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Second, I’m considering the location of my coolant overflow/fill tank and the style. The standard is the polished Aluminum Moroso Mustang replacement tank. No sight glass, and at the accepted location, it’s below the engine, or at least appears to be. I am considering a tank similar to the Moroso 63776 tank, and mounting it back near the ECU. This will accomplish a few things. It will elevate it above the engine, it will balance the look of the stainless triple reservoir on the other side of the engine compartment, and it will make it more accessible instead of being tucked up under the hood. I would be able to dodge the coolant line inside the engine cover to hide it fairly quickly. Another small thing, it will make it look a little less crowded up at the front of the engine compartment. The rear corner of the engine compartment is looking a little lonely, with no wipers, Fuse block, etc. there is nothing over there. Just seems right to me.... maybe others have tried it and failed?
Of course, do what you want. But kind of apples and oranges comparison. The Moroso 63806 tank you see many of us installing in Coyote builds is an expansion tank. Not a traditional gravity style overflow tank. It's installed in a similar location and plumbed exactly like a Mustang. The height it ends up at is fine because it operates via pressure. Site glass isn't an issue in my experience. Once filled, I've found it doesn't change. The tank eliminates the need for a T-filler in the top radiator hose, and makes burping air from the engine a non-issue because it does that by design. Bottom line it's a closed system that operates the Coyote exactly like Ford designed it.
 

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Discussion Starter #282
Of course, do what you want. But kind of apples and oranges comparison. The Moroso 63806 tank you see many of us installing in Coyote builds is an expansion tank. Not a traditional gravity style overflow tank. It's installed in a similar location and plumbed exactly like a Mustang. The height it ends up at is fine because it operates via pressure. Site glass isn't an issue in my experience. Once filled, I've found it doesn't change. The tank eliminates the need for a T-filler in the top radiator hose, and makes burping air from the engine a non-issue because it does that by design. Bottom line it's a closed system that operates the Coyote exactly like Ford designed it.


Paul, I do plan on plumbing it like you did with a small line coming off the expansion port, not with a T-filler. It would end up acting as an expansion tank. I do want to use one that employs a blowoff cap, not just a cap, in case of emergency, and feeds from the bottom. A little more interesting to find.


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Paul, I do plan on plumbing it like you did with a small line coming off the expansion port, not with a T-filler. It would end up acting as an expansion tank. I do want to use one that employs a blowoff cap, not just a cap, in case of emergency, and feeds from the bottom. A little more interesting to find.
Still not the same since the factory setup also includes a line to the top of the radiator with a one-way valve. That's part of how it keeps air out of the system. Mustangs (and our builds) have run millions of miles without blow-off caps when set up the way Ford designed. Controlling engine temp is a big deal. Altering a known working setup is risky IMO for no other reason than the aesthetics and perceived inconvenience (which it isn't) of the tank location. Good luck whatever you do.
 

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Discussion Starter #284 (Edited)
Still not the same since the factory setup also includes a line to the top of the radiator with a one-way valve. That's part of how it keeps air out of the system. Mustangs (and our builds) have run millions of miles without blow-off caps when set up the way Ford designed. Controlling engine temp is a big deal. Altering a known working setup is risky IMO for no other reason than the aesthetics and perceived inconvenience (which it isn't) of the tank location. Good luck whatever you do.


Ahah... I must not have read enough to be aware of the one-way valve to the radiator .... I’ll re-visit that. I agree, I don’t want to mess with the way Ford designed the ECU to control the engine temperature.


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Discussion Starter #285
Back to The Dash for a bit. Final mock-up completed, we picked up some Landau Contact cement from the local Home Depot. In hindsight all we needed for the dash and seats would have been about 1 Cup, but we may end up using it for the carpet in which case we will probably use the majority of it. But back to the final dash mock-up.

Driver’s main view. Call me weird, I want to see the speedo as my primary gauge with my left arm blocking the view of the left gauge. Force of habit for eyeball movement, and that’s the main information I want.



Middle of the dash. Gauges are in order of importance from left to right and top to bottom, roughly grouping temps and pressures close to each other. The clock will not be remaining, but will be replaced by an electronic fuel pressure gauge with a pressure sender at the fuel rail when I replace the stock fuel rail. I have the wires there waiting.



Received my Headlight Switch and ignition switch and got them temped in place. Heated seat switches ... check. Ordered a hazard light switch and high beam switch from Amazon; they are a couple toggle buttons with icons and indicator lights from what appears to be the same company under two different names. Etopar? Esupport? Ok...... anyway. That concludes my gauge and switch mock-up..... time to stop procrastinating and get the dash assembled.

To support the dash we cut 4 pieces of aluminum angle bracket and countersunk screws into the dash. Before I glue the covering on, I wanted to make sure the screws don’t create any irregularities on the surface of the covering once it’s done. We use some epoxy spread thinly across the screw heads and countersink divots. I let that dry overnight sitting face up to let it spread as evenly as possible.



After letting that dry, we sand the epoxy down a little to make it flush, and then we clean the surface off with acetone. More cleaning after bending and fingerprints.

So what’s next? The assembly directions don’t do a great job of telling you what order to do what task in. After staring and thinking about it, I decide to first mark a sharpie reference mark on the back of the dash covering, then roll the ends of the dash and bend a 90 at the notches, paint on the Landau Cement, let it dry, and then stick the dash onto the covering and roll it together. I’m trying to avoid glueing the dash and covering it before bending it. We will see how this goes.

First I mark the covering on the white back for reference along the bottom lip of the dash. Then I grab a quart paint can and head to a long flat surface to try to roll these edges. Can’t lie, I’m afraid I’ll screw up. This is what I have to curve inward.



They say you can use a paint can to roll the ends ....



Here goes. I grasp the end against the paint can and roll the two toward the center of the dash, firmly keeping the two held together.



So far so good.... it’s rolling around the paint can.....



And I keep rolling until the end wraps almost completely around the can. The bend is nice and smooth.... now to bend the end 90-degrees. There are two circular notches that mark there the ends of the bend should be. My old reliable hand tongs make short work of the bend.







And there we have one end done .... repeat the process for the other end.... almost. The end of the metal at the Passenger end of the dash needs a little trimming, but just a little, and a rebend at a slightly different angle to avoid hitting the dash. In this picture the dash is putting a little pressure on the firewall.



A little snip-snip along the bottom, and my sharpie mark showing the estimated rebend angle ....



Continued....




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Discussion Starter #286 (Edited)
Before ..... you can see my bend markings, and my trim markings, at the bottom.



After...




Much better fit. No pressure. Check the other side .... how do we fit there?



Looking good on Driver’s side. Now that the dash is bent appropriately, we double-check all the holes for fitment. Two of them concern me in particular, the steering wheel and the Headlight Switch. The steering wheel hole is too tall, and I don’t want the dash cover dimpling in where there is no backing. I decide to cut a piece of sheet aluminum from my old Footbox front and epoxy that to the dash on the backside. Simple enough. For the Headlight Switch we use an oversized washer and a Dremel with a stone wheel to notch the inside of the washer before epoxying it into place behind the dash. I think it was a layout decision change that resulted in the incorrect hole size.



From the front ...



We let that dry, then filled in the front side with a little epoxy to bring those more flush. After sufficient drying time, we clean the surface with epoxy before Landau Cement is applied.


After triple-checking finished layout and clean surface, we use a 4” wide bush to apply Landau Cement to the back of the dash covering and the front of the dash surface. Drying time of 20 minutes is advised and I monitor it for tackiness and sheen. After about 20 minutes most of the two mating surfaces are dry, so it’s time to apply. There was a little waviness in the dash cover material; I’m planning on using a roller to firmly roll the material both directions outward from the center. After very carefully lining the dash up with the mark on the back of the dash material, I gently rest the dash down onto the material. After some firm pressing down of the middle of the dash onto the material, I gently pick it up and turn it over. Using a tube of silicone, I start in the center and firmly roll the material outward toward the ends, including around the curved ends. Ok.... material applied, let it dry. I’ll roll the edges over after I cut out for the gauges and can pull those tabs in at the same time.



After overnight drying I mark the cutouts and start notching the dash material for rolling it over. My cutting tool is a simple box cutter, cutting from the backside, and I do have to break it a few tabs down every so often to keep the cutter sharp.



After cutting the holes out, notching them for foldover and notching the material around the edges, I apply more Landau Cement along the edge and bottom of the dash and all the way around the perimeter of the dash material, and let that dry. The stuff is smelly, use in a well ventilated area.



After drying about 30 minutes, I fold over the edge cutouts and press them into place with my ‘Roller’. It’s starting to look better.





After drying time (yeeesh...!) I start installation of the gauges and controls.











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Discussion Starter #287
Continuing down the path.... getting more gauges in place.





Almost all done with fitting, just Headlight and ignition switches to be fitment checked.



All the gauges in, final fitting before starting in on the dash wiring.



Hmm. One issue noticed, and I’ll own this with my inexperience. The foam in the ends of the bottom of the dash are showing, and I think will continue to show.



I think the best solution is going to be making the white disappear by using some Landau Cement to cover that small area with some leftover dash cover material. Any thoughts?



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Discussion Starter #288 (Edited)
Another order from Jegs and the suggested Moroso Coyote Expansion tank is on its way. My KRC power steering kit should be arriving soon.

I return to the Engine Electrical before wiring the dash. I have to perform a number of tasks; tach connection, sender connections, Engine Harness touch-up, fan wire connection, and fuel line.

Starting with the tach connection, the Ron Francis sender Harness already has the purple wire carrying through to the dash harness and breaks out of the sender harness near the #7 coil pack. I tie in to the purple wire that feeds that coil pack.



Next comes the senders. I pondered this a while. The sender harness is long enough to make it almost around the front of the DS head and almost down to the senders themselves. I have the water temp, oil temp and oil pressure to bring up and around. So do I bring the sender harness all the way down and around to the senders, or bring the sender cables up through some convolute and make the connections up under the engine cover? Whichever way, the wires will have to avoid the steering column and pass near the headers. The route will have to stay tight as it comes around, and I plan on sleeving the wires inside some heat shield as they pass by the headers.
I end up making the decision based on the difficulty making up the connections and then accessing them later. Making them up lower will be much more difficult and prohibitive after the build is complete, whereas if I run the cables up to the area under the engine cover, it will be a simple task to take the cover off and access those connections. I group the three cables together.....



Keep reading, it’s not done .......

I pull some convolute over the three cables and sleeve some heat shield tube over the convolute. The heat generated by the header will likely make any nylon zip-ties down there brittle and crack and I opt to go with Stainless Steel zip-ties to bind them away from the header. No use taking any chances. We also ran the alternator leg of the RF harness down under the engine mount and tightened that onto the stud on the alternator.




Wrapped them up and around the front alongside the engine harness, then along the fuel rail to the connection point. Once I have the cables up there, I strip the sender cables to get down to the conductors.






From there it’s just a matter of crimping all the grounds together and connecting the sensor leads, then covering it in convolute. While I am working right there, I put the fitting on the fuel line and temp it onto the fuel rail. I have an inline port fitting coming from Amazon that I will install the fuel pressure sender in at a later date.



On the passenger side of the Coyote we replaced the 1” convolute that had covered the engine harness between the PS valve cover and the ECU. It had gotten a little roughed up before we got ahold of it, so we replaced the loom and tape..... looks much better. It’s starting to look like an engine compartment.










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Discussion Starter #289 (Edited)
Engine electrical connections done, I return to the Main Harness wiring. It’s not necessarily complicated but it would be rather lengthy going over everything I did, but I’ll try to hit all the important points.

Perhaps redundant, but the items that I chose to bring together are the Russ Thompson Turn Signal, CobraHeat heated seats, third party hazard and high beam switches, F5 Headlight and ignition switches, under-dash start-enable button, under-dash and under-frame-rail trunk courtesy lights, cigarette-lighter-style power plug, Color-coded power buses and of course the Ron Francis Main Harness.

Starting with the Hot Rod leg and Russ Thompson Turn Signal. I’m listing these two together because they relate, at least how I chose to wire it. Initially I chose to take some of the convolute off, trace the Hot Rod Leg wires back to the Dash Harness interconnect plug, and cut those wires off about 1” shy of the plug. I covered the ends of the wires with Heat Shrink to keep anything from shorting out. In hindsight, I would have cut the End harness off, and left the wires long. What I ended up doing was taking the turn signal wires and horn wires from the Hot Rod leg and redirecting them over toward the steering column. I installed a 6-pin Molex Plug on the Turn Signal wires and Hot Rod plug wires so that I could Quick-connect and disconnect during the install process, as we will be taking it off and putting it on several times.





I ordered a set of bus bars from Mofeez on Amazon, and installed them on top of the 2” crossbar. I chose to mount the negative bus directly behind the gauges and the positive behind the glove compartment are for two reasons; I need power over behind the glove compartment area and I need grounds for wiring harnesses behind the gauges.



First to mount is the ground bus in the middle. I river it to the frame and run a large bonding wire over to the 3/4” frame rail.





I put the main harness ground (dash side) on the end stud, and stack the bonding wire on that.



I make up the grounds with ring terminals and land them on the ground bus.



I had to be careful when doing this because the GPS Antennae wire looks a lot like a black ground wire and would have been easy to irreversibly clip right off. That could have been a small disaster.

I mount the positive bus on the passenger side.



I ran the heater power wire to the positive bus, and fed the heated Seats and the courtesy lights from there. The circuit is large enough to handle the amps from both seat heaters and the next-to-nothing amp draw from the LED courtesy lights. I wired up a custom switch setup with the factory quick-disconnect plugs for the dash switches for the heated seats and connected those to the bus.






On the seat end, I drilled and tapped the ground into the under-seat metal and used the Dremel to clear out enough material to ensure good frame contact to the Ring terminal.



More details to come.



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Discussion Starter #290 (Edited)
The CobraHeat install went fairly smoothly with a slight learning curve on the disassembly side.

Two mats to install for each seat, one for the back cushion and one for the Seat Cushion. They come with convenient adhesive strips on each side and are just about the perfect length for both cushions. They have trimming instruction, but I did not end up trimming any off either one.





The back cushion leather is held to the seat by a number of Hog Rings, and undoing specific rings allows the mat to be slid up under the back leather. The lower seat cushion leather is easy enough to separate from the cushion. The learning curve comes in on the number of Hog Rings you have to remove to get the seat back leather up enough to slide the mat in; it’s fewer than I thought, and only certain ones are necessary before it will lift up to allow install.







Got the back mat installed, carefully peeled the cover off the adhesive and it’s sticking in place and held by the leather. Re-secured the Leather, and now to the seat cushion.





I wrapped the mat down over the front lip of the seat cushion. I’d rather do that than trim it. With the seat cushion mat installed, now to glue the leather back to the cushion with Landau Cement.



Painted on the cement on both the foam and the leather side strips, and allowed 30 minutes to dry. Rolled them together and let them dry.



Repeated the process with the other seat, and the heat is installed.

After drying we follow edwardb’s example and install 1/4” aluminum bar spacers along the bottom seat rails. Great way to allow the wires to run down below without pinching. Only $18, plus rivets.





Drilled and riveted into place. One of the tougher things about this build is keeping the build area clean, especially with metal shavings and spirals from drilling. Maybe not tougher, but tedious. I’d rather be building than cleaning, but it must be done.

The wires can now travel through without being pinched. Now to reinsert my customized controller and make sure the connections all make it without pinching. We will wait to bolt the seats in until after carpet install.




More Electrical to follow.

Just received my KRC Kit so installation of that is coming soon.



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Discussion Starter #291
Moving toward finishing the electrical behind the dash. The Coyote Pack connections are fairly straightforward according to the CCP connection diagram and I let that connection harness sit where it naturally settled right above the steering column. I did not end up cutting the Coyote pack wires shorter, but instead created a loop of wire which worked out reasonably well with the other legs diving in and out of the convolute.






Rather messy right now, but it will clean up a bit.

I had split the main harness open to deal with the Hot Rod Leg, powering the courtesy lights, adding the power plug, turn signal and the other extras. I plug the accelerator harness into the pedal and with the connections basically done, it’s a matter of getting the wires into convolute, arranged neatly and secured to eliminate drooping. The only trailers still hanging are the ignition switch, headlight switch and wires to the trunk lights.





We use a few clamps to secure the wiring in place. After connecting the trunk light wires to the other courtesy light wires, making up the convolute and securing with some clamps, we are basically done with the behind-the-dash wiring. I dry fit the dash over the steering column and check attachment points for the harness plugs. I’ve read that location of the RF Dash Harness is paramount in making up the wiring on the back of the dash. We approximate the resting location of the harness with dash on.



Time to start making up the dash wiring. I move to the kitchen table, as it has the large flat surface I need.



Laying the wiring harness in place and keeping it in place proves to be a little challenge, as the natural curl want to either more it of flip it over. I use a couple tools to hold it down.



There’s a lot of connections to make, but most of them are straightforward according to the manual and the gauge set instructions. There are a few questions but I will address them in a later post. For now have the dash wiring mostly wrapped up.

Fitted the dash back on and clicked the connectors in. If anything is connected wrong, we will see it shortly.



Turned the Master Disconnect on, noticed the Hazard Flasher indicator light came on immediately ..... first dash wiring error, but will fix that easily. Turned the key on and .... gauges turned and whirred.... no smoke or burning smells!! No Major wiring snafus so far. Feeling good about that. Turned the garage lights off to get a better look at the backlight.



Now, the clock is not connected, so disregard that. But, the oil temp gauge is connected, but no backlight. Hmmm. MIL light is on, which I halfway expected. Gauge lights don’t dim with the Headlight Switch. So a few things to address, but making progress in the right direction. I’ll add a few more pics of the back of the dash in a later post.







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...Gauge lights don’t dim with the Headlight Switch...
They aren't supposed to. The Speedhut/FFR gauge backlighting is controlled by the inverter and dimmer rheostat in their pigtail harness. And if you don't already happen to be aware the clock pointers are not lighted...guess Speedhut just figures if it's dark out you don't need to know what time it is (won't really matter 'cause Speedhut clocks are wrong most of the time anyway) ;)

Jeff
 

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Discussion Starter #293
They aren't supposed to. The Speedhut/FFR gauge backlighting is controlled by the inverter and dimmer rheostat in their pigtail harness. And if you don't already happen to be aware the clock pointers are not lighted...guess Speedhut just figures if it's dark out you don't need to know what time it is (won't really matter 'cause Speedhut clocks are wrong most of the time anyway) ;)



Jeff


Yeah, I looked for the inverter/rheostat and couldn’t find it in the box. I’ll be coming back to that later, I may have to reorder that from Speedhut.

I am aware of the clock hands.... but I don’t have the clock connected. I’m just using it as a space holder for my fuel pressure gauge until I receive it.


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Isaac,

Thanks for the fantastic build log. I've been following your build with some interest. Your explanations make it easy to understand the logic behind your decisions. I'm still in the project planning stages and taking lots of "notes". You're making great progress!

I used to live in Vancouver, and now reside up north (Everett). I do travel down to Portland visiting friends, and would very much like to see your build some time.

Marshall
 

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Discussion Starter #295
Isaac,



Thanks for the fantastic build log. I've been following your build with some interest. Your explanations make it easy to understand the logic behind your decisions. I'm still in the project planning stages and taking lots of "notes". You're making great progress!



I used to live in Vancouver, and now reside up north (Everett). I do travel down to Portland visiting friends, and would very much like to see your build some time.



Marshall


You are welcome to come around! I do work days so let me know ahead of time if you can. Don’t forget to read the builds by edwardb, he is more experienced and has great details on his and many others. I may sound like I know what I’m doing but I’ve done lots of reading on their threads.


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Discussion Starter #296 (Edited)
I didn’t find, nor do I recall seeing the gauge dimmer in my gauge kit, so I ordered that and my fuel pressure gauge from Speedhut. The fuel gauge is supposedly 3 weeks out, but I received the dimmer assembly within a few days. Looking at it, it definitely does not ring a bell. I’ll get to that soon.

The seats are ready to install and I am moving them around unintentionally quite a bit as we work in the cockpit. It’s time to bolt them in before we damage something.

First is the fit. I find that with my 5’ 10” frame I am comfortable operating the pedals with the seat position almost all the way back to the rear. With clutch pedal depressed fully my left leg is still slightly bent. The Leather Steering Wheel is a little closer than my daily driver’s wheel, but my left arm sits comfortably with my left hand at 1 o’clock, and my right arm falls almost right on the shifter arm. I planned the seat heater wire penetrations right in the corner of the seat frame space where I anticipated placing the seat, and I have been assessing the seat fit for a while as I work on it. Time to lock it in.

One thing I have discovered in visiting others with Cobras - the seats work best when the are not mounted exactly straight with the frame. They mount at a slight outward angle to align the legs with the foot boxes.

First step is to clean the cockpit floor. It has accumulated some metal shavings, dust, and other junk. Gotta have a clean area. Just in time to dirty it up. Hehe. We take the vacuum cleaner to it.



We place the seats in place, and gauge good bolt locations. The manual does not lay out exact or required bolt locations, but I do some reading to see where others have drilled them in, and settle on these spots.

.

You can see I have two temps in just to hold the seat roughly in place while I drill the others through the floor.

The safety harnesses will pose an installation challenge if I don’t install them before the seats. I pull out the installation hardware included in the base kit and the harnesses. They are impressive, and sobering. The fact that these cars mandate a 5-point racing harness in order to be reasonably safe? I’ll be taking it slow at the beginning for sure. I’m considering taking a track instruction class that a friend teaches at PIR.... but that’s down the road a ways. Anyway...... I loosely bolt the side and rear straps into place. Looks like a bolt, nylock nut and two washers per strap.



After drilling the holes and temping the restraints in, more cleanup is necessary.



I save the front strap for last, as there is not a clear direction on placement except for ‘20 degrees behind the midline’.... or something close to that. I think I’ll place them where they will touch the front of the seat when occupied. This is as far back as would be effective in the event of a crash, and should effectively keep the center latch point held down in place under normal use. This point is about 1” back from the 2” crossbar under the seatfloor at the front.



Here’s a picture of the bolts under the floor.




The Base Kit does not come with bolts to secure the seats, so a trip to the hardware store was required to buy the Button Head SS bolts, washers and Nylon Locknuts. The seats will need to come out again when I install carpet and to facilitate this and prevent galling of the SS bolt-nut combos, I use a small amount of Anti-Seize compound on the threads. Just a dab.

Make sure that the seat cushion attachment is snapped into place before you tighten the bolts, or you will have to loosen them back up to get the cushion snapped in. Not that I made that blunder, it was a friend ... yeah, a friend.

With that in place, bolts tightened down and heater wires snapped into place, we go ahead and remove the tape over the Velcro at the back. Seat cushion down.



Repeat the procedure for the other side.




Now to adjust the harnesses. I understand the latch point should be as low as comfortable across the hips while not cutting into the top of the legs. The shoulder straps require quite a bit of adjustment into the trunk in order to not have a ton of extra on the latch end.

Once both sides are complete, we lay them in place and it’s looking good.



I will be using the Vinagroon method to dye the leather of the latch base and the door straps.

My only fitment question is on the outer shoulder strap on both sides. The anchor point on the frame is too close to the side panel to sit straight, so it sits a little tweaked inward. This is in conflict with the cutout in the cockpit panel, which is slightly outside of the frame rail. This creates a zig-zag in the shoulder strap that can’t be good. I imagine in normal use the strap may wear on the inner contact point of the cockpit hole, and in the event of an impact the belt may tear or shear.





I have time to make possible tweaks, as the seats will be coming back out before carpet installation. No pressure.

Input would be appreciated here.






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You ask for input. Hope it turns out OK, but generally not recommended to finalize the seat locations until the body is on. The upper corner of the seats, near the door latches, is pretty close to the body with the seats in their optimal position. Now that you've done it, hope for the best. But you may have to adjust them once the body is on. Also, I like bling as much as the next guy, and use my share of SS bolts. But I hope you realize those hardware store SS bolts are roughly half the strength of grade 5 hardware. I personally wouldn't use them in high stress or safety related places. And bolting the seats down would fit both categories. On a different front, I too am about 5'-10" and find with the standard Roadster seats, all the way back against the back wall is about right. Taller folks end up with different seats plus probably have to bend their legs some more.
 

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Discussion Starter #298
Ahhh.... didn’t think about the bolt strength, just durability underneath the car after completion. I’ll rethink those, and look for some button-head grade 8.

I was looking for input on the restraint strap placement, and the sharp-edge and/or shear force put on it by the cockpit metal edge.


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I was looking for input on the restraint strap placement, and the sharp-edge and/or shear force put on it by the cockpit metal edge.
Sorry, meant to respond about that one too. Not much you're going to do about the placement of the attachment. All Mk3 and Mk4's have been that way since FF went away from the single attachment point. The kit includes some plastic edging to put around the opening. Or many of use these seat belt trim plates to smooth out the edge. Plus they look better. I haven't seen any wear on my Mk4 harness after three driving seasons. I really don't think it's an issue for routine use. In the event of a collision, agree it's maybe less than optimal. But I personally don't see any chance that's going to shear the belt. If it does, afraid there are bigger problems to deal with. Just don't ever find out.
 

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Discussion Starter #300
Sorry, meant to respond about that one too. Not much you're going to do about the placement of the attachment. All Mk3 and Mk4's have been that way since FF went away from the single attachment point. The kit includes some plastic edging to put around the opening. Or many of use these seat belt trim plates to smooth out the edge. Plus they look better. I haven't seen any wear on my Mk4 harness after three driving seasons. I really don't think it's an issue for routine use. In the event of a collision, agree it's maybe less than optimal. But I personally don't see any chance that's going to shear the belt. If it does, afraid there are bigger problems to deal with. Just don't ever find out.


Excellent, will order two pairs of those. Appreciate that.


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