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  Topic Review (Newest First)
11-03-2019 10:27 PM
IsaacW
2015 Donor Mk4 Roadster w/IRS, First Build - Input Welcome, Many Questions.

Iíve had a few personal items taking up time lately, so Iíve been a little light on the updates, but here we go.

Engine Cooling continued.

For expansion tank mounting, I decide to use Edwardbís method with two upper mounts attached to the radiator crossbar and a lower support/stabilizer on the Breeze radiator shroud. Mock-up first ....



I ordered some 1/8x3/4Ē steel bar stock online, cut a couple of pieces to length and put a bend in them to bring them to level with the ground. After drilling rivet holes in the supports and applying some POR15 black, I drill for rivets and after verifying spacing, pop in the rivets. After temping the radiator back in I mark the location of the bottom support. I opt for 1/4Ē rivnuts for the upper supports and mark those holes as well.



For the lower support I cut a short piece of the bar stock and bent to the correct angle. Then I cut a few small pieces as filler to rivet together and form the size needed to fill in the lower support on the expansion tank. After epoxying and riveting it together, we rivet it into place and apply some black POR15.



After letting that dry, we drilled the holes and seated the rivnuts in the upper supports. The bottom support just sits on the bottom bracket. With the supports completed, we install the expansion tank and check it for flex.



One of my concerns was that the tank would flex or bounce as the car would drive over bumps or potholes. It turns out as I tested the tank for flexion up and down, itís actually quite sturdy. The way the bottom support is designed, the foot of it hooks around the bottom support I made and holds it pretty securely.

Next are the hose connections. There is 1 coolant hose that runs from the top of the engine to the back of the tank. It comes off off the engine as a 1/4Ē hose, and connects to the coolant tank as a 3/8ths hose. I found a brass barbed reducer fitting at the hardware store (not cheap!) and threw a couple of hose clamps on it. I located this fitting under the engine cover so it would be invisible after final assembly.



I know you see more going on in that picture, but bear with me. Iíll get there.

The hose coming from the front of the expansion tank also has a coupling in it, and this one has an explanation behind it. The hose that I originally ordered from Tasca Parts is the OEM hose FR3Z-8075-C that Iíve been told has a Ford-engineered one-way valve. After I placed the order, Tasca replaced that part number with an Ďupdated part numberí JL3Z-8075-C. After receipt of this newer hose, I determined it does not have an integral one-way valve, but seems to be otherwise identical. Upon installation I find the hose to be a little torqued and stretched in order to make it to the radiator fitting. So I looked around and found a piece of hose from my donor mustang that fit well and cut and spliced the two together to make a hose that is long enough to fit without stretching, and the fitting allows my to turn the hose without torquing. Because the hose runs a little close to the frame rail and the radiator, I opt to cover it with some flexible hose sheath and put a strap on it.





The Tank Cap installed readily, but ran into a hiccup there. The first one I bought from the local Autozone came apart after I put it in for the first time. They replaced it no questions asked, but it was a bear getting the inner part out and I put a nick or two in the top of the tank. Grr.



One last hose connection for the expansion tank is the hose connection under the tank. This one connects to the coolant stub that sticks straight out the front of the engine and F5 supplies a cap for in the Coyote kit. F5ís coolant scheme is a little different from the OEM scheme that we are basically mirroring.





Had to really work that last one hard to get those two ends on.

So just some hose clamps and straps to install, and we will be buttoned up with the coolant system. No cabin heater so we donít have to worry about that.

Now to fill it with Coolant.






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10-06-2019 07:26 PM
IsaacW
2015 Donor Mk4 Roadster w/IRS, First Build - Input Welcome, Many Questions.

The Engine Cooling system and the Power Steering systems have taken a back seat, but with the wiring momentarily stalling while waiting on parts, time to return to those.

Cooling first. Taking edwardbís advice I ordered the Moroso Coyote expansion tank, and followed his basic support method, but Iíll get to that a little later.

Earlier in the build I went ahead and installed the radiator complete with hinges upper support..... may have been a little premature there. In order to have good access to install the cooling and power steering systems, I decide to de-mount the radiator. I also have to complete the radiator assembly with the additional parts I ordered.

Initially I didnít like the design of the Breeze radiator shroud due to the limited coil surface area the fan cutout covers. Having done HVAC for 8 years before I did electrical, I know that limiting the coil surface reduces air flow over the coil eliminating optimal heat transfer and creating hot spots fairly close to cool spots and stressing the metal. Aluminum is fragile as it is. However, when you consider the thousands or hundreds of thousand of radiators on the road without widespread issue, you start to reconsider idealism versus pragmatism.

In a nutshell, I changed my mind and ordered the Breeze radiator support. I also ordered a Power Steering Cooler to mount on the underside of the radiator shroud.



After mocking up the shroud, cooler, and fan, I decide to mount the cooler under the shroud as this seems to be the only spot that hot air will not be flowing over the cooler. Due to the profile of the body and frame, if anything hits it, thereís more serious issues I will have to deal with.





After assembling we temp it in.... will take it back out again in a minute.





While the radiator is in place I take the time to piece together the tubing and mock up the expansion tank so that after Iím done with the Power Steering assembly I can just put all the pieces together.

The upper hose that comes with the Coyote Control pack almost connects the engine output to the radiator .... it would just need to be about 6Ē longer and have about a 22-1/2 degree bend. Cutting the end off another hose I had laying around turns out to be the perfect angle, I just need a coupler.





I pick up a hose coupling at the hardware store and make the connection. If I slide the friction sleeve over the coupling, they will never know ......





Upper hose taken care of, time to move to the lower hose. I have all this flexible stainless hose from the base kit, and couplers, this should be a great time to use them for the run from the thermostat housing over to the radiator. This run involves a few bends that are easily made. I will have to install one clamp where it passes under the body cross-member so that it doesnít rub or bang on the frame.








You can see I also put a piece of hose in there at the thermostat housing, I may try to see it the stainless hose will mount straight on the housing in order to eliminate the additional joint. The fewer joints, the better. I get the feeling that the clearance to the steering column will make that decision for me. Iíll report back later.






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10-04-2019 08:36 PM
IsaacW After calls to Factory Five, they went above and beyond the call of duty (in my opinion) and shipped me a new Oil Temp gauge minus the old(?) two-wire connector. I received that yesterday and will be replacing that one this weekend. Will also have more pictures of my dash back wiring.

I ordered my fuel pressure gauge from Speedhut, and contacted them to make sure that gauge also has the new LED backlight. I almost wish I had that in hand now, so I could install the pressure sender in the fuel line and be done with that.

More this weekend.


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09-27-2019 07:49 AM
IsaacW
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nigel Allen View Post
Hi Isaac,

I can tell you exactly why the LED backlighting does not dim via the headlight switch. It is because the LEDs don't draw anywhere near as much current as conventional incandescent globe backlighting does. The roadster's dimmer circuit consists of a rheostat in series with the back lighting circuit. This rheostat is used to drop the voltage and hence reduce the brightness of the globes in the back lighting circuit. Using ohm's law, the more current that you pass through the rheostat the more that the voltage will be dropped. The current drawn by the LEDs is so negligible that there is virtually no voltage drop across the rheostat and therefore no dimming.
Hope that make sense.
One solution is to add a dummy load in parallel with the backlighting circuit. You could use a resistor or maybe a 5 to 10 watt globe. I really don't like the solution as it is both in efficient and generates a reasonable amount of heat that needs to be dissipated somewhere.
A simple solution is to experiment with fixed value 5 watt resistors until you find one that gives adequate dimming. you could install a three position toggle switch that would give you 3 levels of dimming.
PM me if you need help.

Cheers,
Nigel in South Oz

Although you might be frustrated at the moment, I think the change to LEDs will be a blessing as inverters can give trouble.


I do understand Ohms law, being an electrician, so Iím very familiar with the mathematical relationship that voltage, amperage and resistant have. The issue you describe is exactly like we used to have with LED lamps in residential fixtures, so I grasp that no problem. I share your dim (pun) view of the additional load solution you mentioned. I will wait until F5 gets back with me, and I wonít try to fire up the lights until I get word from either them or Speedhut. Im not in a huge hurry at this point.... I have other portions of the build Iím working on.


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09-27-2019 03:39 AM
Nigel Allen It certainly does seem that speedhut's website hasn't kept up with their offerings. Paul's Autometer find is a likely solution. Basically an adjustable voltage regulator such as the LM317t will give you what is needed. there are online sellers who sell these already built up on a PCB with the necessary support electronics.
Isaac, you mentioned that the gauges were very bright. Perhaps don't run the backlighting until you get a response from speedhut. I would hazard a guess that they are designed to have a regulator installed. Most regulators even when turned on fully usually drop a couple of volts across the circuit. Therefore the gauges may be designed to only run on circa 10 volts.

Cheers Nigel in South Oz
09-27-2019 03:00 AM
edwardb
Quote:
Originally Posted by IsaacW View Post
Called Factory Five and evidently the gauge set has been redesigned recently enough that the Engineering Team at F5 hadn’t gotten wind of it. The new ones are LED backlit by the car’s 12V and don’t have the black 2-wire inverter-powered Harness or connectors. Just the 3-wire black-white-red Power Harness. They are having Speedhut ship me a Oil Temp gauge that matches, but they don’t have enough info to tell me why the gauges don’t dim with the Headlight Switch and are super bright. They will be getting back to me with updated info.
Wow, interesting stuff. Factory Five didn't know about the change, and after poking around a bit on Speedhut's website, nothing mentioned there either. All the instructions still show the inverter setup. It should be possible to have a dimmer on the LED backlighting. DD's have been using LED's that dim in instrument clusters for years. (Used to work for one of the world's largest suppliers...) But Nigel is right. The dimmer knob on the Delco style headlight switch is definitely old school and is varying voltage in a range for incandescent bulbs. The LED's probably stay lit all the way down to the lowest setting, then just switch off. Will be interesting to see what Speedhut comes up with. I can't believe they would just write off having dimmable backlighting. Auto Meter has a module made for this. https://www.autometer.com/led-lighting-dimmer.html. Suspect it would work. But better to see what Speedhut recommends. Obviously will be of interest to many builders going forward since Speedhut gauges are frequently selected for these builds.
09-27-2019 12:29 AM
Nigel Allen Hi Isaac,

I can tell you exactly why the LED backlighting does not dim via the headlight switch. It is because the LEDs don't draw anywhere near as much current as conventional incandescent globe backlighting does. The roadster's dimmer circuit consists of a rheostat in series with the back lighting circuit. This rheostat is used to drop the voltage and hence reduce the brightness of the globes in the back lighting circuit. Using ohm's law, the more current that you pass through the rheostat the more that the voltage will be dropped. The current drawn by the LEDs is so negligible that there is virtually no voltage drop across the rheostat and therefore no dimming.
Hope that make sense.
One solution is to add a dummy load in parallel with the backlighting circuit. You could use a resistor or maybe a 5 to 10 watt globe. I really don't like the solution as it is both in efficient and generates a reasonable amount of heat that needs to be dissipated somewhere.
A simple solution is to experiment with fixed value 5 watt resistors until you find one that gives adequate dimming. you could install a three position toggle switch that would give you 3 levels of dimming.
PM me if you need help.

Cheers,
Nigel in South Oz

Although you might be frustrated at the moment, I think the change to LEDs will be a blessing as inverters can give trouble.
09-26-2019 11:31 PM
IsaacW Called Factory Five and evidently the gauge set has been redesigned recently enough that the Engineering Team at F5 hadnít gotten wind of it. The new ones are LED backlit by the carís 12V and donít have the black 2-wire inverter-powered Harness or connectors. Just the 3-wire black-white-red Power Harness. They are having Speedhut ship me a Oil Temp gauge that matches, but they donít have enough info to tell me why the gauges donít dim with the Headlight Switch and are super bright. They will be getting back to me with updated info.


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09-26-2019 04:18 AM
IsaacW Copy, thanks for the info. I appreciate it. Iíll post a pic too, for you to check it out.


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09-26-2019 01:34 AM
edwardb I've used those Vintage gauges multiple times, and first I've heard/seen there not being separate 2-wire connectors for the gauge backlighting. Seems like something has changed and I can't explain it. The gauges I've used required the inverter you're describing for the backlighting. The electroluminscent backlighting required AC, so wouldn't light if DC were used like it seems you're doing by putting the lighting +12V through the 3-wire harness. The needles are LED and are powered through the 3-wire harness. Can't explain it. First call to Factory Five, and likely second will be to Speedhut.

For the hazards, if you ground that pink wire you'll pop the fuse. So no, that's not correct. That wire is a battery powered +12V (e.g. hot all the time) and is alternately switched to the turn signals on four corners through the double pole switch shown on the RF schematic.
09-26-2019 12:02 AM
IsaacW Two wiring questions for the senior builders. Iím used to high voltage electrical and can read schematics just fine, and the F5 diagrams are leaving me wanting.

First question is on the Vintage GPS gauge set. The instructions show a gauge set with a separate two-wire plug for the gauge backlighting on each gauge, and the Gauge set that I received only has the 3-wire connector with the red-white-black wires. The one exception is the oil temp gauge which I ordered from F5 in addition to the Vintage Gauge set. It has the separate 2-wire harness. As a result, the multi-feed dimmer harness that I have only feeds the oil temp gauge. The result is that I can dim the oil temp gauge but the rest of the gauges are always on suuuuuper bright, significantly brighter than the oil temp gauge, and they donít dim with the Headlight Switch turning. Is there a solution for this? I donít think Iím missing anything, but do I go on like this forever? I feel like itís kind of cobbled together and mismatched, and I want it to be right.

I took one pic of the dash in the dark to show the difference in brightness. The oil temp gauge, which I feel is the only one operating correctly, is the the upper middle gauge in the center cluster.



The second issue is the hazard lights. Call me ignorant on this one. In order to actuate the lights, do I essentially just need to take the pink Ďhazardsí wire in the dash harness to ground? I may have just answered my own question, and I will test that on my own later today. Input appreciated on both.


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09-24-2019 05:35 PM
IsaacW
Quote:
Originally Posted by edwardb View Post
Sorry, meant to respond about that one too. Not much you're going to do about the placement of the attachment. All Mk3 and Mk4's have been that way since FF went away from the single attachment point. The kit includes some plastic edging to put around the opening. Or many of use these seat belt trim plates to smooth out the edge. Plus they look better. I haven't seen any wear on my Mk4 harness after three driving seasons. I really don't think it's an issue for routine use. In the event of a collision, agree it's maybe less than optimal. But I personally don't see any chance that's going to shear the belt. If it does, afraid there are bigger problems to deal with. Just don't ever find out.


Excellent, will order two pairs of those. Appreciate that.


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09-24-2019 02:58 AM
edwardb
Quote:
Originally Posted by IsaacW View Post
I was looking for input on the restraint strap placement, and the sharp-edge and/or shear force put on it by the cockpit metal edge.
Sorry, meant to respond about that one too. Not much you're going to do about the placement of the attachment. All Mk3 and Mk4's have been that way since FF went away from the single attachment point. The kit includes some plastic edging to put around the opening. Or many of use these seat belt trim plates to smooth out the edge. Plus they look better. I haven't seen any wear on my Mk4 harness after three driving seasons. I really don't think it's an issue for routine use. In the event of a collision, agree it's maybe less than optimal. But I personally don't see any chance that's going to shear the belt. If it does, afraid there are bigger problems to deal with. Just don't ever find out.
09-24-2019 12:28 AM
IsaacW
2015 Donor Mk4 Roadster w/IRS, First Build - Input Welcome, Many Questions.

Ahhh.... didnít think about the bolt strength, just durability underneath the car after completion. Iíll rethink those, and look for some button-head grade 8.

I was looking for input on the restraint strap placement, and the sharp-edge and/or shear force put on it by the cockpit metal edge.


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09-22-2019 09:55 PM
edwardb You ask for input. Hope it turns out OK, but generally not recommended to finalize the seat locations until the body is on. The upper corner of the seats, near the door latches, is pretty close to the body with the seats in their optimal position. Now that you've done it, hope for the best. But you may have to adjust them once the body is on. Also, I like bling as much as the next guy, and use my share of SS bolts. But I hope you realize those hardware store SS bolts are roughly half the strength of grade 5 hardware. I personally wouldn't use them in high stress or safety related places. And bolting the seats down would fit both categories. On a different front, I too am about 5'-10" and find with the standard Roadster seats, all the way back against the back wall is about right. Taller folks end up with different seats plus probably have to bend their legs some more.
09-22-2019 08:21 PM
IsaacW
2015 Donor Mk4 Roadster w/IRS, First Build - Input Welcome, Many Questions.

I didnít find, nor do I recall seeing the gauge dimmer in my gauge kit, so I ordered that and my fuel pressure gauge from Speedhut. The fuel gauge is supposedly 3 weeks out, but I received the dimmer assembly within a few days. Looking at it, it definitely does not ring a bell. Iíll get to that soon.

The seats are ready to install and I am moving them around unintentionally quite a bit as we work in the cockpit. Itís time to bolt them in before we damage something.

First is the fit. I find that with my 5í 10Ē frame I am comfortable operating the pedals with the seat position almost all the way back to the rear. With clutch pedal depressed fully my left leg is still slightly bent. The Leather Steering Wheel is a little closer than my daily driverís wheel, but my left arm sits comfortably with my left hand at 1 oíclock, and my right arm falls almost right on the shifter arm. I planned the seat heater wire penetrations right in the corner of the seat frame space where I anticipated placing the seat, and I have been assessing the seat fit for a while as I work on it. Time to lock it in.

One thing I have discovered in visiting others with Cobras - the seats work best when the are not mounted exactly straight with the frame. They mount at a slight outward angle to align the legs with the foot boxes.

First step is to clean the cockpit floor. It has accumulated some metal shavings, dust, and other junk. Gotta have a clean area. Just in time to dirty it up. Hehe. We take the vacuum cleaner to it.



We place the seats in place, and gauge good bolt locations. The manual does not lay out exact or required bolt locations, but I do some reading to see where others have drilled them in, and settle on these spots.

.

You can see I have two temps in just to hold the seat roughly in place while I drill the others through the floor.

The safety harnesses will pose an installation challenge if I donít install them before the seats. I pull out the installation hardware included in the base kit and the harnesses. They are impressive, and sobering. The fact that these cars mandate a 5-point racing harness in order to be reasonably safe? Iíll be taking it slow at the beginning for sure. Iím considering taking a track instruction class that a friend teaches at PIR.... but thatís down the road a ways. Anyway...... I loosely bolt the side and rear straps into place. Looks like a bolt, nylock nut and two washers per strap.



After drilling the holes and temping the restraints in, more cleanup is necessary.



I save the front strap for last, as there is not a clear direction on placement except for Ď20 degrees behind the midlineí.... or something close to that. I think Iíll place them where they will touch the front of the seat when occupied. This is as far back as would be effective in the event of a crash, and should effectively keep the center latch point held down in place under normal use. This point is about 1Ē back from the 2Ē crossbar under the seatfloor at the front.



Hereís a picture of the bolts under the floor.




The Base Kit does not come with bolts to secure the seats, so a trip to the hardware store was required to buy the Button Head SS bolts, washers and Nylon Locknuts. The seats will need to come out again when I install carpet and to facilitate this and prevent galling of the SS bolt-nut combos, I use a small amount of Anti-Seize compound on the threads. Just a dab.

Make sure that the seat cushion attachment is snapped into place before you tighten the bolts, or you will have to loosen them back up to get the cushion snapped in. Not that I made that blunder, it was a friend ... yeah, a friend.

With that in place, bolts tightened down and heater wires snapped into place, we go ahead and remove the tape over the Velcro at the back. Seat cushion down.



Repeat the procedure for the other side.




Now to adjust the harnesses. I understand the latch point should be as low as comfortable across the hips while not cutting into the top of the legs. The shoulder straps require quite a bit of adjustment into the trunk in order to not have a ton of extra on the latch end.

Once both sides are complete, we lay them in place and itís looking good.



I will be using the Vinagroon method to dye the leather of the latch base and the door straps.

My only fitment question is on the outer shoulder strap on both sides. The anchor point on the frame is too close to the side panel to sit straight, so it sits a little tweaked inward. This is in conflict with the cutout in the cockpit panel, which is slightly outside of the frame rail. This creates a zig-zag in the shoulder strap that canít be good. I imagine in normal use the strap may wear on the inner contact point of the cockpit hole, and in the event of an impact the belt may tear or shear.





I have time to make possible tweaks, as the seats will be coming back out before carpet installation. No pressure.

Input would be appreciated here.






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09-16-2019 03:43 PM
IsaacW
2015 Donor Mk4 Roadster w/IRS, First Build - Input Welcome, Many Questions.

Quote:
Originally Posted by marshc56 View Post
Isaac,



Thanks for the fantastic build log. I've been following your build with some interest. Your explanations make it easy to understand the logic behind your decisions. I'm still in the project planning stages and taking lots of "notes". You're making great progress!



I used to live in Vancouver, and now reside up north (Everett). I do travel down to Portland visiting friends, and would very much like to see your build some time.



Marshall


You are welcome to come around! I do work days so let me know ahead of time if you can. Donít forget to read the builds by edwardb, he is more experienced and has great details on his and many others. I may sound like I know what Iím doing but Iíve done lots of reading on their threads.


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09-16-2019 03:35 AM
marshc56 Isaac,

Thanks for the fantastic build log. I've been following your build with some interest. Your explanations make it easy to understand the logic behind your decisions. I'm still in the project planning stages and taking lots of "notes". You're making great progress!

I used to live in Vancouver, and now reside up north (Everett). I do travel down to Portland visiting friends, and would very much like to see your build some time.

Marshall
09-14-2019 10:38 PM
IsaacW
Quote:
Originally Posted by JKleiner View Post
They aren't supposed to. The Speedhut/FFR gauge backlighting is controlled by the inverter and dimmer rheostat in their pigtail harness. And if you don't already happen to be aware the clock pointers are not lighted...guess Speedhut just figures if it's dark out you don't need to know what time it is (won't really matter 'cause Speedhut clocks are wrong most of the time anyway)



Jeff


Yeah, I looked for the inverter/rheostat and couldnít find it in the box. Iíll be coming back to that later, I may have to reorder that from Speedhut.

I am aware of the clock hands.... but I donít have the clock connected. Iím just using it as a space holder for my fuel pressure gauge until I receive it.


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09-14-2019 08:29 PM
JKleiner
Quote:
Originally Posted by IsaacW View Post
...Gauge lights donít dim with the Headlight Switch...
They aren't supposed to. The Speedhut/FFR gauge backlighting is controlled by the inverter and dimmer rheostat in their pigtail harness. And if you don't already happen to be aware the clock pointers are not lighted...guess Speedhut just figures if it's dark out you don't need to know what time it is (won't really matter 'cause Speedhut clocks are wrong most of the time anyway)

Jeff
09-14-2019 05:56 PM
IsaacW Moving toward finishing the electrical behind the dash. The Coyote Pack connections are fairly straightforward according to the CCP connection diagram and I let that connection harness sit where it naturally settled right above the steering column. I did not end up cutting the Coyote pack wires shorter, but instead created a loop of wire which worked out reasonably well with the other legs diving in and out of the convolute.






Rather messy right now, but it will clean up a bit.

I had split the main harness open to deal with the Hot Rod Leg, powering the courtesy lights, adding the power plug, turn signal and the other extras. I plug the accelerator harness into the pedal and with the connections basically done, itís a matter of getting the wires into convolute, arranged neatly and secured to eliminate drooping. The only trailers still hanging are the ignition switch, headlight switch and wires to the trunk lights.





We use a few clamps to secure the wiring in place. After connecting the trunk light wires to the other courtesy light wires, making up the convolute and securing with some clamps, we are basically done with the behind-the-dash wiring. I dry fit the dash over the steering column and check attachment points for the harness plugs. Iíve read that location of the RF Dash Harness is paramount in making up the wiring on the back of the dash. We approximate the resting location of the harness with dash on.



Time to start making up the dash wiring. I move to the kitchen table, as it has the large flat surface I need.



Laying the wiring harness in place and keeping it in place proves to be a little challenge, as the natural curl want to either more it of flip it over. I use a couple tools to hold it down.



Thereís a lot of connections to make, but most of them are straightforward according to the manual and the gauge set instructions. There are a few questions but I will address them in a later post. For now have the dash wiring mostly wrapped up.

Fitted the dash back on and clicked the connectors in. If anything is connected wrong, we will see it shortly.



Turned the Master Disconnect on, noticed the Hazard Flasher indicator light came on immediately ..... first dash wiring error, but will fix that easily. Turned the key on and .... gauges turned and whirred.... no smoke or burning smells!! No Major wiring snafus so far. Feeling good about that. Turned the garage lights off to get a better look at the backlight.



Now, the clock is not connected, so disregard that. But, the oil temp gauge is connected, but no backlight. Hmmm. MIL light is on, which I halfway expected. Gauge lights donít dim with the Headlight Switch. So a few things to address, but making progress in the right direction. Iíll add a few more pics of the back of the dash in a later post.







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08-18-2019 10:53 PM
IsaacW
2015 Donor Mk4 Roadster w/IRS, First Build - Input Welcome, Many Questions.

The CobraHeat install went fairly smoothly with a slight learning curve on the disassembly side.

Two mats to install for each seat, one for the back cushion and one for the Seat Cushion. They come with convenient adhesive strips on each side and are just about the perfect length for both cushions. They have trimming instruction, but I did not end up trimming any off either one.





The back cushion leather is held to the seat by a number of Hog Rings, and undoing specific rings allows the mat to be slid up under the back leather. The lower seat cushion leather is easy enough to separate from the cushion. The learning curve comes in on the number of Hog Rings you have to remove to get the seat back leather up enough to slide the mat in; itís fewer than I thought, and only certain ones are necessary before it will lift up to allow install.







Got the back mat installed, carefully peeled the cover off the adhesive and itís sticking in place and held by the leather. Re-secured the Leather, and now to the seat cushion.





I wrapped the mat down over the front lip of the seat cushion. Iíd rather do that than trim it. With the seat cushion mat installed, now to glue the leather back to the cushion with Landau Cement.



Painted on the cement on both the foam and the leather side strips, and allowed 30 minutes to dry. Rolled them together and let them dry.



Repeated the process with the other seat, and the heat is installed.

After drying we follow edwardbís example and install 1/4Ē aluminum bar spacers along the bottom seat rails. Great way to allow the wires to run down below without pinching. Only $18, plus rivets.





Drilled and riveted into place. One of the tougher things about this build is keeping the build area clean, especially with metal shavings and spirals from drilling. Maybe not tougher, but tedious. Iíd rather be building than cleaning, but it must be done.

The wires can now travel through without being pinched. Now to reinsert my customized controller and make sure the connections all make it without pinching. We will wait to bolt the seats in until after carpet install.




More Electrical to follow.

Just received my KRC Kit so installation of that is coming soon.



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08-18-2019 07:12 PM
IsaacW
2015 Donor Mk4 Roadster w/IRS, First Build - Input Welcome, Many Questions.

Engine electrical connections done, I return to the Main Harness wiring. Itís not necessarily complicated but it would be rather lengthy going over everything I did, but Iíll try to hit all the important points.

Perhaps redundant, but the items that I chose to bring together are the Russ Thompson Turn Signal, CobraHeat heated seats, third party hazard and high beam switches, F5 Headlight and ignition switches, under-dash start-enable button, under-dash and under-frame-rail trunk courtesy lights, cigarette-lighter-style power plug, Color-coded power buses and of course the Ron Francis Main Harness.

Starting with the Hot Rod leg and Russ Thompson Turn Signal. Iím listing these two together because they relate, at least how I chose to wire it. Initially I chose to take some of the convolute off, trace the Hot Rod Leg wires back to the Dash Harness interconnect plug, and cut those wires off about 1Ē shy of the plug. I covered the ends of the wires with Heat Shrink to keep anything from shorting out. In hindsight, I would have cut the End harness off, and left the wires long. What I ended up doing was taking the turn signal wires and horn wires from the Hot Rod leg and redirecting them over toward the steering column. I installed a 6-pin Molex Plug on the Turn Signal wires and Hot Rod plug wires so that I could Quick-connect and disconnect during the install process, as we will be taking it off and putting it on several times.





I ordered a set of bus bars from Mofeez on Amazon, and installed them on top of the 2Ē crossbar. I chose to mount the negative bus directly behind the gauges and the positive behind the glove compartment are for two reasons; I need power over behind the glove compartment area and I need grounds for wiring harnesses behind the gauges.



First to mount is the ground bus in the middle. I river it to the frame and run a large bonding wire over to the 3/4Ē frame rail.





I put the main harness ground (dash side) on the end stud, and stack the bonding wire on that.



I make up the grounds with ring terminals and land them on the ground bus.



I had to be careful when doing this because the GPS Antennae wire looks a lot like a black ground wire and would have been easy to irreversibly clip right off. That could have been a small disaster.

I mount the positive bus on the passenger side.



I ran the heater power wire to the positive bus, and fed the heated Seats and the courtesy lights from there. The circuit is large enough to handle the amps from both seat heaters and the next-to-nothing amp draw from the LED courtesy lights. I wired up a custom switch setup with the factory quick-disconnect plugs for the dash switches for the heated seats and connected those to the bus.






On the seat end, I drilled and tapped the ground into the under-seat metal and used the Dremel to clear out enough material to ensure good frame contact to the Ring terminal.



More details to come.



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08-15-2019 07:04 AM
IsaacW
2015 Donor Mk4 Roadster w/IRS, First Build - Input Welcome, Many Questions.

Another order from Jegs and the suggested Moroso Coyote Expansion tank is on its way. My KRC power steering kit should be arriving soon.

I return to the Engine Electrical before wiring the dash. I have to perform a number of tasks; tach connection, sender connections, Engine Harness touch-up, fan wire connection, and fuel line.

Starting with the tach connection, the Ron Francis sender Harness already has the purple wire carrying through to the dash harness and breaks out of the sender harness near the #7 coil pack. I tie in to the purple wire that feeds that coil pack.



Next comes the senders. I pondered this a while. The sender harness is long enough to make it almost around the front of the DS head and almost down to the senders themselves. I have the water temp, oil temp and oil pressure to bring up and around. So do I bring the sender harness all the way down and around to the senders, or bring the sender cables up through some convolute and make the connections up under the engine cover? Whichever way, the wires will have to avoid the steering column and pass near the headers. The route will have to stay tight as it comes around, and I plan on sleeving the wires inside some heat shield as they pass by the headers.
I end up making the decision based on the difficulty making up the connections and then accessing them later. Making them up lower will be much more difficult and prohibitive after the build is complete, whereas if I run the cables up to the area under the engine cover, it will be a simple task to take the cover off and access those connections. I group the three cables together.....



Keep reading, itís not done .......

I pull some convolute over the three cables and sleeve some heat shield tube over the convolute. The heat generated by the header will likely make any nylon zip-ties down there brittle and crack and I opt to go with Stainless Steel zip-ties to bind them away from the header. No use taking any chances. We also ran the alternator leg of the RF harness down under the engine mount and tightened that onto the stud on the alternator.




Wrapped them up and around the front alongside the engine harness, then along the fuel rail to the connection point. Once I have the cables up there, I strip the sender cables to get down to the conductors.






From there itís just a matter of crimping all the grounds together and connecting the sensor leads, then covering it in convolute. While I am working right there, I put the fitting on the fuel line and temp it onto the fuel rail. I have an inline port fitting coming from Amazon that I will install the fuel pressure sender in at a later date.



On the passenger side of the Coyote we replaced the 1Ē convolute that had covered the engine harness between the PS valve cover and the ECU. It had gotten a little roughed up before we got ahold of it, so we replaced the loom and tape..... looks much better. Itís starting to look like an engine compartment.










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08-12-2019 11:01 PM
IsaacW
2015 Donor Mk4 Roadster w/IRS, First Build - Input Welcome, Many Questions.

Continuing down the path.... getting more gauges in place.





Almost all done with fitting, just Headlight and ignition switches to be fitment checked.



All the gauges in, final fitting before starting in on the dash wiring.



Hmm. One issue noticed, and Iíll own this with my inexperience. The foam in the ends of the bottom of the dash are showing, and I think will continue to show.



I think the best solution is going to be making the white disappear by using some Landau Cement to cover that small area with some leftover dash cover material. Any thoughts?



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08-12-2019 07:52 AM
IsaacW
2015 Donor Mk4 Roadster w/IRS, First Build - Input Welcome, Many Questions.

Before ..... you can see my bend markings, and my trim markings, at the bottom.



After...




Much better fit. No pressure. Check the other side .... how do we fit there?



Looking good on Driverís side. Now that the dash is bent appropriately, we double-check all the holes for fitment. Two of them concern me in particular, the steering wheel and the Headlight Switch. The steering wheel hole is too tall, and I donít want the dash cover dimpling in where there is no backing. I decide to cut a piece of sheet aluminum from my old Footbox front and epoxy that to the dash on the backside. Simple enough. For the Headlight Switch we use an oversized washer and a Dremel with a stone wheel to notch the inside of the washer before epoxying it into place behind the dash. I think it was a layout decision change that resulted in the incorrect hole size.



From the front ...



We let that dry, then filled in the front side with a little epoxy to bring those more flush. After sufficient drying time, we clean the surface with epoxy before Landau Cement is applied.


After triple-checking finished layout and clean surface, we use a 4Ē wide bush to apply Landau Cement to the back of the dash covering and the front of the dash surface. Drying time of 20 minutes is advised and I monitor it for tackiness and sheen. After about 20 minutes most of the two mating surfaces are dry, so itís time to apply. There was a little waviness in the dash cover material; Iím planning on using a roller to firmly roll the material both directions outward from the center. After very carefully lining the dash up with the mark on the back of the dash material, I gently rest the dash down onto the material. After some firm pressing down of the middle of the dash onto the material, I gently pick it up and turn it over. Using a tube of silicone, I start in the center and firmly roll the material outward toward the ends, including around the curved ends. Ok.... material applied, let it dry. Iíll roll the edges over after I cut out for the gauges and can pull those tabs in at the same time.



After overnight drying I mark the cutouts and start notching the dash material for rolling it over. My cutting tool is a simple box cutter, cutting from the backside, and I do have to break it a few tabs down every so often to keep the cutter sharp.



After cutting the holes out, notching them for foldover and notching the material around the edges, I apply more Landau Cement along the edge and bottom of the dash and all the way around the perimeter of the dash material, and let that dry. The stuff is smelly, use in a well ventilated area.



After drying about 30 minutes, I fold over the edge cutouts and press them into place with my ĎRollerí. Itís starting to look better.





After drying time (yeeesh...!) I start installation of the gauges and controls.











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08-12-2019 07:27 AM
IsaacW
2015 Donor Mk4 Roadster w/IRS, First Build - Input Welcome, Many Questions.

Back to The Dash for a bit. Final mock-up completed, we picked up some Landau Contact cement from the local Home Depot. In hindsight all we needed for the dash and seats would have been about 1 Cup, but we may end up using it for the carpet in which case we will probably use the majority of it. But back to the final dash mock-up.

Driverís main view. Call me weird, I want to see the speedo as my primary gauge with my left arm blocking the view of the left gauge. Force of habit for eyeball movement, and thatís the main information I want.



Middle of the dash. Gauges are in order of importance from left to right and top to bottom, roughly grouping temps and pressures close to each other. The clock will not be remaining, but will be replaced by an electronic fuel pressure gauge with a pressure sender at the fuel rail when I replace the stock fuel rail. I have the wires there waiting.



Received my Headlight Switch and ignition switch and got them temped in place. Heated seat switches ... check. Ordered a hazard light switch and high beam switch from Amazon; they are a couple toggle buttons with icons and indicator lights from what appears to be the same company under two different names. Etopar? Esupport? Ok...... anyway. That concludes my gauge and switch mock-up..... time to stop procrastinating and get the dash assembled.

To support the dash we cut 4 pieces of aluminum angle bracket and countersunk screws into the dash. Before I glue the covering on, I wanted to make sure the screws donít create any irregularities on the surface of the covering once itís done. We use some epoxy spread thinly across the screw heads and countersink divots. I let that dry overnight sitting face up to let it spread as evenly as possible.



After letting that dry, we sand the epoxy down a little to make it flush, and then we clean the surface off with acetone. More cleaning after bending and fingerprints.

So whatís next? The assembly directions donít do a great job of telling you what order to do what task in. After staring and thinking about it, I decide to first mark a sharpie reference mark on the back of the dash covering, then roll the ends of the dash and bend a 90 at the notches, paint on the Landau Cement, let it dry, and then stick the dash onto the covering and roll it together. Iím trying to avoid glueing the dash and covering it before bending it. We will see how this goes.

First I mark the covering on the white back for reference along the bottom lip of the dash. Then I grab a quart paint can and head to a long flat surface to try to roll these edges. Canít lie, Iím afraid Iíll screw up. This is what I have to curve inward.



They say you can use a paint can to roll the ends ....



Here goes. I grasp the end against the paint can and roll the two toward the center of the dash, firmly keeping the two held together.



So far so good.... itís rolling around the paint can.....



And I keep rolling until the end wraps almost completely around the can. The bend is nice and smooth.... now to bend the end 90-degrees. There are two circular notches that mark there the ends of the bend should be. My old reliable hand tongs make short work of the bend.







And there we have one end done .... repeat the process for the other end.... almost. The end of the metal at the Passenger end of the dash needs a little trimming, but just a little, and a rebend at a slightly different angle to avoid hitting the dash. In this picture the dash is putting a little pressure on the firewall.



A little snip-snip along the bottom, and my sharpie mark showing the estimated rebend angle ....



Continued....




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08-11-2019 11:46 PM
IsaacW
2015 Donor Mk4 Roadster w/IRS, First Build - Input Welcome, Many Questions.

Quote:
Originally Posted by edwardb View Post
Still not the same since the factory setup also includes a line to the top of the radiator with a one-way valve. That's part of how it keeps air out of the system. Mustangs (and our builds) have run millions of miles without blow-off caps when set up the way Ford designed. Controlling engine temp is a big deal. Altering a known working setup is risky IMO for no other reason than the aesthetics and perceived inconvenience (which it isn't) of the tank location. Good luck whatever you do.


Ahah... I must not have read enough to be aware of the one-way valve to the radiator .... Iíll re-visit that. I agree, I donít want to mess with the way Ford designed the ECU to control the engine temperature.


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08-11-2019 09:46 PM
edwardb
Quote:
Originally Posted by IsaacW View Post
Paul, I do plan on plumbing it like you did with a small line coming off the expansion port, not with a T-filler. It would end up acting as an expansion tank. I do want to use one that employs a blowoff cap, not just a cap, in case of emergency, and feeds from the bottom. A little more interesting to find.
Still not the same since the factory setup also includes a line to the top of the radiator with a one-way valve. That's part of how it keeps air out of the system. Mustangs (and our builds) have run millions of miles without blow-off caps when set up the way Ford designed. Controlling engine temp is a big deal. Altering a known working setup is risky IMO for no other reason than the aesthetics and perceived inconvenience (which it isn't) of the tank location. Good luck whatever you do.
08-11-2019 09:00 PM
IsaacW
Quote:
Originally Posted by edwardb View Post
Of course, do what you want. But kind of apples and oranges comparison. The Moroso 63806 tank you see many of us installing in Coyote builds is an expansion tank. Not a traditional gravity style overflow tank. It's installed in a similar location and plumbed exactly like a Mustang. The height it ends up at is fine because it operates via pressure. Site glass isn't an issue in my experience. Once filled, I've found it doesn't change. The tank eliminates the need for a T-filler in the top radiator hose, and makes burping air from the engine a non-issue because it does that by design. Bottom line it's a closed system that operates the Coyote exactly like Ford designed it.


Paul, I do plan on plumbing it like you did with a small line coming off the expansion port, not with a T-filler. It would end up acting as an expansion tank. I do want to use one that employs a blowoff cap, not just a cap, in case of emergency, and feeds from the bottom. A little more interesting to find.


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