FFCars.com : Factory Five Racing Discussion Forum - Reply to Topic
Thread: Drilling holes made easy Reply to Thread
Title:
Message:
Trackback:
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces) :
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 
 
 

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the FFCars.com : Factory Five Racing Discussion Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










  Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

  Topic Review (Newest First)
10-01-2019 10:51 PM
zilverx I used both #30 drill bits and 1/8" double ended bits from McMaster Carr. The #30 makes it easy to place rivets, but the double enders seem sturdier (because they're shorter ?), are cheap and give you two sharp ends to keep drilling, and drilling and ...
09-23-2019 05:40 PM
Danner Air powered drill and one high quality 1/8" bit did most of the work for me. Having the drill get cooler the harder you worked it really upped the marathon speed. Lighter than electric too. cup of oil to dip the drill bit into after each hole, and you're talking about multiple holes per minute. The only issue was having the right pressure to stop the bit before it slammed into the other wall of steel tubing, I got used to hearing when the bit was about to go through so I could ease up the pressure. Then it's just a matter of marking the holes beforehand, and having clecos handy - I made an apron with big pockets to hold clecos and the pliers.
09-21-2019 03:38 AM
GWL I have found these bits to be superb. Made for the aircraft industry of Cobalt. Yes, use the wire gauge drills (#30 for the 1/8" bit). At less than $1.00 a bit, you have to buy a pack of 12. You will not run out of these and will have many left over for other work.

Rarely did I break a bit and I've drilled a lot of holes into stainless steel that I've used on my car. Both footboxes and the firewall are of .050" mirrored stainless steel with a bunch more holes than in the standard footboxes and firewall. See the link in my signature.

https://www.panamericantool.com/cobalt-drills.html

They also have other high quality cutting tools and drills and more.

Sorry Jaga, but that method for drilling holes would be a bit awkward for me, I'm glad it worked out for you.

George
09-20-2019 11:32 PM
picah Not wanting to highjack from the OP, but as pointed out by many folks, a #30 drill bit can be a help as it is a few thousandths larger than a 1/8th. Didn't think it would make a difference until I tried it -- just helps get the rivets seated a bit easier and the 1/8 clecos still work fine. Yes - more expensive but a couple bucks saved time having to redrill a bunch of holes. OOMV.
Best
Ron
09-20-2019 05:35 PM
Avalanche325 1/8" drill bit, so no big deal. But you are bypassing the "let the tool do the work" part. Taking too big of a bite invites breaking the bit.

Small drill bits should to be run fast, large bits should be run slow.

Also, cranking down until you almost stop your drill will burn it out.
09-20-2019 01:23 AM
Jaga Itís mostly the quick grip one handed bar clamp. Itís way less effort and I have found this method to be much quicker. The trick is to squeeze the hand clamp you until it almost stop the drill. You can exert so much force that the metal will just peel off the bit. See video link below. I could use the clamp for almost every hole that was not vertical. For vertical holes I would use my body weight on top of the drill.

09-18-2019 08:39 PM
swwebb10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaga View Post
This may already have been posted or perhaps is obvious but I found using a simple quick grip one handed bar clamp with a nice slow drill speed turned minutes of drilling holes into seconds. I also bought an inexpensive drill bit sharpener and a bunch on 1/8Ē titanium bits. Your going to break some bits. Happy drilling...
What am I missing? "turned minutes of drilling holes into seconds"? Using a slow drill speed?
09-18-2019 06:03 PM
Slord 1/8 bits are cheap though. Just buy a pant load on the first sale and have done with. I use them a lot for screw pilot holes on other projects too.
09-16-2019 11:05 PM
Avalanche325 I did about 90% of my panels with one bit that I bought on-line with my Clecos. I meant to order 10, but did 1 by mistake. It was getting to be a quest to see if I could make it all the way. Then I punched through a panel and hit a round part of the frame and snapped it. I'll be that I went through another 10 - 12 from Home Depot for the other 10%.
09-16-2019 04:48 PM
NiceGuyEddie I wish I knew about lube earlier.
09-14-2019 06:15 PM
Jaga Also, i found this 90 degree drill attachment very handy for tight spaces.
09-14-2019 05:05 PM
Real time recon Step drill bit,one size fits all
https://www.homedepot.com/b/Tools-Po...s/N-5yc1vZc90q
09-14-2019 03:38 PM
egchewy Harbor freight sells double ended bits, so you can just flip it around when you break a bit.
09-14-2019 03:04 PM
Jaga
Drilling holes made easy

This may already have been posted or perhaps is obvious but I found using a simple quick grip one handed bar clamp with a nice slow drill speed turned minutes of drilling holes into seconds. I also bought an inexpensive drill bit sharpener and a bunch on 1/8Ē titanium bits. Your going to break some bits. Happy drilling...

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome

 

Welcome to FFCars! The representations expressed are the representations and opinions of the FFCars.com forum members and do not necessarily reflect the opinions and viewpoints of the site owners, moderators, Factory Five Racing, Inc. or Ford Motor Company. This website has been planned and developed by FFCars.com and its forum members and should not be construed as being endorsed by Factory Five Racing, Inc. or Ford Motor Company for any purpose. "FFR", "Factory Five", "Factory Five Racing", and the Factory Five Racing logo are registered trademarks of Factory Five Racing, Inc. FFCars.com forum members agree not to post any copyrighted material unless the copyrighted material is owned by you. Although we do not and cannot review the messages posted and are not responsible for the content of any of these messages, we reserve the right to delete any message for any reason whatsoever. You remain solely responsible for the content of your messages, and you agree to indemnify and hold us harmless with respect to any claim based upon transmission of your message(s). Thank you for visiting the FFCars.com Forum dedicated to Factory Five.