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  Topic Review (Newest First)
08-18-2019 09:53 PM
IsaacW
2015 Donor Mk4 Roadster w/IRS, First Build - Input Welcome, Many Questions.

The CobraHeat install went fairly smoothly with a slight learning curve on the disassembly side.

Two mats to install for each seat, one for the back cushion and one for the Seat Cushion. They come with convenient adhesive strips on each side and are just about the perfect length for both cushions. They have trimming instruction, but I did not end up trimming any off either one.





The back cushion leather is held to the seat by a number of Hog Rings, and undoing specific rings allows the mat to be slid up under the back leather. The lower seat cushion leather is easy enough to separate from the cushion. The learning curve comes in on the number of Hog Rings you have to remove to get the seat back leather up enough to slide the mat in; itís fewer than I thought, and only certain ones are necessary before it will lift up to allow install.







Got the back mat installed, carefully peeled the cover off the adhesive and itís sticking in place and held by the leather. Re-secured the Leather, and now to the seat cushion.





I wrapped the mat down over the front lip of the seat cushion. Iíd rather do that than trim it. With the seat cushion mat installed, now to glue the leather back to the cushion with Landau Cement.



Painted on the cement on both the foam and the leather side strips, and allowed 30 minutes to dry. Rolled them together and let them dry.



Repeated the process with the other seat, and the heat is installed.

After drying we follow edwardbís example and install 1/4Ē aluminum bar spacers along the bottom seat rails. Great way to allow the wires to run down below without pinching. Only $18, plus rivets.





Drilled and riveted into place. One of the tougher things about this build is keeping the build area clean, especially with metal shavings and spirals from drilling. Maybe not tougher, but tedious. Iíd rather be building than cleaning, but it must be done.

The wires can now travel through without being pinched. Now to reinsert my customized controller and make sure the connections all make it without pinching. We will wait to bolt the seats in until after carpet install.




More Electrical to follow.

Just received my KRC Kit so installation of that is coming soon.



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08-18-2019 06:12 PM
IsaacW
2015 Donor Mk4 Roadster w/IRS, First Build - Input Welcome, Many Questions.

Engine electrical connections done, I return to the Main Harness wiring. Itís not necessarily complicated but it would be rather lengthy going over everything I did, but Iíll try to hit all the important points.

Perhaps redundant, but the items that I chose to bring together are the Russ Thompson Turn Signal, CobraHeat heated seats, third party hazard and high beam switches, F5 Headlight and ignition switches, under-dash start-enable button, under-dash and under-frame-rail trunk courtesy lights, cigarette-lighter-style power plug, Color-coded power buses and of course the Ron Francis Main Harness.

Starting with the Hot Rod leg and Russ Thompson Turn Signal. Iím listing these two together because they relate, at least how I chose to wire it. Initially I chose to take some of the convolute off, trace the Hot Rod Leg wires back to the Dash Harness interconnect plug, and cut those wires off about 1Ē shy of the plug. I covered the ends of the wires with Heat Shrink to keep anything from shorting out. In hindsight, I would have cut the End harness off, and left the wires long. What I ended up doing was taking the turn signal wires and horn wires from the Hot Rod leg and redirecting them over toward the steering column. I installed a 6-pin Molex Plug on the Turn Signal wires and Hot Rod plug wires so that I could Quick-connect and disconnect during the install process, as we will be taking it off and putting it on several times.





I ordered a set of bus bars from Mofeez on Amazon, and installed them on top of the 2Ē crossbar. I chose to mount the negative bus directly behind the gauges and the positive behind the glove compartment are for two reasons; I need power over behind the glove compartment area and I need grounds for wiring harnesses behind the gauges.



First to mount is the ground bus in the middle. I river it to the frame and run a large bonding wire over to the 3/4Ē frame rail.





I put the main harness ground (dash side) on the end stud, and stack the bonding wire on that.



I make up the grounds with ring terminals and land them on the ground bus.



I had to be careful when doing this because the GPS Antennae wire looks a lot like a black ground wire and would have been easy to irreversibly clip right off. That could have been a small disaster.

I mount the positive bus on the passenger side.



I ran the heater power wire to the positive bus, and fed the heated Seats and the courtesy lights from there. The circuit is large enough to handle the amps from both seat heaters and the next-to-nothing amp draw from the LED courtesy lights. I wired up a custom switch setup with the factory quick-disconnect plugs for the dash switches for the heated seats and connected those to the bus.






On the seat end, I drilled and tapped the ground into the under-seat metal and used the Dremel to clear out enough material to ensure good frame contact to the Ring terminal.



More details to come.



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08-15-2019 06:04 AM
IsaacW
2015 Donor Mk4 Roadster w/IRS, First Build - Input Welcome, Many Questions.

Another order from Jegs and the suggested Moroso Coyote Expansion tank is on its way. My KRC power steering kit should be arriving soon.

I return to the Engine Electrical before wiring the dash. I have to perform a number of tasks; tach connection, sender connections, Engine Harness touch-up, fan wire connection, and fuel line.

Starting with the tach connection, the Ron Francis sender Harness already has the purple wire carrying through to the dash harness and breaks out of the sender harness near the #7 coil pack. I tie in to the purple wire that feeds that coil pack.



Next comes the senders. I pondered this a while. The sender harness is long enough to make it almost around the front of the DS head and almost down to the senders themselves. I have the water temp, oil temp and oil pressure to bring up and around. So do I bring the sender harness all the way down and around to the senders, or bring the sender cables up through some convolute and make the connections up under the engine cover? Whichever way, the wires will have to avoid the steering column and pass near the headers. The route will have to stay tight as it comes around, and I plan on sleeving the wires inside some heat shield as they pass by the headers.
I end up making the decision based on the difficulty making up the connections and then accessing them later. Making them up lower will be much more difficult and prohibitive after the build is complete, whereas if I run the cables up to the area under the engine cover, it will be a simple task to take the cover off and access those connections. I group the three cables together.....



Keep reading, itís not done .......

I pull some convolute over the three cables and sleeve some heat shield tube over the convolute. The heat generated by the header will likely make any nylon zip-ties down there brittle and crack and I opt to go with Stainless Steel zip-ties to bind them away from the header. No use taking any chances. We also ran the alternator leg of the RF harness down under the engine mount and tightened that onto the stud on the alternator.




Wrapped them up and around the front alongside the engine harness, then along the fuel rail to the connection point. Once I have the cables up there, I strip the sender cables to get down to the conductors.






From there itís just a matter of crimping all the grounds together and connecting the sensor leads, then covering it in convolute. While I am working right there, I put the fitting on the fuel line and temp it onto the fuel rail. I have an inline port fitting coming from Amazon that I will install the fuel pressure sender in at a later date.



On the passenger side of the Coyote we replaced the 1Ē convolute that had covered the engine harness between the PS valve cover and the ECU. It had gotten a little roughed up before we got ahold of it, so we replaced the loom and tape..... looks much better. Itís starting to look like an engine compartment.










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08-12-2019 10:01 PM
IsaacW
2015 Donor Mk4 Roadster w/IRS, First Build - Input Welcome, Many Questions.

Continuing down the path.... getting more gauges in place.





Almost all done with fitting, just Headlight and ignition switches to be fitment checked.



All the gauges in, final fitting before starting in on the dash wiring.



Hmm. One issue noticed, and Iíll own this with my inexperience. The foam in the ends of the bottom of the dash are showing, and I think will continue to show.



I think the best solution is going to be making the white disappear by using some Landau Cement to cover that small area with some leftover dash cover material. Any thoughts?



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08-12-2019 06:52 AM
IsaacW
2015 Donor Mk4 Roadster w/IRS, First Build - Input Welcome, Many Questions.

Before ..... you can see my bend markings, and my trim markings, at the bottom.



After...




Much better fit. No pressure. Check the other side .... how do we fit there?



Looking good on Driverís side. Now that the dash is bent appropriately, we double-check all the holes for fitment. Two of them concern me in particular, the steering wheel and the Headlight Switch. The steering wheel hole is too tall, and I donít want the dash cover dimpling in where there is no backing. I decide to cut a piece of sheet aluminum from my old Footbox front and epoxy that to the dash on the backside. Simple enough. For the Headlight Switch we use an oversized washer and a Dremel with a stone wheel to notch the inside of the washer before epoxying it into place behind the dash. I think it was a layout decision change that resulted in the incorrect hole size.



From the front ...



We let that dry, then filled in the front side with a little epoxy to bring those more flush. After sufficient drying time, we clean the surface with epoxy before Landau Cement is applied.


After triple-checking finished layout and clean surface, we use a 4Ē wide bush to apply Landau Cement to the back of the dash covering and the front of the dash surface. Drying time of 20 minutes is advised and I monitor it for tackiness and sheen. After about 20 minutes most of the two mating surfaces are dry, so itís time to apply. There was a little waviness in the dash cover material; Iím planning on using a roller to firmly roll the material both directions outward from the center. After very carefully lining the dash up with the mark on the back of the dash material, I gently rest the dash down onto the material. After some firm pressing down of the middle of the dash onto the material, I gently pick it up and turn it over. Using a tube of silicone, I start in the center and firmly roll the material outward toward the ends, including around the curved ends. Ok.... material applied, let it dry. Iíll roll the edges over after I cut out for the gauges and can pull those tabs in at the same time.



After overnight drying I mark the cutouts and start notching the dash material for rolling it over. My cutting tool is a simple box cutter, cutting from the backside, and I do have to break it a few tabs down every so often to keep the cutter sharp.



After cutting the holes out, notching them for foldover and notching the material around the edges, I apply more Landau Cement along the edge and bottom of the dash and all the way around the perimeter of the dash material, and let that dry. The stuff is smelly, use in a well ventilated area.



After drying about 30 minutes, I fold over the edge cutouts and press them into place with my ĎRollerí. Itís starting to look better.





After drying time (yeeesh...!) I start installation of the gauges and controls.











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08-12-2019 06:27 AM
IsaacW
2015 Donor Mk4 Roadster w/IRS, First Build - Input Welcome, Many Questions.

Back to The Dash for a bit. Final mock-up completed, we picked up some Landau Contact cement from the local Home Depot. In hindsight all we needed for the dash and seats would have been about 1 Cup, but we may end up using it for the carpet in which case we will probably use the majority of it. But back to the final dash mock-up.

Driverís main view. Call me weird, I want to see the speedo as my primary gauge with my left arm blocking the view of the left gauge. Force of habit for eyeball movement, and thatís the main information I want.



Middle of the dash. Gauges are in order of importance from left to right and top to bottom, roughly grouping temps and pressures close to each other. The clock will not be remaining, but will be replaced by an electronic fuel pressure gauge with a pressure sender at the fuel rail when I replace the stock fuel rail. I have the wires there waiting.



Received my Headlight Switch and ignition switch and got them temped in place. Heated seat switches ... check. Ordered a hazard light switch and high beam switch from Amazon; they are a couple toggle buttons with icons and indicator lights from what appears to be the same company under two different names. Etopar? Esupport? Ok...... anyway. That concludes my gauge and switch mock-up..... time to stop procrastinating and get the dash assembled.

To support the dash we cut 4 pieces of aluminum angle bracket and countersunk screws into the dash. Before I glue the covering on, I wanted to make sure the screws donít create any irregularities on the surface of the covering once itís done. We use some epoxy spread thinly across the screw heads and countersink divots. I let that dry overnight sitting face up to let it spread as evenly as possible.



After letting that dry, we sand the epoxy down a little to make it flush, and then we clean the surface off with acetone. More cleaning after bending and fingerprints.

So whatís next? The assembly directions donít do a great job of telling you what order to do what task in. After staring and thinking about it, I decide to first mark a sharpie reference mark on the back of the dash covering, then roll the ends of the dash and bend a 90 at the notches, paint on the Landau Cement, let it dry, and then stick the dash onto the covering and roll it together. Iím trying to avoid glueing the dash and covering it before bending it. We will see how this goes.

First I mark the covering on the white back for reference along the bottom lip of the dash. Then I grab a quart paint can and head to a long flat surface to try to roll these edges. Canít lie, Iím afraid Iíll screw up. This is what I have to curve inward.



They say you can use a paint can to roll the ends ....



Here goes. I grasp the end against the paint can and roll the two toward the center of the dash, firmly keeping the two held together.



So far so good.... itís rolling around the paint can.....



And I keep rolling until the end wraps almost completely around the can. The bend is nice and smooth.... now to bend the end 90-degrees. There are two circular notches that mark there the ends of the bend should be. My old reliable hand tongs make short work of the bend.







And there we have one end done .... repeat the process for the other end.... almost. The end of the metal at the Passenger end of the dash needs a little trimming, but just a little, and a rebend at a slightly different angle to avoid hitting the dash. In this picture the dash is putting a little pressure on the firewall.



A little snip-snip along the bottom, and my sharpie mark showing the estimated rebend angle ....



Continued....




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08-11-2019 10:46 PM
IsaacW
2015 Donor Mk4 Roadster w/IRS, First Build - Input Welcome, Many Questions.

Quote:
Originally Posted by edwardb View Post
Still not the same since the factory setup also includes a line to the top of the radiator with a one-way valve. That's part of how it keeps air out of the system. Mustangs (and our builds) have run millions of miles without blow-off caps when set up the way Ford designed. Controlling engine temp is a big deal. Altering a known working setup is risky IMO for no other reason than the aesthetics and perceived inconvenience (which it isn't) of the tank location. Good luck whatever you do.


Ahah... I must not have read enough to be aware of the one-way valve to the radiator .... Iíll re-visit that. I agree, I donít want to mess with the way Ford designed the ECU to control the engine temperature.


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08-11-2019 08:46 PM
edwardb
Quote:
Originally Posted by IsaacW View Post
Paul, I do plan on plumbing it like you did with a small line coming off the expansion port, not with a T-filler. It would end up acting as an expansion tank. I do want to use one that employs a blowoff cap, not just a cap, in case of emergency, and feeds from the bottom. A little more interesting to find.
Still not the same since the factory setup also includes a line to the top of the radiator with a one-way valve. That's part of how it keeps air out of the system. Mustangs (and our builds) have run millions of miles without blow-off caps when set up the way Ford designed. Controlling engine temp is a big deal. Altering a known working setup is risky IMO for no other reason than the aesthetics and perceived inconvenience (which it isn't) of the tank location. Good luck whatever you do.
08-11-2019 08:00 PM
IsaacW
Quote:
Originally Posted by edwardb View Post
Of course, do what you want. But kind of apples and oranges comparison. The Moroso 63806 tank you see many of us installing in Coyote builds is an expansion tank. Not a traditional gravity style overflow tank. It's installed in a similar location and plumbed exactly like a Mustang. The height it ends up at is fine because it operates via pressure. Site glass isn't an issue in my experience. Once filled, I've found it doesn't change. The tank eliminates the need for a T-filler in the top radiator hose, and makes burping air from the engine a non-issue because it does that by design. Bottom line it's a closed system that operates the Coyote exactly like Ford designed it.


Paul, I do plan on plumbing it like you did with a small line coming off the expansion port, not with a T-filler. It would end up acting as an expansion tank. I do want to use one that employs a blowoff cap, not just a cap, in case of emergency, and feeds from the bottom. A little more interesting to find.


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08-11-2019 06:38 PM
edwardb
Quote:
Originally Posted by IsaacW View Post
Second, Iím considering the location of my coolant overflow/fill tank and the style. The standard is the polished Aluminum Moroso Mustang replacement tank. No sight glass, and at the accepted location, itís below the engine, or at least appears to be. I am considering a tank similar to the Moroso 63776 tank, and mounting it back near the ECU. This will accomplish a few things. It will elevate it above the engine, it will balance the look of the stainless triple reservoir on the other side of the engine compartment, and it will make it more accessible instead of being tucked up under the hood. I would be able to dodge the coolant line inside the engine cover to hide it fairly quickly. Another small thing, it will make it look a little less crowded up at the front of the engine compartment. The rear corner of the engine compartment is looking a little lonely, with no wipers, Fuse block, etc. there is nothing over there. Just seems right to me.... maybe others have tried it and failed?
Of course, do what you want. But kind of apples and oranges comparison. The Moroso 63806 tank you see many of us installing in Coyote builds is an expansion tank. Not a traditional gravity style overflow tank. It's installed in a similar location and plumbed exactly like a Mustang. The height it ends up at is fine because it operates via pressure. Site glass isn't an issue in my experience. Once filled, I've found it doesn't change. The tank eliminates the need for a T-filler in the top radiator hose, and makes burping air from the engine a non-issue because it does that by design. Bottom line it's a closed system that operates the Coyote exactly like Ford designed it.
08-11-2019 06:09 PM
IsaacW So, several projects on the list right now, and I have made progress on most.
1) Dash covering, gauges and electrical
2) Engine Electrical finishing
3) Power Steering
4) Cooling system
5) Air Intake

Iím also considering a few items. The side pipes that I currently own are the base kit raw metal side pipes and not the finished look Iím going for. I will run them during go-cart phase, but the final finish will likely involve an upgrade to polished stainless.

Second, Iím considering the location of my coolant overflow/fill tank and the style. The standard is the polished Aluminum Moroso Mustang replacement tank. No sight glass, and at the accepted location, itís below the engine, or at least appears to be. I am considering a tank similar to the Moroso 63776 tank, and mounting it back near the ECU. This will accomplish a few things. It will elevate it above the engine, it will balance the look of the stainless triple reservoir on the other side of the engine compartment, and it will make it more accessible instead of being tucked up under the hood. I would be able to dodge the coolant line inside the engine cover to hide it fairly quickly. Another small thing, it will make it look a little less crowded up at the front of the engine compartment. The rear corner of the engine compartment is looking a little lonely, with no wipers, Fuse block, etc. there is nothing over there. Just seems right to me.... maybe others have tried it and failed?

Has anyone used FW1 Washing Wax? Iíve heard good things. And what cleaner is the best for the Leather dash? Even covered, itís tending to accumulate dust.




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08-04-2019 05:05 PM
IsaacW
2015 Donor Mk4 Roadster w/IRS, First Build - Input Welcome, Many Questions.

Now that the engine is in, we take the blankets off the frame rails and peeled most of the tape off the frame. I also returned the triple reservoir to its mounted position. I couldnít help but start to lay the wiring harnesses in their spots and start to make a few easy connections. One of those which has the potential to cause some sparking is the power wire to the starter. We go ahead and make up that connection.




Will post a pic of it made up ....

Another easy one to make up but also easy to forget is the ground strap. Pretty important to the engine operating properly.




Bolt, nut, and a washer for good measure, to make sure the strap doesnít slip out. Being a good electrician I make sure that the POR15 coating is ground off the frame on both side of the contact surface to ensure good continuity, especially for the main engine ground.



Iíve also been concerned with how much of the anti-seize compound could possibly get into the top of the O2 sensors while they slip around in the bag, however rational or not that may be, so I go ahead and spin those into place and tighten them up, just wrench tight, not too concerned about torque value on those.







Judging by the location of the shifter, I get the impression that Iíll be sticking with the rear position due to frame rail interference. I temporarily slipped the transmission tunnel cover on. I am thinking a spacer will be necessary for aligning the output shaft with the Differential adaptor plate, and Iím hoping it will solve what looks like an rubbing of the shifter handle on the tunnel cover.









I also pulled out the side pipes and temporarily mounted them finger tight to the headers ...... couldnít help it. That was one of the parts that made me break into a big grin when I was doing inventory.





Starting to shape up.......


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07-28-2019 05:14 AM
IsaacW
2015 Donor Mk4 Roadster w/IRS, First Build - Input Welcome, Many Questions.

Engine Install Day!! A big milestone, and Iím excited for it! Iíve double-checked all my engine prep, Sender installs, wiring harness prep, Transmission install..... I think itís time to stop stalling and get on with it!

Iíve had the engine on the lift for the past week with transmission install going on. I have arranged for a couple of buddies to come over and give me a hand maneuvering the engine into place. The Roller is positioned to accept the engine; I have the front wheels up on 4x10s and the back is on Jack Stands raised up almost 15Ē off the ground, so itís at quite an angle which should help install. Iíve got the fuel line and wiring harness legs lashed back, I took the additional step of swinging the brake fluid reservoir to the outside of the frame rail and we grabbed a couple of blankets for the upper frame rails. I also taped off the insides of the surfaces likely to be scratched or dinged by the engine or transmission.



Ready to fill the hole...



Before proceeding, we talked about the steps to installing the engine.

1. Position the lift and raise the engine
2. Move the engine rearward until transmission is almost touching firewall
3. Loop pull tape under front crossmember and over nose of tranny
4. Pull downward on transmission nose to achieve install angle
5. Ease engine rearward and downward in alternating steps
6. When engine is a few inches above mount, install headers
7. Lower engine to mounts

So letís get to it.



We get the powerplant into place .......
My daughter loves to pose.



We raised the engine until it clears the front radiator crossmember. Josh is making sure the engine doesnít hit the radiator crossmember.



Still posing ....

Groan.

Crank down the load leveler, and loop the pull tape over the nose to get more down angle on it.




We go ahead and gradually lower the engine and creep it rearward in an alternating pattern, adjusting on the fly. Shawn guiding the tranny.



Once we got the engine down into the compartment we needed a little help guiding the nose of the transmission; we used the floor jack to get the nose up and over the A-frame that we had previously installed. Once we got the the engine back far enough we drop the engine down almost into place.



Time to get the headers in place. First we squeeze a bead of gasket material around the header tube openings on the flange, and then we finger-tighten the header bolts snug. The gasket material directions instruct us to snug them up, then wait an hour before torquing them down. The header bolts do present a challenge in a couple of spots where the header tubes interfere with starting a bolt into the hole, but we only had to loosen the driverís side header up once to get the last bolt started into the hole.





While we are waiting on the gasket material to firm up, we go ahead and drop the engine down the rest of the way, while making sure the transmission stays in place.



And sheís in!! More detailed work and pictures in posts to follow. I canít tell you how excited I am to have the engine in and the headers installed! My friends headed out to continue their Sunday with their families, but their help was awesome and made short work of a big task. All told it took about 2 hours being careful and taking pictures.







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07-24-2019 07:43 PM
IsaacW
2015 Donor Mk4 Roadster w/IRS, First Build - Input Welcome, Many Questions.

So, tried to re-center the shifter cover, found out that is the only position it will sit in, it wonít shift right due to the location of the bolt holes in the transmission body. Oh well, no harm done.


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07-22-2019 10:34 AM
edwardb You removed the right part (the "donut") and the remaining seal looks fine. Just made me nervous with the previous picture and description. Sorry about any undue concern there. Hard to say about that shifter being off a little. It works with a ball and socket joint which you probably saw when you took it apart. And seems that would handle whatever misalignment might result. If it's not too much bother, I'd probably re-center it. Easy now. Not so easy later. But that's just me.
07-22-2019 04:44 AM
IsaacW Iím getting a little ahead, but I will get caught up. When I reinstalled the shifter cover, Something caught my eye. I may have inadvertently put the shifter cover too far over in relation to the steel below it. I noticed a lap over on the right-hand side of the cover and a lap under on the left. It is not difficult to remove the bolts and cover and reapply gasket material in order to make it perfectly straight .... would you take the time to do so?






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07-22-2019 04:34 AM
IsaacW Thanks, everyone, for the input. I appreciate it, need it, and am thankful for the coaching.

Just want you all to feel free to keep guiding me along the path.


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07-22-2019 04:33 AM
IsaacW
Quote:
Originally Posted by edwardb View Post
I've never had a new Tremec received with fluid. Could just be residual assembly lubrication. Easy enough to check. Remove the lower drain plug and see if any fluid comes out. You don't want fluid in the transmission before putting into the chassis. The down angle required for assembly will dump fluid out the back.



There is a rubber donut installed inside the output area for shipping. Depending on who you bought the transmission from, it may have been removed already. If the rubber piece in your picture is what you removed, that's a permanent seal for the slip yoke and is supposed to be there. Looks like it may be damaged now? If so, they're available and should be replaced.

I wasnít expecting this one to have fluid either..... this the surprise. Hehe.

Paul... when I removed the shifter cover per your recommend, I found a little fluid in there. I suspect there may be more in the body.

Regarding the rubber part that I removed, I think I removed the right piece and left the right one in there.

Hereís the one I removed.







And hereís a few pics of the on that remains on the tail end of the tranny. It appears to me to be the seal that would fit around the output shaft.







I think I have it right. Let me know if I goofed up.



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07-21-2019 07:59 PM
edwardb
Quote:
Originally Posted by IsaacW View Post
I suspected the Coyote Installation Kit would have the bracket, but not in my case for some reason. I even looked through the list of parts included in the kit and it didnít have it listed in the Coyote Installation Parts at all in my shipping manifest, not even as a back order.

Thanks for the tip on the shifter, Iíll do that before we get started. I also noted this morning as I looked at your pictures that you swung the triple reservoir aside that in order to get the engine head down past it, and Iíll loosen that up and do that as well.

I pulled the rubber donut off the output shaft and much to my surprise, some transmission fluid came flowing right out. I was under the impression that they were shipped dry..... I slipped the donut partially back into place to stop any more from coming out in the install process. Hopefully that does not cause an issue. Iíll have to make sure there is not enough in there to leak out the shifter.

I've never had a new Tremec received with fluid. Could just be residual assembly lubrication. Easy enough to check. Remove the lower drain plug and see if any fluid comes out. You don't want fluid in the transmission before putting into the chassis. The down angle required for assembly will dump fluid out the back.

There is a rubber donut installed inside the output area for shipping. Depending on who you bought the transmission from, it may have been removed already. If the rubber piece in your picture is what you removed, that's a permanent seal for the slip yoke and is supposed to be there. Looks like it may be damaged now? If so, they're available and should be replaced.
07-21-2019 05:46 PM
IsaacW
Quote:
Originally Posted by edwardb View Post
Looks like a version with cats installed.


Yep, catalytic converters are installed in the headers.


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07-21-2019 05:45 PM
IsaacW
2015 Donor Mk4 Roadster w/IRS, First Build - Input Welcome, Many Questions.

Quote:
Originally Posted by edwardb View Post
Looking good! You may want to remove the shifter (6 bolts) from the top of the tranny before dropping that in. It has sealant so can be a little stubborn to remove. But makes the installation much easier and not hard to replace once in. You may want to turn it around to the front location anyway. BTW, don't sweat about the header appearance. They are nearly invisible once everything is done. Regardless, those look nice. Also, that adapter plate is included in the Coyote installation kit, which apparently you didn't buy? Has nothing to do with base or complete kit.


I suspected the Coyote Installation Kit would have the bracket, but not in my case for some reason. I even looked through the list of parts included in the kit and it didnít have it listed in the Coyote Installation Parts at all in my shipping manifest, not even as a back order.

Thanks for the tip on the shifter, Iíll do that before we get started. I also noted this morning as I looked at your pictures that you swung the triple reservoir aside that in order to get the engine head down past it, and Iíll loosen that up and do that as well.

I pulled the rubber donut off the output shaft and much to my surprise, some transmission fluid came flowing right out. I was under the impression that they were shipped dry..... I slipped the donut partially back into place to stop any more from coming out in the install process. Hopefully that does not cause an issue. Iíll have to make sure there is not enough in there to leak out the shifter.




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07-21-2019 05:32 PM
IsaacW
Quote:
Originally Posted by JKleiner View Post
Those headers aren't polished. If they were you wouldn't see the heat from welding. Where did they come from? The big collector is unique but flow will hit a bit of an abrupt obstruction when it hits the 4 hole sidepipe flange.



Jeff


Got those from Factory 5, their Polished Stainless Headers. Maybe they were polished stainless before the welding .....


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07-21-2019 12:54 PM
JKleiner Those headers aren't polished. If they were you wouldn't see the heat from welding. Where did they come from? The big collector is unique but flow will hit a bit of an abrupt obstruction when it hits the 4 hole sidepipe flange.

Jeff
07-21-2019 11:14 AM
edwardb Looking good! You may want to remove the shifter (6 bolts) from the top of the tranny before dropping that in. It has sealant so can be a little stubborn to remove. But makes the installation much easier and not hard to replace once in. You may want to turn it around to the front location anyway. BTW, don't sweat about the header appearance. They are nearly invisible once everything is done. Regardless, those look nice. Also, that adapter plate is included in the Coyote installation kit, which apparently you didn't buy? Has nothing to do with base or complete kit.
07-21-2019 05:55 AM
IsaacW
2015 Donor Mk4 Roadster w/IRS, First Build - Input Welcome, Many Questions.

I believe the last step I need to finish before engine install is the rear transmission mount. I had ordered the Energy Suspension 4.1104G, so I proceeded with Mounting. Or so I thought. Number one, I didnít have the Mounting Bolts, the Mount itself only comes with the bolts and locknuts that install upwards into the bottom of the mount from under the A-frame transmission bracket. The necessary bolts are a 1/2-13 bolt and I chose 1-1/4Ē for length. These are the bolts that mate into the transmission. I say that because thereís more. An adaptor bracket installs first onto the tranny, and this offsets the Energy Suspension Mount rearward to mate onto the A-bracket. So I need a second set of bolts with washer and locknut to install the tranny mount onto the adaptor plate. I opt for 1/2-13 flange bolts, with a Nylon Locknut and flat washer.

The base kit does not come with the adaptor bracket, so I asked my friend with the milling machine make a bracket of 1/4Ē plate steel. Even better, he covered it with a coating called Steel-It which is gray in color and contains particles of stainless.

Hereís a picture of the hardware.



All the hardware in hand, I go ahead and install the bracket. Hereís the tranny before mounting. No instructions for torque on these, I tighten them to 80 foot-pounds.



I apply some Blue Loctite and install the bolts to mount the bracket to the transmission.





Next I insert the mount bolts and couple the two pieces of the mount together with the adaptor bracket. Again I tighten these to 80.








With that complete, I believe she is ready to go in! Time to prep the engine compartment.

Iíve read the steering column interferes with the installation, so I disengage the column from the PS rack and wrap it with a cloth before securing it off to the side. I zip-tie the fuel line and the wiring harness legs that will connect to the engine off to the side as well, to keep them out of the way. Next I apply some tape to the surfaces I think may be nicked or scraped as the engine or transmission make their way into the car.




I also taped the inside and top of the transmission tunnel to avoid any accidental dings in there.



After measuring the engine hoist and under-car clearance, I find the car does not have adequate clearance to allow the lift to slide under the car. So I raise the front wheels up onto a couple of pieces of 4x10 that I have laying around. I want the car sloping downward at the front, so I also raise the rear wheels up a ways and insert jack stands. Next time this car touches the ground there will be an engine inside, and she will have gained 500 pounds.





Yes, Eagles. Wentz. Enough Said.

I also have a few items staged under the car waiting for the engine to get close enough to position. I have the two exhaust headers placed behind each front tire so that when the time comes, the headers will be right there. I have the header bolts and locknuts staged as well as gasket material. I think this will make it easier to judge the best install position quickly and then perform the installation efficiently. The creeper is waiting under the car in case it is easier to work from below. I have a few guys scheduled to come over and give me a hand making sure this baby goes in nice and easy.

A quick mock-up of the header with the engine in free air. Good looking, but I guess I expected Ďpolished stainlessí to be a little shinier.



I am excited for install day, this has been a while in coming.




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07-19-2019 05:39 AM
IsaacW Removed the tranny and made sure the pivot ball was seated as far back as it would go. The clutch is basically perpendicular to the input shaft. Reinstalled the tranny and we are good to go. Made sure to torque the mounting bolts equally at 46 foot-pounds after applying blue Loctite. Checked the shifting action, the shifter arm cycles nicely through all gears.


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07-18-2019 11:59 PM
IsaacW
2015 Donor Mk4 Roadster w/IRS, First Build - Input Welcome, Many Questions.

Quote:
Originally Posted by edwardb View Post
Actually you can't. You need to get it adjusted properly now. Once everything is together, there isn't any way to reach in there and adjust it. Stop now and get it right, in case it's not. Basically you want the clutch arm perpendicular to the driveshaft line, or slight behind, with the throwout bearing against the clutch fingers. Adjust if necessary. The picture below is with the hydraulic setup, so ignore that. Just note the clutch arm position.

That dent in the cover shouldn't be a problem. The shift rails are under there, and some distance below the cover. Looks like this inside: http://enthusiastnetwork.s3.amazonaw...-gear-rods.jpg.



Copy that, will do, on the clutch fork. Not too difficult at this point.

Good to get confirmation on the cover. For a second I misunderstood, thinking you were saying it was going to be a problem.

Iíll work on the clutch fork tonight and get that adjusted. The pivot ball is slightly ahead of perpendicular. I might have an issue getting it behind, but I get the gist of what youíre saying and will get as close as possible.


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07-18-2019 08:55 PM
edwardb
Quote:
Originally Posted by IsaacW View Post
...Before final installation of the bellhousing I install the pivot stud and the clutch fork. I am not sure how far the pivot stud wants to be tightened in, but I’m going to guess that it’s most of the way toward bottoming out. If I need to readjust I can do so later...
Actually you can't. You need to get it adjusted properly now. Once everything is together, there isn't any way to reach in there and adjust it. Stop now and get it right, in case it's not. Basically you want the clutch arm perpendicular to the driveshaft line, or slight behind, with the throwout bearing against the clutch fingers. Adjust if necessary. The picture below is with the hydraulic setup, so ignore that. Just note the clutch arm position.

That dent in the cover shouldn't be a problem. The shift rails are under there, and some distance below the cover. Looks like this inside: http://enthusiastnetwork.s3.amazonaw...-gear-rods.jpg.

07-18-2019 08:16 PM
IsaacW
2015 Donor Mk4 Roadster w/IRS, First Build - Input Welcome, Many Questions.

Electrical details being one thing, mechanical assembly has its own appeal. Time to take a break from wiring to prep the drive train for installation.

Getting the correct Offset Dowel Pins turned out to be a big fiasco and took about a week. After ordering and receiving the Lakewood pins number 15950 we discovered that they have a 1/2Ē diameter and the Coyote dowel pinsí diameter is a larger 5/8Ē inch. After looking at different parts, we took a shot in the dark and ordered the Lakewood 15920, which have a 5/8Ē diameter but are supposed to be for a GM vehicle. They end up working just fine.

I decided to hold off on mounting the clutch on the flywheel so that I could re-measure the offset once I had the offset dowel pins in. Duh? Adjusting the dowel pins to correct the bellhousingís offset turned out to be an exercise in patience and frustration as well as a very touchy process, but I got it dialed in and marked the bellhousing and the dowel pins at the correct rotation.

After getting that dialed in, I installed the dust shield, slid the flywheel back on, and torqued the flywheel nuts to 80 lb-ft in a star pattern. The clutch disc installation tool supplied with the clutch holds the disc in center while sliding the pressure plate into place on the flywheel pins and tightening the clutch-to-flywheel bolts in to 36 lb-ft in a star pattern . Then the disc installation tool comes out before sliding the bellhousing on.





Before final installation of the bellhousing I install the pivot stud and the clutch fork. I am not sure how far the pivot stud wants to be tightened in, but Iím going to guess that itís most of the way toward bottoming out. If I need to readjust I can do so later.

The Clutch kit included most of the mounting hardware that is necessary, but the mounting bolts for the bellhousing itself were the wrong size. I took a trip to the hardware store and picked up some grade 8 cap screws with Locknuts to substitute. I tightened that to spec and now, itís ready for the transmission!





Before tranny install, though, I want to get the starter installed. It will be easier to install it without the tranny bumping into my left side and smearing gasket grease all over me. Three bolts anchor it into the bellhousing. However, the dust shield is the part that the starter seats into, and I find that the two set of holes donít quite line up. I end up having to loosen the bellhousing bolts enough to knock the dust shield over to where the holes line up. I tighten those back in, and the starter tightens in just fine. I figure the same 35 lb-ft should do just fine.





I donít have a Transmission Jack, but my new floor jack should be able to do the trick if I balance the Transmission right. The transmission is a heavy item, and if I have learned anything in my years in construction, itís that you have to be smart in how you manage heavy items. Often you donít have to work as hard as you think. I scoot the transmission box over to the end of the engine/bellhousing and open the box. Itís a tough box, and holds the tranny on it while I move the floor jack next to it. Then I shift the transmission over to the jack for raising it up.



It rests with a slight cant on the jack pad and we raise it toward its final destination. You can see we used a towel to cushion the edges on the jack pad.




Once we get it at about the right height, we roll it toward the bellhousing and get it moving into the hole. A little maneuvering for height, and we get the tranny almost all the way in. Judging by feel, the only thing keeping us from getting in all the way is the teeth of the input shaft not quite lining up with the teeth on the inside of the clutch disc. A big No-No would be trying to pull the tranny in with the bolt heads.... turning the tranny on the input shaft is the correct way. We turned it slightly and it slides right into place once the teeth mate up. We go ahead and tighten the mounting bolts in to the specified 45 (well, 46) lb-ft and our tranny mounting is complete!!



There seems to be a small indentation in the top of one of those covers, I donít think itís a big deal.... any opinions?



Big check mark on the list! Almost ready to go in ..... just a couple small things left.






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07-18-2019 07:08 PM
IsaacW
Quote:
Originally Posted by edwardb View Post
Those 12 gauge crimps look much better. Congrats on passing the smoke test. It's fun bringing it all to life.


I get such a big grin on my face when I get big steps finished up ......


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