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Discussion Starter #221 (Edited)
The normal Auto Parts stores don’t have the 75W-85 gear oil that the Differential calls for, so another trip to Tony’s Auto Parts. That place is getting to know me by name..... picked up the Friction Modifier as well.

I already had a fluid hand pump for this task, so with all the materials in hand we raised the car up on the jack stands, with the front higher than the rear to assist draining. After removal of the plugs, I let the fluid drain for a couple hours while I ran some errands.







Pumping the gear oil and friction modifier into the Differential is a two-hand task not conducive to taking pictures. Suffice it to say after reinstalling the lower drain plug I pumped three pints of gear oil and three ounces of friction modifier into the Differential. Interesting that the drain plugs both have magnets on the back end that sit in the gear oil and collect little iron pieces out of the oil. At first it just looked like the plug just had a weird molded back to it (perhaps for manufacturing efficiency), and it took me a minute to realize what it was and clean them off.





Some Blue Loctite on the plugs, pop the upper one back in when done, and another task checked off the list.


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Discussion Starter #222
Here’s an annoying little repetitive drip that I am having to deal with. The Lower ball joints on both sides of the front have a persistent little drip out of the grease fitting, right into the channel on the inside of the wheel. Every few days I am getting 1-2 drops from alternating sides. I’m not sure why, and it sure will get more difficult to clean these up after the body is on. Anyone else had to deal with this?




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Discussion Starter #223
So, with the wiring harnesses run to the rear of the chassis and the battery connections cut through and mocked up, nothing stands in the way of installing the trunk sheet metal and the cockpit sheet metal. So, may as well get moving on it.

One last little piece, the front end of the Passenger Side fuel tank mounting strap does not line up well, the strap needs a little persuasion to align straight with the chassis mount, and if the bolt were a little longer, it would be a lot easier to get the strap installed. Quick trip to the hardware store at lunch, longer bolt in hand, and voila!



I’m leaving that a little loose so the bolt on the other end will be easier to deal with in a minute.

Starting with the lower trunk metal, silicone and rivets will lock it in. This piece gets some interference from the PS fuel tank mounting strap (read, the strap bolt has to be removed in order for the sheet metal to slide in) so I stick the jack under the fuel tank, remove the rear bolt, apply the silicone and delicately place the metal back in place. Rivets are fun!! I tell myself.

Following the lower sheet metal, I silicone the upper trunk deck and maneuver that piece into place. Those two pieces tie for the pain-in-the-butt factor for install of sheet metal pieces. The two side pieces for the trunk go in relatively easily after that.



Yes, I did install the front-most row of rivets on the trunk deck before installing the cockpit metal. It is odd that the manual tells you to install the cockpit pieces after it the cockpit metal. I don’t think it’s intentional.

After mocking up the cockpit pieces for one last time, I take them loose and install the drivers side floor piece and side.



Then starting the rear cockpit wall, the transmission tunnel rear piece and side pieces go in.







I can see I may get a hard time about my silicone method, but I’ll share it anyway. I call it the ‘White Measles’.



Rear cockpit wall goes in, and just about finishes it up.







The transmission runner cover is going to stay off until the engine and tranny is in place, as I can’t even pretend to know where finalized locations are.




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Discussion Starter #224
After getting the majority of the sheet metal in place, I started buttoning up the small touch-up pieces like the fuel tank access covers in the trunk and Footbox Front pieces.

Starting at the rear, drill, cleco, drill the rest, silicone, rivet, repeat.





Fuel tank strap patch piece.





Moving forward, the firewall patch.



Over to the driver’s side, the Footbox front filler plate, inside or out? I went outside.





Patched the hole in the transmission tunnel, I know it’s not the round patch.... but it works and I’m not taking it off now.






Finally decided to make up the seam in between the DS Footbox and the tunnel end piece, I just had clecos holding it together till this point. It is also time to connect the DS Footbox piece and the Firewall, and I have to firm up that lower part before the firewall. I also clecod the upper Footbox pieces into place in order to gauge where to rivet the footbox and the firewall together. I’ve had the Footbox clecod together for so long it almost feels weird to finally button it up.





I am having a local company that we are doing work for make up a couple inside wall trunk pieces, and those are the last pieces to go in before Lizard Skin .... to the task of masking for now.


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Discussion Starter #225 (Edited)
In order to mask off the sheet metal in preparation for the Lizard skin, I remove the things I don’t want to spray, starting with the Main wiring harness that I had temped in place. I removed the steering wheel which I had sitting loosely in place.

I also raised the car up on the jack stands for this part, it’s going to be easier to do this part with a few inches less bend-over action. My back isn’t as young as it used to be.

Starting with the hard part ..... taping off the front, dash pieces and all. I decided to leave a little overlap from the edge of the sheet metal onto the frame rail for continuity... maybe 1/8” at most.





In the middle of masking I recalled the firewall brace I had read about. Now to fab one .... where could I get a piece of metal to make a brace with that already has a 90 ...... the old Base Kit Footbox Front! Fabbed one by measuring and cutting a piece and installed with silicone and rivets.







On with the masking. Taping is tedious, time consuming and doesn’t do my body any favors. By comparison the covering of the gross areas that need to be covered by plastic is easy.









Rather than patch all the corner holes with epoxy, I duck under the car and stick tape to the back sides of the holes ..... I figure the Lizard Skin will fill the holes on its own.



Reading that the spray does not really atomize, but shoot onto the surface, I reason that shielding the Wilwood Footbox and Steering column by wrapping them with paper. I also cover the trans tunnel and e-brake hole with paper.



I removed the pedal pads and wrap the pedals with Saran Wrap. Easy enough to remove after spraying is done.



Masking is complete, time to clean and prep the metal.


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Discussion Starter #226
Thinking ahead to the point after the Lizard Skin is complete, I know I will be starting on the wiring portion of the work. As of right now I only have the Ron Francis Wiring Harness. I will need the Coyote Control Pack and the Gauge set. I place my orders for those items, and within a week they are projected to land on my doorstep.

Also got the notification that my replacement radiator is on its way from Factory Five.

The Ron Francis Harness comes with a fabulous schematic, but does the Coyote Control pack also have such a detailed drawing? I’m sure there will be some dieting out of unnecessary items, like the Hot Rod leg of the Main Harness. I’d like to know what I’m doing with the two harnesses, as there is likely to be some overlap.


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These are the instructions that come with the Ford Performance Coyote controls pack. Not a schematic quite like the RF manual. But enough diagrams and pin-out details to get the job done. https://performanceparts.ford.com/download/instructionsheets/FordInstShtM-6017-504V.pdf

One hint regarding your Lizard Skin application. Since you're in close proximity to other stuff in your garage, I'd recommend throwing some drop cloths over that stuff as well. I've found the overspray (if you can call it that...) goes further than you might expect.
 

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Discussion Starter #228
I’ll take that advice. In addition to having a layer of paper on the floor, I will also have my assistant builder (daughter) holding a spray shield in place behind the spray area to catch any ‘over-spray’.


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Discussion Starter #229
Last-minute details, I also ordered heated seat inserts from Cobraheat.com... received those. Call me too firmly entrenched in the Electrical trade, but running the heated seat wires across the sheet metal under the Lizard Skin feels too much like running household Romex across the floor under the carpet of a house. Huge Code Violation! We would get lectured by the inspector and mocked by coworkers and associates. I can never justify running Romex across a floor...... and it feels too much like that. So what I’ll end up doing is routing the heated seat wires out the back of the firewall with the harnesses that are already exiting and then picking a strategic spot to break out with a small loom to route down along the 4” tube members in the transmission tunnel and then pop up under the seats themselves. Not that this is any better, just too hung up on the electrical trade practices. I’ll mock that part up, drill the holes and install some simple loom in the holes under the seats before I spray the Lizard Skin so that will be locked in there as well. Work and pictures to follow tonight.


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Last-minute details, I also ordered heated seat inserts from Cobraheat.com... received those. Call me too firmly entrenched in the Electrical trade, but running the heated seat wires across the sheet metal under the Lizard Skin feels too much like running household Romex across the floor under the carpet of a house. Huge Code Violation! We would get lectured by the inspector and mocked by coworkers and associates. I can never justify running Romex across a floor...... and it feels too much like that. So what I’ll end up doing is routing the heated seat wires out the back of the firewall with the harnesses that are already exiting and then picking a strategic spot to break out with a small loom to route down along the 4” tube members in the transmission tunnel and then pop up under the seats themselves. Not that this is any better, just too hung up on the electrical trade practices. I’ll mock that part up, drill the holes and install some simple loom in the holes under the seats before I spray the Lizard Skin so that will be locked in there as well. Work and pictures to follow tonight.
Punch through and hang them out in the open if you like. Many do. But buried in the corners of the cockpit, under the Lizard Skin or not, and under the carpet, isn't remotely vulnerable. I would suggest more protected than having them outside in the tunnel. They're also low voltage DC unlike your high voltage AC example. (BTW, pull up the carpet and insulation on your average DD and you'll find wires under there as well. Again, low voltage DC.)

Then on the top of the carpet, wherever you run the wires, under the seats to the connectors.
 

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Discussion Starter #231
Looks like I have finally run up against the infamous Photobucket upgrade notice. I’ll have to figure out another way to post photos.

Have the first layer of Lizard Skin Sonic on the car, will get some photos up later. Now back to it to get the second layer on.


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Discussion Starter #232
After a brief Hiatus from posting, I’ll continue with the narrative.

Prepping for the Lizard Skin, I carefully measure the penetration for the Heated Seat wires, and it works out perfectly; the location of the hole lines up to keep them tucked right along the inner side the 4” frame tube and out of the way of the drive train. I’ll anchor them later, For now I’m just concerned with getting them temped in place for the Lizard Skin. Running the wires and cinching them in place will wait until later.











With that completed and the masking done, I gave the aluminum panels a once-over with Acetone to clean them, and then took a medium grit sanding block to the aluminum panels in order to ensure a good grip.





At work we happened to be doing some work for a International company that makes Signs and Graphics, and they make all sorts of custom sizes and shapes of sheet aluminum to back some of their products. A little conversation with the owner Matt and he and his man Tim custom-fabbed me two pieces of aluminum for the sides of the trunk. I’ve seen other guys do it and decided to copy their concept.





I’m also opting to carry the Lizard Skin over the forward trunk frame rail. As you see in the previous picture I do not have that masked off. I think it will stand up better to the seat belt straps, and it will simplify me task of applying the Lizard Skin.

Next stop...... spraying!




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Discussion Starter #233
According to the directions on the buckets of Lizard Skin, step number one MUST be the Sonic Insulation. I break out my brand new Pro Spraying gun. I adjust the nozzle to 1.5 turns out and set the compressor at 50 PSI.





I may have gone a little light, but I can always put additional coats on...right? Probably first-time timidity, I think I would be a little heavier on the first application if I was to do it again.

Following examples of others I applied two layers of tape, and I pull the outer layer of tape to get a nice edge on the material. After the layer dries I go ahead and re-apply a second layer of tape. Tedious work..... not my favorite.







I also had taped off the not-yet-mounted driver-side Footbox pieces for Lizard Skin application.



After the first layer I applied two more layers and got almost to the bottom of the bucket of Sonic Insulation.

Following that, I started in with the Ceramic Insulation. After the heavy Sonic Insulation the Ceramic material is really light; almost feels like the gun is empty.







In between each layer I allowed about 24 hours to dry, and about three days in between the two layers of Ceramic. It takes longer to dry than the Sonic.

After the last layer I pull the tape and let it dry. With a little rain outside it’s taking a little longer for the material to dry. I’m not going to pull all the masking off yet because the dried material tends to flake off the paper and plastic, and I don’t want to have small dried pieces embedding themselves into the drying material and creating an uneven surface.

Side note; my compressor may be on its last legs. It had a hard time keeping up after it had been running a while, and that made it difficult to spray continuously. It does make a big difference.




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Discussion Starter #234
With the Lizard Skin all dry and some sun out I go ahead and pull the tape off and remove the plastic and paper covering the frame.









Having the car hidden under the plastic and paper for a couple weeks started to make it feel like that was all the car was. Freeing it from under those layers made it feel like a whole project again and brought a smile back to my face.

In order to get the paper up off the floor and the garage floor cleaned up I rolled the car out to the driveway and snapped a few pictures. Man, it’s looking good! I’m proud of my progress.















Garage cleaned up and swept, we roll the car back in and start preparing for wiring.


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Discussion Starter #235 (Edited)
We received the replacement radiator, and good news, no damage! Time to fit the good one.



Taking the good advice of senior builders, I decide to install a hinge-style upper radiator mount in addition to the Breeze Lower Mount. Because this uses a piano-style hinge and the same Aluminum Rivets, I buy the readily available parts at our local hardware store. Only a little modification is necessary.



Careful fitment and marking holes for rivets, we get those drilled out and ready for the hinge.



I attach the hinge to the upper radiator support frame rail with some silicone and rivets.



Next step is attaching the radiator to the piano hinge. I find myself running out of rivets. Luckily I have enough to at least finish the Radiator.







I just temp in the bottom bolt, I’m not exactly sure that I’m ready to cinch the bottom support in yet.

After all that fuss and work, I’m not taking a chance on accidental damage to the radiator. I take a piece of cardboard and tape it over the radiator front.






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i highly recommend a heater

Just saw this thread for the first time. Saw early on where you discounted the need for a heater. I feel that the single best option choice I made was for that heater. I don't think the defroster vents have much utility in the open cockpit, so directed two outputs to each footbox (ordering two extra ball vents from Vintage Air). Not entirely effective at freeway 70 mph travel, but awesome on around town trips and country roads. Extends the comfortable driving season on both ends. I also installed the 4 port Ranger bypass valve to curtail hot water flow to the heater box when you don't need the heater on. YMMV
 

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Exactly what Rick said. I set mine up identically. there are many times I would have hesitated to take the car out had I not had the heater to trim the cabin temperature for myself or my passenger. I have the standard factory 5 heater with a 4 way valve as required for my coyote. To test the effectiveness of the heater I just ran a piece of the supplied ducting tube across to the driver side and poked it into the foot box. As the heater box is mounted directly above the foot box on the passenger side I simply attached a couple of small lengths of duct pointing downwards into the foot box. All is hidden by the dashboard. Well the testing worked so perfectly that I've never bothered doing anything else with it.

In my opinion, anyone sitting on the fence regarding the heater option for their roadster, I would say having a heater is essential as having a comfortable seat.

Cheers, Nigel in South Oz
 

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Discussion Starter #238
A couple weeks ago I experience my first self-inflicted setback. I snapped a brake Tee fitting, the one by the DS front wheel. I’ve had to redo items in a more quality manner, but I don’t think I’ve really broken something before, and this was something I considered buttoned up. I really didn’t want a brake line issue.

What started it was me noticing we had a small leak of brake fluid down to the bottom of the loop by the DS front tire. I checked the brake line flare nuts and they were just fine, and the flex line seemed nice and tight on the flex adaptor. Then I checked the flex adaptor where it tightens onto the male side of the Tee. I found out the flex line adaptor was a little looser on the male tee leg than it should be so I tightened it up, altogether about a quarter turn. Then comes the mistake.

I went ahead and tightened it more, thinking it should be good with that. The problem is , in my work life I have always used brass flare fittings. Brass fittings are strong and I would not be able to snap a flare leg off, at worst maybe deform it. But these are steel inverse flare fittings..... evidently not as resistant to torquing. The end result is that I tightened until it decided to snap right off. Whoops. I was aghast, as you can probably imagine.

I had to pull the tee out, clean up the brake fluid, run all around town finding another tee, replace it, retighten everything, and re-bleed the brakes. What a fiasco. Luckily the brake fluid didn’t all bleed out of the reservoir while I had the fitting disconnected. The best place to find the Tees? Not at the specialty store that I had been shopping at. Advance Auto Parts, begins the counter. Color me surprised.

All good, back to normal now, no leak. Although I’m paranoid now, and I check the brake pedal pressure every time I sit into the car to work on it. Although I am going to have to clean and re-touch the POR15 on the frame where it sat for a little while without me noticing.








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Discussion Starter #239 (Edited)
Just saw this thread for the first time. Saw early on where you discounted the need for a heater. I feel that the single best option choice I made was for that heater. I don't think the defroster vents have much utility in the open cockpit, so directed two outputs to each footbox (ordering two extra ball vents from Vintage Air). Not entirely effective at freeway 70 mph travel, but awesome on around town trips and country roads. Extends the comfortable driving season on both ends. I also installed the 4 port Ranger bypass valve to curtail hot water flow to the heater box when you don't need the heater on. YMMV


Appreciate the input, guys. What made the decision for me with a heater (and wipers) is our climate in the PNW and the decision that this will be a sunny-day-only vehicle. Here in Vancouver we are about 60 miles from the coast. We have about 3 months of sunshine (mostly) and the rest of the year we have a marine layer that brings a decent amount of moisture in from the Pacific. It’s not like SoCal, where the marine push brings temperament to the normally-desert climate. Here it brings about 6 months of drizzle-rain-drizzle, and about 3 months of partly sunny/could be raining weather. I DO NOT want to be washing this car and polishing it 7-10 months out of the year. I will trot it out in the summer, and in October and March/April when we get fully sunny days with no chance of rain. This car will likely never see a drop of rain. Which means it typically won’t see the cold weather. I am installing heated seats for the cool mornings when we plan a trip on a sunny day, and those trips will be highway/freeway miles. So ‘cabin’ temp won’t be able to be maintained.



Just the way I’ll treat this car....... not going to be a trailer queen, but it will always be under a cover and if I make good decisions, it’ll only see sunny days.


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Discussion Starter #240
Starting in on the wiring. I’ll start with the Coyote Control Pack. Opening the box, I see the parts I need, along with some that I don’t. Shame I had to pay for those others, maybe I’ll try to Craigslist the leftovers.



I’ll end up using the PCM, Coyote Wiring Harness, exhaust sensors.




The Control Pack comes with a new Preprogrammed PCM unit, so I’ll use this one in place of the one from the Donor. I pull the old one that I had temped in and replace it with the new one. As I stand inside the engine compartment I see two things from the perspective that will be seen when the car is completed. There is still a little ink on the inside surface of the aluminum PCM mount and the nuts with bolt shaft make an appearance in the engine compartment. I think it would look better with just the bolt heads on the inside. I clean the aluminum with a little acetone and flip the bolts around. The bolts may be a minor detail, but I think the details count.



I unroll the wiring harness and examine the connectors to see about routing. I am trying to keep as much of the harness intact, at leas the part that is inside the engine compartment. I’m sure I’ll tear up the portion that’s behind the dash to fit it how I want it.

It appears that the PCM connector doesn’t like twisting and only wants to connect one way. I think I’m fine running it on the inter side of the frame rail to give it a look of continuity.



I hang it in place for now because I want it to end up looking straight when the Power Distribution box is mounted. I drill a couple holes for nutserts in the 2x2 frame rail and pop a couple nutserts in. A couple 1/4-20 bolts with washers and the PDB is mounted.









Now to reorient the wiring harness so that the dash part makes it through. I already have two holes through the dash. Based on the length of the harness leg and the hole location I choose to enlarge the Driver’s Side hole. Debate topic? Does it look better to line up the top of the two holes or the bottom if they are not the same size? Well, I chose to align the tops. Out comes the hydraulic punch, and it makes a nice clean hole, no mess.









To Be Continued......


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