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Heater Heater,

Isaac - I read your reply but want to give it another shot to you.

1. I speak from the experience of 47,000 miles in my Mark IV, and probably 3-4 dozen drives in the rain, at least half a dozen of which were "the sky is falling" gushers. I don't intentionally head out in the rain unless I'm in the midst of a multi day journey (See patented "Tour de XX" adventures).
2. If you limit yourself to slam dunk warm sunny drives, you'll really be limiting your options, especially where you live. Warm days can turn into cool evenings on the way home.
3. Rain X in combination with a manual model T type wiper does the business with rain. No doubt Rain X and real wipers would be even better. You needn't be wary of starting a drive if there's a possibility of rain later on.

I'll leave you alone after this but just suggest you think twice while your in this phase of the build before opting out of the heater.
 

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Discussion Starter #242
I am going to be receiving my transmission from Mike Forte and am wondering if anyone in the Vancouver WA/Portland OR area has Coyote Lift Plates I can use in about 2-4 weeks? I have the chain and the lift as well as the bolts, but need the plates.


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Heater Heater,

Isaac - I read your reply but want to give it another shot to you.

1. I speak from the experience of 47,000 miles in my Mark IV, and probably 3-4 dozen drives in the rain, at least half a dozen of which were "the sky is falling" gushers. I don't intentionally head out in the rain unless I'm in the midst of a multi day journey (See patented "Tour de XX" adventures).
2. If you limit yourself to slam dunk warm sunny drives, you'll really be limiting your options, especially where you live. Warm days can turn into cool evenings on the way home.
3. Rain X in combination with a manual model T type wiper does the business with rain. No doubt Rain X and real wipers would be even better. You needn't be wary of starting a drive if there's a possibility of rain later on.

I'll leave you alone after this but just suggest you think twice while your in this phase of the build before opting out of the heater.
Agreed, I've been caught 3 times in the rain this year. Also living in California, warm days can turn to chilly nights quickly.

Dewey
 

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Discussion Starter #244
To summarize the electrical and the additions/changes I am envisioning;

Ron Francis Chassis Harness
Coyote Control Pack
Coyote Pack Main Fuse
Main Power Disconnect
Heated Seats
Third Brake Light
Courtesy Lights under Dash
Courtesy Light in Trunk
Vintage Gauge Set
Add Oil Temp Gauge
Add Electronic Fuel Pressure Gauge
F5 Ignition switch
F5 Headlight Switch
Trouble Light from Coyote Pack
12V lighter outlet
Russ Thompson Turn Signal
Color-Coded Pos and Neg Buss bars behind Dash
Under-dash starter interlock button (instead of Clutch Bottom)

Still on the fence regarding the Fuel Pressure Gauge. I have the wires already there (the existing EFI crank wires) if I happen to want them. They will be in the DS wiring bundle right beside the fuel rail should I decide to make that happen.

Gathering my thoughts before I get started in earnest. So far I ran the Rear Harness, I’ve temped in the Coyote Control Pack Harness, installed the Front Harness and mocked up the Main Harness briefly before removing it to spray the Lizard Skin.

Common sense tells me to start at one end and move through to the other. Starting at the battery I already ran the cable to the engine bay through the transmission tunnel, so first stop is the Main Battery Disconnect. I ordered a disconnect from Amazon, and get to installation. After center measurement I use a Step Bit to pop the holes through the sheet metal in between the transmission tunnel and the 2x2 crossbar. Measure twice, cut once. Never mind the paint pen marks, they will be covered by carpet. Some countersink machine screws and it’s good to go.





A shot from the backside ...



Next I temp in the Main Fuse and check to see how I’m going to run those conductors. The Coyote Pack wants power all the time, so I’ll connect it to the same terminal as the feed from the battery. The ‘Load’ side of the disconnect will feed the starter and the Ron Francis Harness.







Having gotten that sorted out, I get in touch with my neighbor and have him make a mounting bracket for the main fuse, as it’s just mocked up with a couple zip ties. Back to that later.

I go ahead and slide the Main wiring harness into place, but I don’t put the mounting bolts through the fuse block plate yet. I want to see what I’m going to be dealing with. The two wiring harnesses are going to mate, but how and where is yet TBD. I start breaking into the two wiring harnesses to see what goes where and how best to route it.





The first thing I want to do is the simple stuff like remove the Hot Rod leg from it’s current spot inside the Driver’s Footbox. Time to break out the crimp tool and heat gun and start cutting some wires.



The upper wires with the long Molex connector on it is the Hot Rod Leg. FYI you will need to leave many of those wires long even if you cut them and get rid of the Hot Rod connector. I’m using the Russ Thompson Turn Signal and need them to be long so they can make it over to the other side of the steering wheel.

Next a couple of easy items; the Inertia Switch and the OBD plug. I’ll follow the example of builders before me and locate those over on the Passenger Side to avoid the congestion. I have to extend the wires in order to do so. I’ll also locate the GPS speedo receiver over there and run all those wires back that way in 1 piece of Wire Loom.



This part of the build is quite involved, with several working pieces; Main Harness, Dash Harness, Sender Harness, Tach wire, Turn Signal, Dash Gauges, Dash Install, Dash Covering, Ignition Switch, Headlight Switch..... complex and will take more than a few posts to get through. My patience will be tested.








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Discussion Starter #245 (Edited)
Starting to put some components in place even if I’m not wiring them up quite yet....

I bought these round puck lights at the Auto Parts store to use for my courtesy lights, and a cigarette lighter receptacle so that I can plug a phone charger or something else in while on extended drives. I’ll use the courtesy light wire from the Headlight Switch to power these courtesy lights and the one in the trunk.



I plan on mounting these under the dash support braces that I bought from Mark at Breeze Automotive. Lots of great thoughtful accessories over there. In order to mount them, I have to mock up the dash and see what I think.



I spot where I think will be the best location for the dash braces will be.





I decide that for longevity, appearance and structural integrity I will bend the braces straight and mount them on the top of the 2x2 frame member, instead of the 90-degree bend that would put the bend on the cockpit side of the frame rail. Some silicone and rivets and we will have the supports in place.









After those are in place, I go ahead and round the rear hole out enough to get a Nutsert in the hole, and cinch in a 1/4-20 nutsert in each dash support. Clipping off the wire connectors from each lead, I measure and drill a small hole above each puck the that the wire leads will not be exposed, but they will be protected as they go through the metal hole.









In order to turn on all the lights at the same time, I run the red wires over to the courtesy light lead on the PS and the ground wires to the area where I will install the Ground Buss




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Discussion Starter #246
The cigarette lighter plug will go in the center support for convenience.






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Discussion Starter #247 (Edited)
Exciting news, my shipment from Mike Forte arrived and the Tremec and associated parts are here!



Double-checking the manifest, everything is here, TKO500, QuickTime Bellhousing, splash plate, Starter, Clutch, Clutch Fork, Pivot bearing, and associated hardware.







Kind of ironic they call this a ‘Mini-Starter’. Not much Mini about it.



Time to take the engine down off the engine stand and start assembling the drive train. I bit the bullet and went to Harbor Freight for a hoist and a load leveler. I also previously bought two lift chains with small bolt plates already on the ends. I went ahead and assembled the engine hoist, hung the load leveler on the hoist and threaded the chain through the load leveler and bolted the chain to the lift bolt holes. The pre-made small lift plates on the ends of the chain were just large enough to lift the engine while not damaging the valve covers or other parts of the engine.





The engine did want to lean heavily to the front due to the bolt hole location, my guess is that it’s most likely designed to balance with the transmission mounted. I wanted to get it down onto a level surface to work on, and I managed to get it down on two pieces of 2x10 and 4x10 that I had laying around.



A dry fit of the bell housing will reveal any offset. It’s important to measure this and make any corrections if necessary. What I need to measure is any offset between centerline of the engine crankshaft (thus the flywheel) and the centerline of the transmission input shaft. Any offset greater that .005” can cause undue pressure and strain on the transmission input shaft bearing and this will cause stress and eventually failure of the bearing or other parts. I didn’t have a Magnetic Base Dial Indicator, so another trip to Harbor Freight was in order. $35 including tax isn’t bad. After some finagling I got a reliable measurement down and marked on the bellhousing .



Looks like the bell housing is off about .012” high and right. If you need instructions on how to measure this and decide on remediation, YouTube is a great resource.

This will call for removal of the existing zero-offset Dowel Pins and implementation of .007” offset dowel pins. Some quick calls to the local auto parts stores reveals only one can get offset dowel pins, and they will be about $20. I order those, and they will be in Monday. In the meantime I can remove the old ones.



A little searching for the best methods, and it seems the common success stories include applying heat to the engine block and using some penetrating oil on the Dowel Pin. I use my Heat Gun on the engine block after spraying some WD-40 on the Dowel pins and then use Vise Grips on the Pins. They come out relatively easily with some twisting and pulling action.





While I’m waiting till Monday, I can still work on mounting the Clutch on the flywheel. Not to mention the electrical, which I have a ways to go on.

I have to say, this build is teaching me patience.


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Hi Isaac,

your quote "In order to turn on all the lights at the same time, I run the red wires over to the courtesy light lead on the PS and the ground wires to the area where I will install the Ground Buss"

Unfortunately this will not work as the courtesy light switch that is built into the headlight switches to ground. Therefore you need to wire the negative of the courtesy lights to the courtesy light lead and connect the positives to a fused positive.

Hope this makes sense.

Cheers, Nigel in South Oz
 

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Discussion Starter #249
Hi Isaac,



your quote "In order to turn on all the lights at the same time, I run the red wires over to the courtesy light lead on the PS and the ground wires to the area where I will install the Ground Buss"



Unfortunately this will not work as the courtesy light switch that is built into the headlight switches to ground. Therefore you need to wire the negative of the courtesy lights to the courtesy light lead and connect the positives to a fused positive.



Hope this makes sense.



Cheers, Nigel in South Oz


I follow. How unfortunate. I will re-evaluate. Thanks!


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No worries mate. I also meant to say that your build is coming along well. I am glad that you are taking the time to document the journey. I didn't through a combo of being time poor and feeling like it was already covered by others. That was a mistake. I don't have anything to show people who now take an interest in the car and how it was put together. it is something that is hard to visualise for someone that doesn't have a thorough interest in cars. I also get a lot of enjoyment out of watching people progress on this forum with their builds and I feel a bit guilty for not doing my part. Keep up the great work.

Cheers Nigel in South Oz
 

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Discussion Starter #251
Thanks, appreciate that, Nigel. I find I have less time to type than time to build, and I fall behind in the documenting..... probably a common theme. I take many pictures, including one each day from the same spot in my garage. I hope to create a time-lapse sequence from beginning to end when I’m all through.


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Discussion Starter #252
I worked on making up Weather-packs today. So many good ideas on these forums!! Weather-packs are perfect for the front and rear lights as they create a quick-connect/disconnect for the body as you need to mount or dismount the body on and off the chassis. They will also provide weather and dust protection after final assembly and if you assemble them with the correct polarity, they can help prevent accidentally connecting the lights backwards.

Each corner has a set of two lights. The front corners have headlights with high and low beam and a dual filament running light. The rear corners have two dual filament lights each, and I’ve seen the most common setup is to use both for running lights in the dimmer luminosity, the upper on each side for brake lights on the brighter luminosity, and the lower used for the turn signal on their ‘bright’ illumination. This means you end up with four corners that each have two fixtures each and each of those fixtures needs 3 conductors. One ground, one bright and one dim. Sounds like 3-pin connectors should do the trick. Amazon is quite good for these connectors. I also ordered a Wiss crimp tool for these connectors.

I am also planning on adding a ground conductor landing at each corner, on the frame.

Getting started on the connectors.....







And the finished product for that corner ....



I’ll land all the ground when I have them done.... for now I’ll keep working on getting these finished up. That includes getting the connectors installed on the lights themselves, and in the case of the front lights, I can install the front body mounts which have the convenient light mount integrated.











Notice on the harness I installed one male and one female connector to tell myself which one to connect.



Rear harnesses made up. I also added a set of wires on the passenger side for a third brake light in the middle of the full width roll bar I am planning. I left them long just in case.




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I agree with you that Weatherpacks are easy to use and work great. You mention your crimp tool but don't picture it. I assume it's made specifically for Weatherpacks? Or that has crimp dies for them. Looking closely at your pictures of the terminals, it doesn't seem you're getting a good "roll" of the small fingers of the terminals into the stripped wire. Some Weatherpack crimp tools do both the wire and the seal at the same time. I actually prefer a more simple version that does each separately. That way I can confirm the wire (the most important part) is properly completed, rolled over, and tight. I typically do a little tug or pull test on the wire to make sure it's firmly held. Then crimp over the seal which doesn't need to be super tight. You're probably OK, but I'd recommend taking a look at your crimps and make sure they're solid. Also make sure you're using the proper pin for the wire size. The pins (and seals too) come in several different sizes. Those headlight wires, for example, would require the larger 12 gauge pin and appropriate sized crimp die.
 

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I wasn't satisfied that the crimp tool I used was doing a good job, so I wicked a little solder in the joint after crimping to guarantee a good connection. You just need to ensure that solder dosent flow into the connector section. I also purchased a pin releasing tool to fix the inevitable late night stuff up 🤨

Regards Nigel in South Oz
 

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Discussion Starter #255
I agree with you that Weatherpacks are easy to use and work great. You mention your crimp tool but don't picture it. I assume it's made specifically for Weatherpacks? Or that has crimp dies for them. Looking closely at your pictures of the terminals, it doesn't seem you're getting a good "roll" of the small fingers of the terminals into the stripped wire. Some Weatherpack crimp tools do both the wire and the seal at the same time. I actually prefer a more simple version that does each separately. That way I can confirm the wire (the most important part) is properly completed, rolled over, and tight. I typically do a little tug or pull test on the wire to make sure it's firmly held. Then crimp over the seal which doesn't need to be super tight. You're probably OK, but I'd recommend taking a look at your crimps and make sure they're solid. Also make sure you're using the proper pin for the wire size. The pins (and seals too) come in several different sizes. Those headlight wires, for example, would require the larger 12 gauge pin and appropriate sized crimp die.


Just a couple quick pics of my crimp tool .... agreed making sure the connections are solid is a big deal.





I have been keeping a close eye on the crimps, and given each one the pull-test. The only ones that aren’t rolling completely over are the #12 wires. I realize normally those are the ones to worry about, and they are only on the Headlight wires ..... I’m going to be using LED lamps, do you think the Amp draw is going to be something to worry about?


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Discussion Starter #256
Before the engine goes in there are some things that will be a lot easier to do. One of those is install the heat -reflective adhesive-back mat that I planned for the Footbox panels on the engine bay side. I bought two pieces of 12x24 mat, one for each side of the engine bay where the headers will be close to the foot boxes. Time to apply these before it’s too late.



Here’s the Passenger Footbox surfaces, and I want to apply the material along the inside face where the headers mount on the engine, and then across the end of the footbox where the headers turn together toward the outside of the car.



Post-application I can see a few bubbles in the material, evidence my work is not as smooth as I thought. I’ll have to pop a few bubbles and smooth them down.



The Drivers side Footbox will be a little more of a challenge .....



I decided to split the material along the seam to avoid awkward wrinkles around the front corner, but I miscalculated by about a quarter inch.



I will be ordering another piece of material to complete the wrap around the front of the DS Footbox and to cover the slit along the seam. Amazon will probably have it here in a day or two, plenty of time to get that done before the engine goes in.

The supervisor came out to check on my work ...... moving right along, Sir!! What a slave driver. So pushy.




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I have been keeping a close eye on the crimps, and given each one the pull-test. The only ones that aren’t rolling completely over are the #12 wires. I realize normally those are the ones to worry about, and they are only on the Headlight wires ..... I’m going to be using LED lamps, do you think the Amp draw is going to be something to worry about?
LED headlights certainly draw far less current than the kit supplied Halogen ones. Probably you're OK. But I still wonder if you're using the 12 gauge pins for those wires. My experience with the larger gauge wires and the matching pins (and seals) show similar rollover as the smaller gauges.
 

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Discussion Starter #258
LED headlights certainly draw far less current than the kit supplied Halogen ones. Probably you're OK. But I still wonder if you're using the 12 gauge pins for those wires. My experience with the larger gauge wires and the matching pins (and seals) show similar rollover as the smaller gauges.


No, I don’t currently have the #12 pins in there. Looks like I’ll be ordering a pin remover and some #12 pins to get that right. I think the pins currently in there are only good to 14.


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Discussion Starter #259
The electrical is nearing completion, and with a few fixes and tidying up, I will be finishing that up this weekend with the exception of the dash gauges. I ordered the number 12 replacement pins for the Weather Packs and a Weather Pack Pin removal tool for replacing the pins at the Headlight connections and am taking care of that.

The # 12 wires were not grabbing all the way, so using the #12 pins I remade those connections.



After removal of the smaller pins and installation of the #12-#10 pins, the fit clearly folds over and makes a firm connection.



I remade all the # 12 connections at the Headlight harnesses. Nice and solid now.

After carefully making sure that most of my connections were made and all bare ends of cables were protected against shorting against the frame or other metal parts, I connected the battery so I could check functionality of the electrical, such as it is. I wanted to make sure everything is working ok before closing up and taping/strapping all the wire loom behind the dash.

Moments of truth .....does the electrician understand car wiring diagrams ........?

For this first step I made sure my Main Disconnect was off and the key out, as well as the ignition key in the off position and the Headlight Switch in the off position. Connected the battery ...... No sparks or smoking wires, that’s a plus! Next, I turn on the main battery disconnect and things seem to be ok. However, my courtesy lights are on all the time .....



After a little circuit tracing and thinking that through, I determined I had wired the courtesy lights correctly, with a small snag. I had already fed a constant hot to the red wire on the lights, and then connected the courtesy light wire to the black wire. This was supposed to complete the circuit when the Headlight Switch is turned to the courtesy light position. The snag happened when the lights themselves have a metal body that is connected to their internal ground and when I secured them to the dash supports I ensured they were permanently grounded. This they would be on 100% of the time. To eliminate that I installed a rubber spacer to eliminate the contact between the light and the dash support, and a fiber washer between the securing machine screw and the light body. This isolated the light from being grounded by the mounting hardware. Now the lights switch on and off with the courtesy light function on the Headlight Switch.



Next, with my Weather Packs all made up, I mock up the tail lights and front running lights in order to check operation. Click the Headlight Switch to halfway ..... and the lights come on.



My first foray into powering up the car under my belt, I disconnected the red wire and went back to work finishing up electrical.

Next up, trunk light. As electricians that do residential remodel work we do our share of kitchen remodels. Under-cabinet lights have really been heading the direction of LED strip light in the last 5 years, and we have installed enough to have several scraps laying around at the shop. One just happens to be the perfect length for the trunk, and a plus; they are natively 12V. I clean off the bottom of the trunk frame rail, peel off the back and apply the strip light to the rail.





Now to wire in the light to the courtesy light circuit..... electricians usually take the easiest path. In this case I already have an unusable ‘circuit’ going from the dash to the transmission tunnel... the speed sensor wires. It should be reasonably easy to extend those wires to the trunk area and connect them to the new trunk lights. I go ahead and crimp some wire on and take a path right by the battery cable and then alongside the fuel tank vent tube until I popped right through the side by the roll bar footing.





The LED strip lights have end connectors with a premade lead on them, so they crimp right onto the leads I extended to them. On the other end I connect them to the courtesy light hit and switched ground from the Headlight Switch. Testing confirms operation.



More Electrical details to follow.




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Those 12 gauge crimps look much better. Congrats on passing the smoke test. :eek: It's fun bringing it all to life.
 
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