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Discussion Starter #321 (Edited)
Finishing up the wiring routing for the fuel pressure sender. The three-conductor cable is about 6 feet long. Too long for the distance travelled to the dash, but for now I’m just getting it out of the engine compartment.



Simple wrap in convolute and tape, and pop through the firewall, and it’s cleaned up. The engine cover will hide most of it anyway.



The rest I’ll take care of with other work behind the dash.


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Melbourne has changed so much in the last 10 years. Little old Adelaide, where I live, not so much. It is definitely worth the trip. Of course if you're going to Melbourne, you might as well slide on over to Adelaide and I can take you for a tour in one of the few FFRs in South Australia.

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Discussion Starter #323 (Edited)
I’ve skipped over Power Steering in order to address it all at once. And when it comes to my power steering system design, my tendency to innovate has again bowed to convention.
I planned to implement a design where I would use the third reservoir on my Triple CNC Reservoir to feed to a Tee near the pump inlet which would then continue on to the Inlet of the Pump. The output from the pump would connect to the rack as typical, then return through a 10” cooler and finally connect to the Tee to form a hydraulic loop. This would allow the fluid tank to act as a reservoir to compensate for any draw or pressure from the loop.
I realized the big issue with this design was going to be air. This design would create an elevated part of the system at the pump and this would result in the pump either airlocked or subject to air collection (formation of an air pocket) during operation. Big flaw in my brilliant plans. That’s the issue with ‘Bright Idea Brain’, often ideas have flaws.
Back to the drawing board. So I already have the KRC Coyote Power Steering kit, I just have to figure out what to do in the Reservoir department. Parts that I already have; KRC Coyote Bracket, Elite Series pump with pulley, Replacement Water Pump Pulley, belt, Fluid Cooler, and Power Steering fitting group from Breeze with Black Stainless tube substituted for the Silver.



I don’t like the idea of adding a reservoir when I already have one I’m not using. I also know the fewer fittings, the better, at least when it comes to leaks. This points me toward a Tank-mounted reservoir. KRC’s website is great for displaying the plethora of products they offer for the different engines, etc, but matching their own parts to each other is a little challenging, at least for me. I decided to order the KRC 9145000 bolt-on tank and go with a standard design for the piping; pump to rack, rack to cooler, cooler to tank. I like the bolt-on tank for its keep-it simple design, small footprint and elimination of at least 2 fittings. I received the tank in short order, and it’s time to get to work.

First is mounting the bracket for the pump. The assembly instructions from KRC are well documented and easy to understand and the process goes fairly quickly. Three bolts through three pins in 3 bolt holes. I did run into an issue with the bolt closest to the intake bottoming out against the block. Possible solutions would be a shorter bolt or somehow spacing the bolt out slightly. I opt to install two leftover small flat washers in between the bracket and the bolt head. Blue loctite on these bolts and the bracket is in place.

Before bracket.



After bracket.



Now to temp-mount the pump. Two bolts and the pump sits in place.



With the components in place, I’ll temp the fittings in and then cut and install the tubing.

First, the fittings on the PS rack. Fit is tight, and routing seems like it can only happen one way.



Thinking about the hose routing and wanting to avoid the hoses contacting the metal parts around them. I route them with the gentlest bends and try to keep the hoses in tension with each other as they run by each other.

The hoses will eventually form a T-shape as they run through the frame members and connect the components.

The in-line cooler under the radiator will send the fluid back to the reservoir.



I’m not going to finalize the lines and fittings until I get the reservoir.

We go ahead and install the water pump replacement pulley. It goes right in and the belt installs back in the same way the old one did.





Checking to see if the coolant hoses will interfere with the pulleys, I slide the belt on and temporarily tighten the PS pump into place. Clicking the upper coolant hose into place I see there is less than a 1/4” clearance where the hose crosses in front of the PS Pump Pulley and where the fitting crosses in from of the Water Pump pulley.





Too tight for my liking.

I do remember from replacing the Thermostat housing bolts that where the Thermostat housing attaches to the engine there is some flexibility to that mount. (The radiator hose connects to that housing. You can see the thermostat housing in the earlier picture of the front of the engine.) I loosen the thermostat mounting bolt slightly and shift the thermostat housing toward the driver side of the vehicle and tighten the bolts back up. This looks better for clearance.

Note that I made this adjustment BEFORE I filled the system with coolant.





To Be continued.......





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Discussion Starter #324 (Edited)
One quick note, when installing the KRC Coyote bracket, the two inner bolts bottom out against the block just slightly before cinching the bracket tight. No mention of this in the install instructions. I want to make sure the bracket sits tight against the spacer collars, so to remedy this I used a couple of washers on the outside of the bracket under the bolt heads. I only added enough washers to ensure the bracket was completely tight before the bolt bottoms out. Blue Loctite to make sure they don’t back out.



This seems like it’s going to be the trouble-solving post. So be it.

Next I go to install the Fluid Reservoir. I went with a Bolt-on KRC reservoir that bolts right onto the pump.

The easiest way to install the tank is to pull the pump off, and mount it on the bench. I pull off the tank and get to work. Here’s the tank.



An o-ring provides a seal in between the two aluminum faces.





The two assemble together, and in they go ......



Here’s where I start to see possible conflict. Number one, I hope the Throttle Body clears the tank, and second, how will I be routing the return line...?

Time to check and see if the Throttle Body will fit....



Annnnddd...... nope. The tank interferes with the throttle body AND the tank inlet fitting. Argh!! What’s going on?



If this tank stays where it is, the TB can’t even bolt into place .... something isn’t right.

Next day I jump on KRC’s website and within short order the technical support determined that I had ordered the incorrect tank. D’oh! I had in fact ordered the tank for the Coyote engine if you are using the Boss intake, not the stock intake. The Boss intake sits the Throttle Body significantly higher and would have cleared, but didn’t clear the stock TB. I promptly order the correct tank which is not KRC part number 91412000 for the Boss intake but part number 91415000.

I receive the tank and the differences are easily noticeable, and the inlet fitting is placed in a different spot altogether.



The tank for the stock TB appears to have slightly less capacity, but I don’t think it’ll be a problem. I assemble the pump and tank together and slide into place.



Plenty of clearance, and good access to the tank inlet fitting. fist pump

Time to start finishing up the lines. The bolt-on tank eliminates a line from the tank to the pump, and any 1/2” line. The high pressure line from the pump arcs from the pump forward through the X-member and crosses behind the fan motor over to the Power steering rack fittings provided by Breeze in the Coyote PS kit.



From the Rack outlet fitting we cross over in a 180 loop to the 10” cooler mounted under the radiator.



Then from the Cooler we run push-lok tube back up to the tank inlet, finishing the circuit.

Power Steering is complete now, looking good. I like to think I am good with taking advice, and some of the advice that I have gotten during this build is..”if it’s not working, stop, step back, take a long look and reassess“... and I’m glad I did. In the words of an old boss of mine “if it don’t fit, don’t force it”. We double-check all the fittings. Time to fill the Power Steering System with fluid.








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Discussion Starter #325
One of the loose ends that I don’t want to forget is installing a clamp on the lower coolant hose as it crosses under the front frame X-member. I don’t want any knocking against the frame, as that could damage the hose in addition to dinging the POR-15 paint. I use a small section of the leftover fittings to create a rubber sleeve to sit inside the metal clamp, and slide it onto the hose.





After marking holes for rivets and drilling, I set the clamp and install the rivets. That should wrap that up.





Looks good. There is a small gap where the rubber sleeve is just an eighth of an inch too small to meet completely, but I don’t believe that will be an issue. The rubber sleeve has no room for expansion, so that gap should hold at that size indefinitely. Heck, it might even be a good thing, allowing for slight flex during expansion or contraction of the hose or clamp due to warm/cold cycles. Continuing on....


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Discussion Starter #326 (Edited)
I’ve been away from it for a while, but I haven’t detailed the drive shaft installation and alignment. I ordered the drive shaft from Factory Five, Part number 60175 for the Coyote Engine, TKO tranny and IRS Differential. It was out of stock but they got in in and shipped it to me inside of two weeks.

My daughter felt the need to be a hand model while I’m showing the space where the drive shaft is to go, so there you are.



The shaft is a real shorty; the one that came out of the mustang was a good 5 feet or so long if my anecdotal memory serves me correctly, and this one is only ten and a half inches from joint to joint. The front sleeve end of the drive shaft will slide like a collar over the output shaft of the transmission pictured below.



Then the other end will mount to the adaptor plate that we previously installed on the input plate of the differential.



Not a lot of space to cover. We install the drive shaft from up inside the cockpit with little difficulty. First we gently lower the tail end of the driveshaft into the tunnel and let it slide down past its final resting spot toward the floor. We do this so that we can start inserting the front hollow shaft into the transmission, over the transmission output shaft. It goes in without too much fuss. With the transmission in neutral, the drive shaft turns easily and we line it up the bolt holes. I temporarily tighten these bolts in, because we have more work to do.






Drive Shaft installed.... but we are not done, no, we are not done. The drive shaft angle must be measured, adjusted and set within spec, or the results could be disastrous. I learned a lot about this topic, none of which I knew before now. I’m amazed at what this car has taught me.

To begin, there are a lot of YouTube videos that do a much better job illustrating by video what I’ll attempt to explain, but the explanation will help some understand how to measure and adjust. Check them out so that you can understand how it works.

This picture has been used by many to explain what alignment means, and how to address it. For me the left-to right adjustment (lateral adjustment) didn’t apply that much. (I’ll catch heat here I’m sure) The adjustment that mattered once the engine and tranny were in place was the vertical alignment. The basics, as illustrated by this picture show it isn’t as important that the shaft itself is exactly horizontal or that it creates a smooth arc between the two (disaster), what matters is that the face of the transmission output shaft and the face of the differential adapter plate are within .5 degrees of exactly parallel to each other. If they are not, then the installation of spacers on the transmission mounting bolts is the only adjustment since the differential is fixed in place.



So how does one measure the angles of those surfaces and compare them to each other? Tremec actually has a handy app that uses the iPhone to measure the angle AND compare the three measurements for acceptable results.



It measures the tranny output shaft angle, the diff plate angle, and the drive shaft angle and provides a results readout. To measure the tranny output angle I slide the Drive Shaft partially out and use the top surface of the drive shaft collar that is still partially on the output shaft to place the phone. First measurement shows output shaft is 8.9 degrees negative and the differential plate is approximately 1.1 degrees positive. Waaaaay off, relative to each other.



In the readout, the first measurement you see is the tranny output angle. The third one is the Differential Plate. The second on is the difference between the two. Seems a little confusing, and I think they could make it a little easier to understand by changing the field labels.

So the first measurement is off quite a bit. The easiest and fastest adjustment method is to use flat washers as spacers on the transmission mounting bolts. We loosen the bolts that secure the tranny bolt hole relocate plate to the Energy Suspension transmission mount. That’s a big sentence to describe two bolts. We use our floor jack to raise the transmission enough to slide about 8 washers around the bolts on each side. We let the transmission back down onto the washer spacers, and take a new measurement.

Some improvement.... but the values are still too far apart. Have to raise it up more and stick a few more washers in. I bought 12 for each side, hopefully I’m not short. We go with 11 on each side, we will see how that works.



Taking the three measurements again, we are where we need to be. The output shaft angle and the differential plate angle are .2 degrees off. The reading on the differential plate is not reading exactly the same as it was but if it was, the difference would be zero. Right on.



We tighten the bolts back in on the tranny mount and apply some blue Loctite to the differential plate bolts before torquing them to spec.




Drive train?.... Check!





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Discussion Starter #327
Nearing the end of the chassis section of the Factory Five Book! Exciting! It’s time to work at a some more finishing-up items. Near the top of the list is the replacement of the rear Master Cylinder due to the pinhole leak. Sure, most braking does not cause it to leak, but firm pressure on the pedal causes a microscopic ooze, and I think we can all agree that over time if would be disaster. Zero leaks are tolerable in the braking system, in my mind. A little reminder picture of what happens when firm pressure is applied to the brake. This is the Rear Master Cylinder of my Wilwood dual MC setup.



You can see the little bead of brake fluid that develops.

The secondary concern is something that Edwardb pointed out earlier in the build. The supply hoses that run from the brake fluid reservoirs to the Master cylinders currently run straight down toward the exhaust headers before looping back up inside the driver’s side foot box to the MCs. There is about 6 inches of clearance between the hoses and the headers. My concern would be less aesthetic and more functional; the heat from the headers may affect the hoses up to and including possibly melting a hose. This could result in catastrophic brake failure. I’ve been thinking about changing this routing and it seems the draining of the reservoir in order to change the MC would afford me the best opportunity.

Current look.



So I give the process some thought. My primary concern is that I don’t get brake fluid on the painted surfaces, as it ruins paint relatively quickly, even POR-15. I could pump the brakes and drain the fluid through one of the caliper ports. I decide to pump as much of the brake fluid out of the reservoirs as possible before draining fluid out of the bottom fittings of the Calipers. After draining the lines it will be easier to change the MC without spillage. I plan to shorten the supply lines and replace the straight fittings that came with the triple reservoir with 90-degree fittings. I ordered these from Amazon.



I also ordered a replacement Master Cylinder in a kit from Amazon. You see the new one in the above photo as well. It was close to the only way to get one and it cost about $100. I did not find a stand-alone MC.

First we pump out as planned. I still have a almost-empty brake fluid bottle, so I use that to store the excess in for now. It doesn’t quite all fit, but I store a little extra in the pump bottle. Lines fairly empty, we proceed.

We take loose the triple reservoir and raise it up to drain the fluid and ensure the fluid inside is at a minimum. Then we disconnect the supply lines, one at a time to keep it simple. We hold a couple paper towels under the tank fittings to keep the area under them clean. We strap the lines sticking up in the air temporarily to keep them from draining on anything, and put the tank on a little temporary workbench to change the fittings.



After removing the two straight fittings, we apply some Blue Loctite and spin them in finger tight. Making our best judgement on the angle of the fittings we tighten them up. It won’t be the end of the world if they are a little off. After all they are connecting with flexible hoses. We set the reservoirs back in place and tighten the bolts back up. With that back in place, we trim the hoses up one at a time and connect them back to their respective tanks. As before, I make sure that the front tank feeds the front Master Cylinder and the rear tank feeds the rear MC. That does book a lot cleaner, I will say that. Here’s from both angles.





On to changing the Master Cylinder. After putting a couple shop rags below the assembly to catch any errant drops, we take the hard line out of the end fitting and spin the balance bar connecting rod out of the balance bar. Then we loosen the mounting bolts and remove the ‘old’ MC. This allows us to view the new one compared to the old one. If you recall, the connecting rod gets cut short so I take the old one out and mark the length of the old one on the new rod.



After cutting the new rod to the proper length we install the new MC and fasten the connecting cap onto the supply side with the supplied clamp. These Wilwood Racing products are so well color coordinated and will never be seen by anyone.

Following installation we take the 90-fitting out of the old MC and after application of some Loctite we tighten the brass 90 and the the hard line back into the new MC port. In spite of the fact that everything looks the same, the MC has been changed out and, cross your fingers, no leaks.

We fill the brake reservoirs back up and bleed the brake lines. It went significantly faster bleeding the brakes this time.




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Discussion Starter #328
It’s inevitable. It happens to most guys.... so why am I so surprised when it happened to me? I’m so ashamed ... I can barely talk about it. It’s ..... a leak!!

I have consistently put cardboard under the build to catch and indicate the possible presence and location of leaks. So far I have put Brake Fluid, Power Steering Fluid, Engine Oil, Transmission Fluid, Differential Gear Oil, Engine Coolant, and Gasoline in the car. One of those is putting a spot on the cardboard.

The oily spot is near the passenger side front area of the engine. Based on the location, it could be Oil, Power Steering Fluid, Coolant, or possibly brake fluid. It appears to be clear-ish and oil-based rather than water based because of the spread into the cardboard. Further investigation yields more information; following the spot upwards, I find the bottom of the frame tube is wet as a result of leakage on the top of the tube... this probably eliminated engine oil as a possibility. Shining a light on the frame tube, I track the wet area upwards and see where the top of it is .... and what is above it?

I find the culprit; it’s coming from the bottom of the Power Steering Fluid tank. Based on the leakage over a few days, the drip is a decent one. After identifying it, I wipe the tank bottom off to see how quickly it returns. There is a little nub that protrudes downward at the bottom of the tank. Was that engineered by KRC on purpose? I’m not sure but it’s a good design anyway. It ends up getting wet again after just a few hours. This will have to be addressed.

It seems the o-ring does not seal as well as one right think. I will have to come up with something to make this seal better.

I pose the issue to one of my friends who build customs and restomods, Cecil Palmer with Triple Cross Customs. After discussing the mating surfaces he quickly suggests eliminating the o-ring and cutting and installing a piece of gasket material across the whole flat surface instead.... Why didn’t I think of that?

Quick trip to the auto parts store and I pick up a roll of gasket material.



We drain the PS fluid from the lowest point, which is the cooler below the radiator. A little turning of the wheels back and forth helps move some more of the fluid out. We loosen up the tank to drain the rest of the fluid.



That little nub on the bottom where the fluid is coming from is the part that was wet with fluid to start with. Here is the o-ring that is supposed to seal the joint. I would have thought it would do the trick, but oh well.



Once drained, we take it over to the bench and turn the face up so that we can cut a gasket.



Simple enough to cut a gasket for the joint ....... cut a piece of gasket material slightly larger than the faces that will meet.



We take a ball peen hammer and gently tap the gasket material across the entire surface. This puts the outline of the openings on the gasket material so we can see the exact size and location of the holes we need to cut.



Then cut the holes.



Then it’s time to bolt the tank back onto the pump. I feel this will solve the problem and if it doesn’t, I’ll always think it should have. Time will tell.


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Discussion Starter #329 (Edited)
Next project is the Door Check Straps. I’ve been wanting to go Black with the straps because well, all of the surrounding leather is Black. Why would I have a raw brown strap?

I think I’m going to try the Vinegaroon method. I picked up some Cheap Apple Cider Vinegar and a pack of steel wool while at the store.

First step is to let the steel wool age in the vinegar. I chose a small glass vase that my wife had in a cupboard and poured the Vinegar into it. This first part is not real smelly, UNLIKE the later product.



One pad of steel wool deposited into the vinegar.



I had heard this concoction gets really smelly and I wanted to spare the family the grief, so I put the vase inside a Ziplock Freezer bag that I sealed and put on top of the freezer in the garage. After a week it produced enough gasses that the bag ballooned out. Not wanting some sort of disaster I cracked the bag open and let it vent naturally for another week. The steel wool had almost completely dissolved into the vinegar at this point. Time for application.



That is a disgusting mess.



Not to mention it smells awful. I have a relatively strong stomach having raised and butchered many animals, raised 3 kids and all that comes with that, and working in the construction field for 25 years. This stuff smells like if someone drank a bottle of Zinfandel , threw it up and left it to rot with some pieces of metal. Which of course is pretty much what it is.

To make sure the pieces do not smell like this brew in perpetuity, I have some baking soda dissolved into water to take the acid away after it does it’s thing. Time to get to work.



Starting with one small spot on the back of the strap as a test spot, I paint a small bit onto the brown leather. It turns the leather a brown color to begin with, but after about 20 seconds it deepens to a dark Black. Perfect! Finish that strap and move on to the next one.

This is how they start out.



Then they turn pitch black but leave the stitch snow white. Nice!



Repeat the process with the Harness Latch Backing Patches, and then rinse with some baking soda water.



Project complete! We will let them dry and then reinstall the harness pieces. The check straps will have to wait a while.


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Discussion Starter #330
It’s getting close to First Start and I’m getting excited!! Systems check ......

IRS installed, fluid added - check.
Brake system installed, fluid added and bled - check.
Engine and transmission installed - check
Engine Oil added - check
Coolant system installed and coolant added - check
Power steering System installed and fluid added - check
Transmission fluid added - check
Fuel system installed, fuel added - check
Electrical system, battery installed, most wiring done, starter installed - check

It would seem that all systems are a go and we are ready for firing this girl up!!


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Discussion Starter #331
It such an exciting time in a build! It’s basically ready for the first start! I am rather nervous, I don’t know why my mind is coming up with exploding engine or seizing engine scenarios. If I’ve done everything right it should fire up just fine and run like a top. After all, this engine has been more than broken in.

I’ll confess, I ‘accidentally’ started it up for a couple seconds earlier in the build. After getting the engine installed and electrical to the point where I could turn it on confidently without fear of shorting something out I turned the key over just to hear the engine turn over. I was not expecting anything to happen except for the engine turning over, so my side pipes were not installed. The drive train was not connected either. There must have been enough fuel in the injectors to spit a little into the Cylinder because without more than a little turn, the engine caught and roared to life, but just for a second and then just as quickly, it died. It was super loud, and we looked at each other with mouths agape and shocked smiles on our faces! We tried to pretend that nothing happened, but the other two heard us from the living room and mentioned it later after we went back in the house.

It will be a different story now. The gas tank has fuel, the side pipes are installed, the systems should be ready to go. She’s basically ready to rock-n-roll.





There are a few items that I will want to check as the first fire-up happens. I will want to monitor oil pressure, water temperature, fuel pressure and I want to check on the Power Steering Fluid level to make sure the pump does not run low or out. The KRC instructions are explicit in explaining that running for even a minute without fluid can damage the pump.

One interesting discovery as we go through this build process is the feeling of ownership control my daughter is expressing over the ridership in the vehicle. I wouldn’t consider anyone else as a candidate for the first go-cart, but she also mentioned that ANYONE who rides in the vehicle must be approved by her prior to them entering the vehicle. Lord have Mercy.

I’ll report when we have Video.


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Discussion Starter #332
I also am going to be bringing the Body Home from the storage unit where it has been sitting for a year. Before I do, I will either need to construct or commandeer a Body Buck. I posted a separate thread on the forum and a fellow builder Randy (AA737pilot) from Jantzen Beach replies with a generous offer for both a Body Buck and a Frame Dolly. Yes, please! We set up a time to meet at his storage space and I pick up both the Buck and the Dolly in my trailer. He shows me his Cobra which is just short of Gel Coat Driver status. He also went with the Coyote but has chosen different options on several large and small items such as air intake, dashboard mounting, shifter knob and turn signals with locations. He also went with High-Back racing seats and a matching color leather interior. He wanted a darker wheel color so he had a local painter take the color more towards black. Really interesting seeing the different choices builders make in the design of their cars.

Here’s a couple of pics of his car.





Thanks, Randy!! I really appreciated you giving those to me, and I’ll pass on the favor to the next guy when I’m done.

Once we got the body home, we jack up the car and set it on the frame dolly. Turning the chassis sideways allows us room to bring the body buck into the garage and still have room to walk in between, to the toolbox, and put the front of the garage.





The boxes of F5 parts have been gradually disappearing as we install the parts, and I have been breaking the boxes down to use underneath the car as catch indicators for possible fluid leaks. Only a few boxes left and they are acting as my workbench.





A little cozy, but workable. Once we fit the body on, it will feel luxuriously spacious.


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Discussion Starter #333
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