbench you can make out of two stacked pieces of plywood on top of 3 boxes on edge? :)


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I just looked back at one of the previous posts and saw that you got the performance pack donor car with the Torsen and 3.73. I found a GT350 rear suspension for my donor parts that also has the torsen and 3.73 but I opted to relocate the guts into an aluminum case. I was able to pick up a 3.15 ratio aluminum differential from the junk yard for $150 and swapped the internals. Obviously there is some time investment, but I didn't think the $150 was too bad for a 21 lbs weight save. I know some might say the aluminum case has risk of breaking but I think in such a light car, if I don't go around dumping the clutch all of the time, the risk of breaking the mounting ears is low.

I also have a chance still to sell the cast iron 3.15 and make some money back. Although, I don't think it's a very desirable ratio for someone to swap to.
 

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...the Oil Filter relocation parts...
Unless you're doing something unusual, a Coyote fits in the Roadster frame without an oil filter relocation setup. It's just something else to leak and adds unneeded complexity. Numerous choices for oil filters that fit into the available space. I'm assuming you removed the OE oil cooler from the block. It's not needed either and won't fit anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #52
Reading the manual I see the first build steps are actually disassembly. First you have to remove the Body. Reading the forums, many people build a body buck for storage of the body while they are building, usually on-site. Since I have a small two-car garage, the only storage direction for me would be up, above the frame. I don’t really like that idea, just because of the possible repercussions if it should happen to fall. No, I’m more comfortable with it on a buck or on the ground. I take the body off with the help of my wife and two younger kids, and we load it onto the bed of my pickup. F450 pickups have large long beds. We put the body in a storage unit, safe and sound until I’m ready for it.
















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Discussion Starter #53
Unless you're doing something unusual, a Coyote fits in the Roadster frame without an oil filter relocation setup. It's just something else to leak and adds unneeded complexity. Numerous choices for oil filters that fit into the available space. I'm assuming you removed the OI oil cooler from the block. It's not needed either and won't fit anyway.


I did remove the old oil cooler. It was too bent to use, dirty, and useless, so I already took it off. I haven’t made up my mind on the final solution, and I don’t feel the pressure to make up my mind yet, as it will be a little while before the Coyote goes in.


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Discussion Starter #54
Following removal of the body, there are quite a few aluminum body panels that are mounted to the body and each other by 1/4” hex head self-tapping screws, approximately two per edge. These are the aluminum panels that are too large or inefficient to ship separately from the frame. Time to take these off and get down to the body, so that I can prep for body paint.












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Discussion Starter #55
The frame painting process is a 3-step process starting with Industrial-strength cleaner, then spraying on Metal Prep Treatment, and then painting POR-15 Gloss Black rust preventative coating on the frame. I’m sure some will disagree with this choice, but with the care that has to be taken with powder-coated paint on metal, I feel POR-15 will be tougher and thicker with less vulnerability to chipping or cracking, if done right. Time will tell.
This is where having a family comes in handy. My three children (22,18, and 16) and I are able to move the frame out to the driveway where we put it up on jack stands. After strategically placing the jack stands to minimize the area the jack stands would interfere with the treatment, we rinse the frame down. The temperature outside was about 40 degrees at 3PM, with overcast and no sun, typical Northwest weather in the middle of the winter doldrums. The industrial cleaner takes 3 spray bottles-worth of water/cleaner mix to completely wash the frame down, and I used the whole bottle of Metal Prep rather quickly. I should have had another bottle of it, but I am able to coat the whole frame with the Metal Prep and keep it relatively wet for about 20 minutes. Follow that up with a rinse, and we put some gloves on and move the frame back into the garage to dry off. The Metal Prep chemical is some nasty stuff, and you don’t want to get it on your hands or in your eyes. Using my freestanding propane jet heater, the frame dried off in less than an hour. By now it’s 7 PM, and with the recommendation of the POR-15 folks to have the frame bone-dry when you paint it, I decide to wait for tomorrow to start painting. Tough decision, as the suspension is calling my name and I’m itching to get moving on it. The darker pictures are before the cleaning and coating and you can see in the later pictures that the coating looks like a white stain.












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Discussion Starter #56 (Edited)
The first coat took about 8 hours, and I’m not sure if I was being too careful or if I’m getting slower. POR-15 is a great paint, and it coats very well when the surface is prepped properly. I didn’t have quite enough metal prep to keep the metal wet for a full 1/2 hour per the instructions, but the coating came out just fine. After letting it dry in the garage and turning the floor jet heater on a few times, it was plenty dry and warm to put the first coat on. After the first coat, life circumstances dictated that I let the first coat cure. So this Saturday my daughter and I scuff the first coat per the directions, and then give it a second coat. This is where the uncertainty about my efficiency comes in. By myself it took me 8 hours, and I missed a few spots. With my daughter the second coat took about 3 and a half hours and it didn’t seem that she was moving faster than me. Regardless, the second coat is finished and I feel good about the coating. I am not sure about the efficiency of my choice, if it was just made on efficiency alone, I think the powder coating would have been a deal at $495. It would be hard to pay me to paint a frame for someone else for that price. My inexperienced opinion is that this coating will be better long-term, but only time will tell how happy I am with it.

Note the jack stand locations I chose to support the frame while painting it. The 2x3 frame member penetrates the 4” frame tube at the rear end of the tube and exits out the bottom, which creates an straight edge that minimizes the surface area the jack stand interferes with. Using a piece of pipe crossways through the front frame ear holes means the only surface area interferes with are the top insides of the two frame ear holes. I’ll catch these two tiny areas later when the build achieves ‘Roller’ status.












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Discussion Starter #57
Unless you're doing something unusual, a Coyote fits in the Roadster frame without an oil filter relocation setup. It's just something else to leak and adds unneeded complexity. Numerous choices for oil filters that fit into the available space. I'm assuming you removed the OI oil cooler from the block. It's not needed either and won't fit anyway.


Edward... no ill effects from eliminating the oil cooling? Did I read that you installed an oil temp gauge in your build, or was that another builder? How does the oil run temp-wise without the additional cooling?


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Discussion Starter #58
I just looked back at one of the previous posts and saw that you got the performance pack donor car with the Torsen and 3.73. I found a GT350 rear suspension for my donor parts that also has the torsen and 3.73 but I opted to relocate the guts into an aluminum case. I was able to pick up a 3.15 ratio aluminum differential from the junk yard for $150 and swapped the internals. Obviously there is some time investment, but I didn't think the $150 was too bad for a 21 lbs weight save. I know some might say the aluminum case has risk of breaking but I think in such a light car, if I don't go around dumping the clutch all of the time, the risk of breaking the mounting ears is low.



I also have a chance still to sell the cast iron 3.15 and make some money back. Although, I don't think it's a very desirable ratio for someone to swap to.


Matthew, did the Gear ratio impact your choice of transmission? I’m still in the decision phase with the tranny.


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Discussion Starter #59
While the second coat cures, we take the time to prep the rear spindles, or knuckles, for future installation. First step is removing the Wheel Hubs. In the process of removing those, it becomes apparent that while one of the hubs is nice and tight, the other must have a bearing on its way to going out, as there is a little inward-outward play in the bearing. About an 8th of an inch, which for me is outside reasonable tolerance. This is a high-powered vehicle that I will test the limits of.... someone could be hurt or killed. Tasca Parts website for two new hubs; no use replacing one without the other. ‘Only’ $112 each...........
Per the F5 instructions we trim an ear from the appropriate arms, then use the grinding wheel to bring the trimmed surface back to smooth and even, with a rounded edge. This is where having a band saw comes in handy. Then the wire wheel cleans the patina and junk off the surface, and we are ready to give it a nice gloss with some Dupli-Color Clear Engine Paint. Two Light coats followed by a Medium wet coat per the instructions.

Nice and shiny when done.
























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Edward... no ill effects from eliminating the oil cooling? Did I read that you installed an oil temp gauge in your build, or was that another builder? How does the oil run temp-wise without the additional cooling?
First of all, not eliminating the OE oil cooler isn't an option because it won't fit. It needs to be removed and the long filter adapter replaced with a short one. Ford part number AL3Z-6890-A. Then a regular oil filter spins directly onto the block. Some have installed an oil cooler in the original Cobra location below the radiator opening. But many times not plumbed (or at least with a thermostatic shutoff) because the Coyote in general is a cool running engine. Unless you're building a track car, where things typically get a lot more exotic with dry sump etc., nothing special is required for the Coyote installation. Two seasons driving mine with on oil filter on the block and nothing else and I watch the gauges carefully. It rarely gets above 200 degrees water temp. Includes hot weather, stop and go, etc. I don't have an oil temp gauge on mine. I do watch the water temp closely, and if you stream data from the ODB2 port, you can also monitor cylinder head temp. BTW, if you do decide to use a remote oil filter setup, by itself or with a remote oil cooler, be very careful. There was a builder on here a couple years ago that had the wrong oil filter adapter on his Coyote and cooked the engine in about two minutes of running. Yes, it happens.
 
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