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  Topic Review (Newest First)
09-01-2019 04:50 PM
edwardb
Quote:
Originally Posted by kenladdude View Post
Hi Ed,

Working on trunk panels and just had a question about the holes on this rear bottom flange.
What are they for?

Have looked through your thread and can't seem to find a shot of this panel later on showing what is mounted to it.

I am thinking it is for clamps for the wiring harness?
If so did you use similar mounts as the ones in the engine bay?

Thanks as always.
Ken
No, those holes don't have anything to do with the wiring harness. What they actually are I never mentioned in the build thread. Once I had that rear piece riveted in place, it was somewhat wavy along the back edge. I didn't like it so riveted another piece of .090 aluminum on the bottom to straighten it out. Almost for sure not necessary, but that's what I did.

The rear wiring harness, after exiting above the tank, is held to the 3/4-inch square frame along the back in a couple of places with these kinds of clamps, available in multiple sizes. https://www.mcmaster.com/3225t26. Same as used everywhere else for the wiring harness. A lot of guys use tie wraps for the wiring harness to the frame. I prefer these.
09-01-2019 04:16 PM
kenladdude Hi Ed,

Working on trunk panels and just had a question about the holes on this rear bottom flange.
What are they for?

Have looked through your thread and can't seem to find a shot of this panel later on showing what is mounted to it.

I am thinking it is for clamps for the wiring harness?
If so did you use similar mounts as the ones in the engine bay?

Thanks as always.
Ken
06-17-2019 07:19 PM
edwardb
Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigS View Post
Did you order just the glass. I am considering that but wonder if the rubber seal comes with it. Mine is 12 yrs old and once in a while driving into the sun the standard pitting shows really badly.
Yes, I ordered just the replacement glass. Their part number 15828. It does include new rubber seal material for around the glass in the frame, plus a new seal piece for along the bottom against the body.
06-17-2019 07:02 PM
edwardb
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Sharpe View Post
If the wire is too big, all is well, if the wire too small, the wire gets hotter than the seat. How hot does it get? Choose your wire well. If you want a good example, run 18 ga. from the battery to your starter. Push it outside before you try to start it.
OK... I don't think anyone is recommending or is going to try something as extreme as using 18 gauge wire from the battery to the starter. The context you took the quote out of was a question from another builder (six months ago BTW) asking whether a 20 amp circuit was enough for seat heaters, which draw about half that. Answer is yes.
06-17-2019 06:53 PM
CraigS Did you order just the glass. I am considering that but wonder if the rubber seal comes with it. Mine is 12 yrs old and once in a while driving into the sun the standard pitting shows really badly.
06-17-2019 03:13 PM
Tom Sharpe
Quote:
Originally Posted by edwardb View Post
As an aside comment, of course good design says you always account for the heaviest current the circuit will see, plus some margin over.
If the wire is too big, all is well, if the wire too small, the wire gets hotter than the seat. How hot does it get? Choose your wire well. If you want a good example, run 18 ga. from the battery to your starter. Push it outside before you try to start it.
06-17-2019 03:55 AM
noclot Consider what I did with the windshield. I fixed it with the standard two bolts on the driverís side , but only one on the passenger side. This reduces the torsional (twisting) stress. I am on the third summer, no crack yet. The windshield feels solid with three bolts. I don.t know if this is a good idea, but so far so good.
06-17-2019 02:43 AM
edwardb
5000 Mile Report

Now in its third driving season, #8674 20th Anniversary Roadster is just about to turn 5,000 miles. Maybe even next week at the London show. Thought I would give a report of the journey since graduation.

To recap, #8674 was ordered from a New York Thruway rest stop on the way to the 2015 Factory Five open house in Wareham. That was the day they were released for sale, and mine is number three of twenty. We were back in Wareham in August 2015 to pick it up. It was completed just in time for the 2017 Detroit Autorama, was legal a couple months later, and back in Wareham again for the 2017 Open House. Couple weeks later made its first trip to London and did some charity rides with only a few hundred miles on the odometer. Since then, we’ve driven it as much as our Michigan weather allows. Another London show. Detroit Autorama again only this time in the Ford Performance display. Made it to the Texas Spring Cruise earlier this year and back to London for the third time next week. In between, countless shows, cruise-ins, our local Woodward Dream Cruise, and multiple events and cruises with our local Great Lakes Cobra Club. I enjoy meeting people and sharing the car and experience, giving rides, plus won some awards along the way. A couple weeks ago we had a private event at the Ford proving grounds in Romeo, Michigan. Something that not many get to do. Was in a group of 30+ similar cars doing triple digits around their 5-mile banked high speed oval track. Now that was a gas. Just solid fun and great times with the car and great friends. It draws attention wherever it goes, even when parked with much more expensive and exotic cars, of which there are plenty around here in SE Michigan.

Along the way, the car has been almost perfect. The Gen 2 Coyote crate motor is simply awesome, and thanks once again to those who talked me into it. Mostly Ron Everitt at the 2015 London show. The Coyote ran the stock Ford Performance tune for the first 1,000 miles or so. Then after hearing numerous positive reports, worked with Lund Racing for a custom tune. Made a great running engine even better. I had one ride of shame home on a flat bed, which in hindsight was mostly my fault. I didn’t re-tighten the hose clamps on the intake after the initial installation. On the way to a Saturday morning cars and coffee, the intake separated between the MAF sensor and the throttle body. Just won’t run that way, and I managed to not notice it until it was back home in my garage. Couple lessons learned there. Everything about the car for me is perfect. The Coyote of course, the hydraulic clutch, the Liberty Transmission TKO600, the KRC power steering, the big Wilwood brakes, the new (at the time) 2015+ Mustang based IRS. It’s easy to drive, and as I tell everyone, is as mild or wild as you want. It’s 99.9% a street driver, and I admit I’m a conservative driver. Partly out of being realistic about my driving skills, respect for the car, plus there’s a county sheriff substation just around the corner from where I live. I almost never go out driving without multiple LEO sightings. So I keep it legal and I’m fine with that. There is literally never a time that I climb in and drive down the street without a smile on my face and feeling blessed to own such a fun machine. Many of the miles are with my bride in the passenger seat. She’s a great sport about it and enjoys riding and the social aspect of our friends and club members. But she won’t drive it. Both of my sons have had some driving time. They’re both out of state, so doesn’t happen often. But rich times when it does. The three of us are the only ones that have driven it, and will probably stay that way.

Couple late breaking updates. While researching and installing the Gen 3 Coyote in my Gen 3 Coupe build, I found multiple references and recommendations for using a honeycomb airflow straightener in the cold air intake before the MAF sensor. Supposed to improve MAF readings improving idle, throttle response, etc. I ended up installing one in my Coupe build. Since it’s not on the road yet, no verdict on the results. But decided to try one on this build to see if any difference. I bought a 3.5-inch straightener, part number ACCH35, from Treadstone Performance. HoneyComb MAF Mass Air Meter Airflow Straightener. Was an easy installation in the air filter side of the Spectre MAF filter adapter. I made a cardboard template of the intake diameter, stuck to the honeycomb straightener with double back tape, and carefully sanded to the correct diameter on my stationery disk sander. Didn’t need much and with new 80 grit paper, cut easily. I put a very light coat of JB Weld plastic bonder around the inside of the intake and pushed into place. The tube is slightly tapered, so wedged in nicely. Looks like this.




I’ve only driven the car 20 miles or so since the installation. Don’t know if it’s my imagination but does seem to run even better. Idle seems nice. In the past, every once in a while, I feel just the slightest hesitation under acceleration. It’s really minor, and I’ve logged and had Lund look at it. They don’t see anything and say everything looks perfect. Like I said, really minor and barely perceptable. I didn’t notice it at all during my initial drive after installing the straightener. Will be interesting to keep monitoring.

Last thing. Between parking it in the garage last Monday afternoon, and climbing in for a drive Tuesday night, I found I’d joined the broken windshield club. Ugh.


Feel like I installed the windshield properly. Shimmed for no stress. Don’t ever hang on it. Nothing. But three years later while sitting in a cool garage it broke. I guess this story has been repeated a lot. My first thought was to go with the Fast Freddie Lexan windshield. Michigan is one and done for inspection, so no issues there. His website says temporarily out of stock. Contacted him and was told (1) no ETA for more, (2) probably not going to offer it anymore. Also see his asking price is up to $600. So looked for other options. Many suggest getting a Lexan sheet and cutting your own. Found multiple recommendations for the Optic Armor brand. Probably the same thing as available through plastics suppliers. But available in the right rough size, plus through Summit Racing so only a $9.99 shipping premium. But wouldn’t be here for a couple weeks and really want this fixed for London next week. So decided to call Factory Five. Have a replacement glass on the way and should have fixed in the next couple days. If it breaks again, the next one will be Lexan.

That's it. Back to driving and hope the next 5,000 is as fun as the first. Hope to see many of you in London next week.
02-13-2019 10:21 PM
edwardb
Quote:
Originally Posted by egchewy View Post
could you please expand a bit on the couplers for the rear quick jack bolts?
do these replace the metal spacers provided on the rear bolts?
No. The gas tank limits access to the back of the rear quick jack bolts. Once the tank is installed, you will find it difficult if not impossible to reach them, meaning potentially dropping the gas tank to install or remove the quick jacks. The idea is to bolt the couplers to the frame before the gas tank is installed. Then use pieces of threaded rod into the couplers to mount the quick jacks. All from the outside without having to access the back side covered by the tank. Still use the spacers, etc. That's the short explanation. There are longer explanations and pictures if needed. Search for "Kleiner mod."
02-13-2019 09:58 PM
egchewy could you please expand a bit on the couplers for the rear quick jack bolts?
do these replace the metal spacers provided on the rear bolts?
01-19-2018 05:13 PM
shark92651 Perfect, thanks!
01-19-2018 02:21 PM
edwardb
Quote:
Originally Posted by shark92651 View Post
Paul can you talk a bit more about how you assembled your dash and trans tunnel cover so that no fasteners are visible or printing through to the leather? I understand you sandwiched two pieces of aluminum together, but did you attach your brackets to the inner piece of aluminum using countersunk holes and flat head bolts and then use an adhesive to bind the two pieces of aluminum together, or did you do something else? I plan to use Alex's glovebox (assuming I can get in touch with him and have him use my leather) and his instructions state to sand down the foam over the screw heads to level it, which I guess wouldn't be a bad approach, especially if the holes are countersunk.

Thanks,
David
For both the dash and the trans tunnel cover I fabricated brackets that mount on the back side and are used to attach to the frame. In all cases, they are held in place with flat head bolts counter sunk into the aluminum before any foam or covering. I get the screws counter sunk into the aluminum so they're completely flush. Then use JB Weld as a filler and sand it out just like doing body work or whatever, making sure the area is dead flat. Whatever foam and covering is used, they won't print through. I personally don't sand the foam. I prefer making sure the underlying surface is flat. I used Alex's kit on #7750 and did the same thing to mount his glovebox. Worked fine.

For the dash, I have used a doubler on two builds because I like how it makes the dash feel a little more solid. (FWIW, not required and strictly a personal choice. It does add quite a bit of work.) I use Weldwood gel contact cement to glue the two aluminum pieces together. There are probably other better adhesive choices, but when completed, the sandwich is also held together by the instruments, glove box screws, some of the switches, steering column trim ring, etc.
01-19-2018 01:49 PM
shark92651 Paul can you talk a bit more about how you assembled your dash and trans tunnel cover so that no fasteners are visible or printing through to the leather? I understand you sandwiched two pieces of aluminum together, but did you attach your brackets to the inner piece of aluminum using countersunk holes and flat head bolts and then use an adhesive to bind the two pieces of aluminum together, or did you do something else? I plan to use Alex's glovebox (assuming I can get in touch with him and have him use my leather) and his instructions state to sand down the foam over the screw heads to level it, which I guess wouldn't be a bad approach, especially if the holes are countersunk.

Thanks,
David
01-14-2018 05:06 PM
edwardb
Quote:
Originally Posted by cobraAZ View Post
-Thank you for the quick reply, it seems you just saved me from having to do a lot of extra work!
-My interpretation from your recommendation is that when selecting wire gauge, I should focus on voltage drop and not worry about fusing current.
-Below I summarize my voltage drop calculations and would appreciate knowing if I am off in left field:
-----------------------
18G AL resistance/length=75mOhms/ft (note: AL is 1.65x CU)
distance from passenger seat to fuse panel=7ft
load current=6A
voltage drop on power=(75e-3)*7*6=0.45V
voltage drop on power plus ground =2*0.45V=0.9V
18G-->16G drops this by 37%-->0.57V
16G-->14G drops this by 37%-->0.36V
-----------------------
-Thus, 18G results in 12-0.9V=11.1V across seatwarmers
-while 14G results in 12-0.36V=11.64V across seatwarmers
I don't know that anything I said meant to not be concerned with current vs. voltage drop. Both are important. In my experience (and selection) I do actually focus on current. Typically the right sized wire for our use based on current will not have enough voltage drop to make a big difference. Mainly because the distances are all relatively short. Even from the front to the back of the car. (You EE's, be easy on me right now...) Also, if you want to be a little more technically correct, you may want to do the calculations with a bit higher voltage. Even though a 12 volt system, with the engine running and alternator in the circuit, the voltage is going to be in the 13 - 14 range. Depends on your setup and alternator. Easy enough to measure. I don't recall the seat heaters coming with AL wire either. As I recall it was copper. But it's been a couple years since I've installed them last or maybe they've changed.

But it's all a bit academic IMO. The summary from me is (1) There's no point in adding wire that is larger than what is already in the harness from the mfg, (2) As mentioned before, I haven't had any issues with the wire size provided. As an aside comment, of course good design says you always account for the heaviest current the circuit will see, plus some margin over. But in actual use, you'll probably find you usually don't have the heaters on the high setting. They run quite hot, and at least for me personally, I don't like it on that setting. Almost always only on the low setting. Even my wife in the passenger seat typically doesn't use the high setting very often. That should tell you something.
01-14-2018 04:16 PM
cobraAZ -Thank you for the quick reply, it seems you just saved me from having to do a lot of extra work!
-My interpretation from your recommendation is that when selecting wire gauge, I should focus on voltage drop and not worry about fusing current.
-Below I summarize my voltage drop calculations and would appreciate knowing if I am off in left field:
-----------------------
18G AL resistance/length=75mOhms/ft (note: AL is 1.65x CU)
distance from passenger seat to fuse panel=7ft
load current=6A
voltage drop on power=(75e-3)*7*6=0.45V
voltage drop on power plus ground =2*0.45V=0.9V
18G-->16G drops this by 37%-->0.57V
16G-->14G drops this by 37%-->0.36V
-----------------------
-Thus, 18G results in 12-0.9V=11.1V across seatwarmers
-while 14G results in 12-0.36V=11.64V across seatwarmers
01-13-2018 11:28 PM
edwardb I've installed those exact heaters, using the supplied wiring and switches, on three Roadster builds. Including extending the switches to the dash. Between the three, multiple driving seasons with no issues whatsoever. As Rich said, that 18 gauge wire will handle the current pretty easily for the short distances involved.
01-13-2018 09:45 PM
rich grsc An 18ga wire can easily handle such low amps. It can handle up to 20 amps if the run is short, like 5 ft or less. Remember its 12v, not 110.
01-13-2018 09:06 PM
cobraAZ 1) Regarding your heated seat install, I am installing the same "warmseats" package and noticed that the battery connection uses 18g AL wire. With max current of 6A, it seems like this shoul be 14g. I plan to install my switches in the dash like you did so when routing to the dash I am wondering if I should use to 14g wire.
2) When at the high setting, the back and bottom seat heaters are in parallel causing the full load current of 6A to run through the switch. At low setting the heaters are in series and only draw 1.5A through the switch. 6A seems high for that little switch. Thus I am also considering putting a relay in series with the yellow wire which drives both seat heaters when they are in parallel at the high setting.
-thoughts?
09-22-2017 12:44 PM
edwardb
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dougb View Post
Paul, (or web guru), How do I get to your build thread where adventures in bracketry, guidance thru the electrical maze, and information on vendors and part numbers abound? I've been gone; now, I'm back. Things have changed. Where are your fellow builders with harrowing tales of building adventures? I'm needy and dependent. Where are the supporting vendors listed? You get the idea... I do thank you for the exceptional build and sharing your journey.
The links to my build threads are in my sig line below. Those links will start you at page 1. The link for supporting vendors is in the menu bar. Advertising on FFCars.com

Welcome back!
09-22-2017 01:16 AM
Dougb
Lost in web land...

Paul, (or web guru), How do I get to your build thread where adventures in bracketry, guidance thru the electrical maze, and information on vendors and part numbers abound? I've been gone; now, I'm back. Things have changed. Where are your fellow builders with harrowing tales of building adventures? I'm needy and dependent. Where are the supporting vendors listed? You get the idea... I do thank you for the exceptional build and sharing your journey.
07-30-2017 12:33 PM
alexg
Quote:
Originally Posted by edwardb View Post
I used the Moroso 20570 pan and Moroso 24570 pickup. Both bolted up perfectly with no fitment issues to the engine. The only issue was with the oil dipstick. There was an initial fix by Moroso but mine still had a problem. It's been a couple years. Maybe that's been corrected too. But definitely something to check and an easy fix. Talked about it in post #241 here: https://www.ffcars.com/forums/5352298-post241.html.
Once again, Thank you Paul for your priceless advise!
Alex..

Sent from my MHA-L29 using Tapatalk
07-30-2017 12:29 PM
edwardb
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexg View Post
Hi Paul. Just tried fitting my Canton oil pan. Must say really poor quality, holes don't really line up nor does the pan sit flat without interfering with the windage tray.

I think I'll cut my losses and go for a Moroso!

How did yours fit, any issues? Any chance you know the part number of your pan?

Alex..
I used the Moroso 20570 pan and Moroso 24570 pickup. Both bolted up perfectly with no fitment issues to the engine. The only issue was with the oil dipstick. There was an initial fix by Moroso but mine still had a problem. It's been a couple years. Maybe that's been corrected too. But definitely something to check and an easy fix. Talked about it in post #241 here: https://www.ffcars.com/forums/5352298-post241.html.
07-30-2017 09:47 AM
alexg
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexg View Post
Cheers Paul,
I thought as much and I've capped it off as you suggested.
I found this book quite helpful, it does suggest that the controls pack ignores the low level sensor. https://www.amazon.com/Ford-Coyote-E.../dp/1613252897
Alex..

Sent from my MHA-L29 using Tapatalk
Hi Paul,
Just tried fitting my Canton oil pan. Must say really poor quality, holes dont really line up nor does the pan sit flat without interfering with the windage tray.

I think I'll cut my losses and go for a Moroso!

How did yours fit, any issues? Any chance you know the part number of your pan?

Alex..

Sent from my MHA-L29 using Tapatalk
07-03-2017 10:48 PM
alexg
Quote:
Originally Posted by edwardb View Post
Hey Alex. I didn't buy anything extra. The low oil sensor and harness was part of my 2015 Coyote crate package. It went right into the Moroso pan port. There is some question whether this sensor is even active using the crate motor controls pack. I heard from several that it was not on the Gen 1 Coyote, but nothing definitive for my Gen 2. But it was just as easy to put the sensor in the pan as finding a plug for it, so I just went for it. If your newer Coyote crate doesn't have the sensor or accompanying harness, I would plug the port in the pan and be done with it. Sounds like Ford is doing something different now. You could call Ford Performance tech support and confirm there isn't a sensor or support for it in your PCM if you really wanted to.
Cheers Paul,
I thought as much and I've capped it off as you suggested.
I found this book quite helpful, it does suggest that the controls pack ignores the low level sensor. https://www.amazon.com/Ford-Coyote-E.../dp/1613252897
Alex..

Sent from my MHA-L29 using Tapatalk
07-03-2017 02:03 PM
edwardb
Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigS View Post
FYI I got my IRS retro fit on the road last December. I autocross a lot but no track time. I have nothing but the rubber 90 degree piece on my diff. Nothing comes out of it at all.
The question was about the low oil sensor on the Coyote engine oil pan. The Mustang center section vent tube just happened to be in the same post quoted. Agreed, I haven't seen anything come out of it as well.
07-03-2017 12:55 PM
CraigS FYI I got my IRS retro fit on the road last December. I autocross a lot but no track time. I have nothing but the rubber 90 degree piece on my diff. Nothing comes out of it at all.
07-03-2017 12:20 PM
edwardb
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexg View Post
Hi Paul,

I noticed you are using a oil low level switch on the Morso pan. Was this purchased separately?
My stock 2016 Coyote oil pan did not have a sensor port at all. I'm using a Canton pan, which has a spare port, but no sensor.

I've scoured the internet and cannot seem to find reference to this sensor. Do you know the part number?

Regards,
Alex
Hey Alex. I didn't buy anything extra. The low oil sensor and harness was part of my 2015 Coyote crate package. It went right into the Moroso pan port. There is some question whether this sensor is even active using the crate motor controls pack. I heard from several that it was not on the Gen 1 Coyote, but nothing definitive for my Gen 2. But it was just as easy to put the sensor in the pan as finding a plug for it, so I just went for it. If your newer Coyote crate doesn't have the sensor or accompanying harness, I would plug the port in the pan and be done with it. Sounds like Ford is doing something different now. You could call Ford Performance tech support and confirm there isn't a sensor or support for it in your PCM if you really wanted to.
07-03-2017 07:34 AM
alexg
Quote:
Originally Posted by edwardb View Post
Iíve now received my Coyote engine, so lots to share there. But first a bit of unfinished business on the IRS. I know there are many options, but I chose to fill with the exact Ford recommended gear lube and friction modifier. Didnít see the Motorcraft products on the shelf at any of my local parts stores, so stopped at the local Ford dealer. He said they donít normally stock the 75W-85 weight. I mentioned that was specified by Ford for the 2015 Mustang IRS, and he responded they havenít replaced the gear lube in too many of those yet. OK I guessÖ Anyway, he ordered what I needed. At the same time, I ordered the Mustang vent tube for the center section. How to handle the vent isnít mentioned anywhere in the FF instructions. The Mustang piece is maybe a little too long, but has the right size right angle connecter to plug onto the center section, and then a plastic vent at the other end, similar to the metal vent used on the 8.8 solid axle Iím familiar with. Once the stuff arrived, I put the first quart of gear lube in, then the 3+ ounces of friction modifier, and then topped off ending up using about 3.3 pints as specified. Once again I was reminded how much that friction modifier stinks! (My wife noticed very quickly as well.) Took about a day for the garage to air out.

These are the products recommended by Ford. Easy enough to find in Mustang specs. Also listed at the end of the FF IRS instructions.


This is the Ford part number for the Mustang vent tube assembly. Itís only $10-12.


Just mocking up how it might be used, this is plugged onto the center section and routed over to the PS.


Iím thinking of tie-wrapping it to the fuel tank vent tube that will come up in this same area in the wheel well. Thatís where the Mustang routes it. Would be easy to shorten.


OK, now to the Coyote adventure. Some months ago when I planned and budgeted this build, using FFís Coyote instructions, other build threads, etc. I planned all the parts necessary, including of course the engine itself. I had several sources in mind to buy it from, mainly shopping price to be honest. When I was ready to click the button to purchase last week, the first place I went said ďFord Coyote M-6007-M50 no longer available, replaced with M-6007-M50A.Ē Went to a number of sites and found the same message, although some with the M-6007-M50 still available in limited quantities. Turned out what I was seeing, and I guess I must be living under a rock, is that Ford made some pretty significant changes starting in 2015, and M-6007-M50A is the 2015-2016 Coyote motor. I immediately noted it has more HP and torque, so no complaints there. Then I found they have released a brand new control pack M-6017-504V for the 2015-2016 engine, which is mandatory. The 2011-2014 engine wonít work with the new control pack and the 2015-2016 wonít work the old control pack.

So, after all said and done, I found a great price for the 2015-2016 engine, control pack, engine covers, alternator and starter package, including free lift gate home delivery, and placed my order last Thursday. After a little back and forth discussion, received notice that it shipped on Friday. Monday it was at the freight company, and Tuesday morning it was in my garage. Now thatís service! Turns out (and I didnít know any of this) Coyotes are made in Fordís Essex engine plant, which is right across the river from me in Windsor, Canada. Goes from there to the Ford Racing distribution center in Livonia, MI, also pretty close to me. So it never had very far to go. BTW, the place I bought the engine is not a forum vendor, but I recommend them. They were very interested in my project, patiently made sure I had exactly what I needed, and asked me to send a picture when itís done. Cool! PM me if you want more details.

Just a few words about the 2015-2016 Coyote engine. I am far from a Coyote expert. Iím learning as I go here. Itís rated at 430 HP and just over 400 torque. In the Roadster with the revised intake and straight tube headers, should get a good bump from those numbers. I think it will be enough. Some of the changes to the 2015-2016 engine are bigger heads and valves. Apparently similar to the Boss heads but in cast form. A revised crankshaft, connecting rods, pistons, and a couple internal changes to the block. A major addition is charge motion control valves (CMCV) added to the intake manifold. This was something used before on 3V mod motors, as I understand, and one of the first performance modifications was to remove them. Ford claims these were done right on the Coyote, and get totally out of the way when open. They are supposed to provide better low-end torque without affecting high rpm power. I understand this also allowed some changes in how the variable cam timing works. All interesting stuff (I guess) but I think itís cool my anniversary edition with the latest 2015 Mustang IRS now will also have the latest Mustang powerplant. The flip side is what might be the implications of the change as I go down a path not travelled yet for these builds (that I know of). Iíll detail what Iíve found out so far. Mostly OK (I thinkÖ).

The engine arrived crated and boxed as many have seen. First time for me seeing a Coyote outside of an engine compartment. Interesting. And HUGE.



Right off the bat, noticed they added an oil cooler to the oil filter location. After checking with some other builders, confirmed thereís no way this will fit. Good news is that it was easily removed. Itís just sitting on top of the normal oil filter location with an extended adapter hold it in place. Side note: Itís a $300+ dollar part! Iím taking a run at eBay to see if the Mustang crowd will take it off my hands.


Next order of business was to get it out of the crate and up onto the engine stand. But before I did I quickly checked the fitment of my just received Quicktime bell housing. Oops! Ordered the wrong one. Good grief. Ordered RM-6060 instead of RM-6080. I amaze myself sometimes, and not in a good way. Exchange underway. I used the side motor mount bolt locations with chains and lots of towels and rags over the engine to hook it up and onto the engine stand. Had to get some metric bolts for the back of the block long enough for the stand, so yet another visit to my friends at Ace. But it mounted up OK. Just barely fit around the flywheel. It comes filled with oil, so drained that out. I didnít have any clean containers, so never really thought to save the oil. I should have! I didnít know it was 8 quarts and that it was synthetic. Put some bucks into the old oil recycle there. Oh well. Yet another lesson learned. I installed the alternator using the supplied Ford Racing kit. Very easy except the one idler wheel they provide but don't show in the instructions. Guessed it needed to replace the one already on the engine, and turns out that was right. Then turned it over and took the stock pan and pickup off and replaced with the Moroso pieces.



I would have loved to lift off that factory gasket/windage tray and peak into the innards there a little. But it was stuck in place with sealant, and I chose not to disturb it. I could see the 4-bolt mains, with the front one pretty visible. Actually I guess 6-bolt if you include the ones through the side of the block. All five are just like this. Pretty stout engine there.


After checking the pickup to pan distance using the clay method (actually plumberís puttyÖ) and finding it just over 3/8 inch (good) I installed the Moroso pan. Also added the engine mounts, just finger tight.




Hi Paul,

I noticed you are using a oil low level switch on the Morso pan. Was this purchased separately?
My stock 2016 Coyote oil pan did not have a sensor port at all. I'm using a Canton pan, which has a spare port, but no sensor.

I've scoured the internet and cannot seem to find reference to this sensor. Do you know the part number?

Regards,
Alex.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
05-28-2017 12:38 PM
edwardb
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexg View Post
Hi Ed,

Just wondering if you needed to dismantle, pack and reassemble your engine mounts as noted in the Coyote install instructions?

I'm currently at this stage, however there were no spacers given with the kit.

Just an added note, im building a right hand drive version here in Australia, which has some added variations to the LHD instal. This is outlined in the RHD Coyote install instructions.
These instructions call for a spacer fitted between the mount and the Coyote on the right hand side only. I have this spacer only.

Any assistance would be greatly appreciated.

Alex
I can't give direct advice regarding RHD, for obvious reasons. But can share what I did with the engine mount spacers. This was discussed a lot during the build with several other Coyote past and current builders. FF initially said only to use a spacer on the left side (LHD drive) and most including me thought this was to tip the engine away from the very close driver's footbox. For my build I found a spacer on each side was fine, and the engine was closer to level giving better header to body alignment. I initially used Whitby spacers between the engine mounts and frame mounts. During my build, FF released spacers that went inside the engine mounts. I'm sure the ones you mention. I thought that was a better solution so ordered them from FF. The pictures below show what they look like out of the package and when installed.

You will need to determine whether one spacer or two gives you the best engine alignment inside the footboxes, the proper oil pan clearance at or above the 4-inch chassis tubes, and the best side pipe alignment. All are affected by the spacer(s). I personally prefer the newer internal spacers, but the external ones work as well. Hope that helps and good luck.


05-28-2017 05:33 AM
alexg
Quote:
Originally Posted by edwardb View Post
Iíve now received my Coyote engine, so lots to share there. But first a bit of unfinished business on the IRS. I know there are many options, but I chose to fill with the exact Ford recommended gear lube and friction modifier. Didnít see the Motorcraft products on the shelf at any of my local parts stores, so stopped at the local Ford dealer. He said they donít normally stock the 75W-85 weight. I mentioned that was specified by Ford for the 2015 Mustang IRS, and he responded they havenít replaced the gear lube in too many of those yet. OK I guessÖ Anyway, he ordered what I needed. At the same time, I ordered the Mustang vent tube for the center section. How to handle the vent isnít mentioned anywhere in the FF instructions. The Mustang piece is maybe a little too long, but has the right size right angle connecter to plug onto the center section, and then a plastic vent at the other end, similar to the metal vent used on the 8.8 solid axle Iím familiar with. Once the stuff arrived, I put the first quart of gear lube in, then the 3+ ounces of friction modifier, and then topped off ending up using about 3.3 pints as specified. Once again I was reminded how much that friction modifier stinks! (My wife noticed very quickly as well.) Took about a day for the garage to air out.

These are the products recommended by Ford. Easy enough to find in Mustang specs. Also listed at the end of the FF IRS instructions.


This is the Ford part number for the Mustang vent tube assembly. Itís only $10-12.


Just mocking up how it might be used, this is plugged onto the center section and routed over to the PS.


Iím thinking of tie-wrapping it to the fuel tank vent tube that will come up in this same area in the wheel well. Thatís where the Mustang routes it. Would be easy to shorten.


OK, now to the Coyote adventure. Some months ago when I planned and budgeted this build, using FFís Coyote instructions, other build threads, etc. I planned all the parts necessary, including of course the engine itself. I had several sources in mind to buy it from, mainly shopping price to be honest. When I was ready to click the button to purchase last week, the first place I went said ďFord Coyote M-6007-M50 no longer available, replaced with M-6007-M50A.Ē Went to a number of sites and found the same message, although some with the M-6007-M50 still available in limited quantities. Turned out what I was seeing, and I guess I must be living under a rock, is that Ford made some pretty significant changes starting in 2015, and M-6007-M50A is the 2015-2016 Coyote motor. I immediately noted it has more HP and torque, so no complaints there. Then I found they have released a brand new control pack M-6017-504V for the 2015-2016 engine, which is mandatory. The 2011-2014 engine wonít work with the new control pack and the 2015-2016 wonít work the old control pack.

So, after all said and done, I found a great price for the 2015-2016 engine, control pack, engine covers, alternator and starter package, including free lift gate home delivery, and placed my order last Thursday. After a little back and forth discussion, received notice that it shipped on Friday. Monday it was at the freight company, and Tuesday morning it was in my garage. Now thatís service! Turns out (and I didnít know any of this) Coyotes are made in Fordís Essex engine plant, which is right across the river from me in Windsor, Canada. Goes from there to the Ford Racing distribution center in Livonia, MI, also pretty close to me. So it never had very far to go. BTW, the place I bought the engine is not a forum vendor, but I recommend them. They were very interested in my project, patiently made sure I had exactly what I needed, and asked me to send a picture when itís done. Cool! PM me if you want more details.

Just a few words about the 2015-2016 Coyote engine. I am far from a Coyote expert. Iím learning as I go here. Itís rated at 430 HP and just over 400 torque. In the Roadster with the revised intake and straight tube headers, should get a good bump from those numbers. I think it will be enough. Some of the changes to the 2015-2016 engine are bigger heads and valves. Apparently similar to the Boss heads but in cast form. A revised crankshaft, connecting rods, pistons, and a couple internal changes to the block. A major addition is charge motion control valves (CMCV) added to the intake manifold. This was something used before on 3V mod motors, as I understand, and one of the first performance modifications was to remove them. Ford claims these were done right on the Coyote, and get totally out of the way when open. They are supposed to provide better low-end torque without affecting high rpm power. I understand this also allowed some changes in how the variable cam timing works. All interesting stuff (I guess) but I think itís cool my anniversary edition with the latest 2015 Mustang IRS now will also have the latest Mustang powerplant. The flip side is what might be the implications of the change as I go down a path not travelled yet for these builds (that I know of). Iíll detail what Iíve found out so far. Mostly OK (I thinkÖ).

The engine arrived crated and boxed as many have seen. First time for me seeing a Coyote outside of an engine compartment. Interesting. And HUGE.



Right off the bat, noticed they added an oil cooler to the oil filter location. After checking with some other builders, confirmed thereís no way this will fit. Good news is that it was easily removed. Itís just sitting on top of the normal oil filter location with an extended adapter hold it in place. Side note: Itís a $300+ dollar part! Iím taking a run at eBay to see if the Mustang crowd will take it off my hands.


Next order of business was to get it out of the crate and up onto the engine stand. But before I did I quickly checked the fitment of my just received Quicktime bell housing. Oops! Ordered the wrong one. Good grief. Ordered RM-6060 instead of RM-6080. I amaze myself sometimes, and not in a good way. Exchange underway. I used the side motor mount bolt locations with chains and lots of towels and rags over the engine to hook it up and onto the engine stand. Had to get some metric bolts for the back of the block long enough for the stand, so yet another visit to my friends at Ace. But it mounted up OK. Just barely fit around the flywheel. It comes filled with oil, so drained that out. I didnít have any clean containers, so never really thought to save the oil. I should have! I didnít know it was 8 quarts and that it was synthetic. Put some bucks into the old oil recycle there. Oh well. Yet another lesson learned. I installed the alternator using the supplied Ford Racing kit. Very easy except the one idler wheel they provide but don't show in the instructions. Guessed it needed to replace the one already on the engine, and turns out that was right. Then turned it over and took the stock pan and pickup off and replaced with the Moroso pieces.



I would have loved to lift off that factory gasket/windage tray and peak into the innards there a little. But it was stuck in place with sealant, and I chose not to disturb it. I could see the 4-bolt mains, with the front one pretty visible. Actually I guess 6-bolt if you include the ones through the side of the block. All five are just like this. Pretty stout engine there.


After checking the pickup to pan distance using the clay method (actually plumberís puttyÖ) and finding it just over 3/8 inch (good) I installed the Moroso pan. Also added the engine mounts, just finger tight.


Hi Ed,

Just wondering if you needed to dismantle, pack and reassemble your engine mounts as noted in the Coyote install instructions?

I'm currently at this stage, however there were no spacers given with the kit.

Just an added note, im building a right hand drive version here in Australia, which has some added variations to the LHD instal. This is outlined in the RHD Coyote install instructions.
These instructions call for a spacer fitted between the mount and the Coyote on the right hand side only. I have this spacer only.

Any assistance would be greatly appreciated.

Alex
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