Sammio Cordite - Triumph Spitfire 1500 based kit - Page 6 - FFCars.com : Factory Five Racing Discussion Forum
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post #151 of 774 (permalink) Old 04-10-2014, 05:58 PM
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With molex plugs it's usually also an indication that you put the pins in the socket side and the sockets in the plug side :-)

They are (in my experience) built asymmetric so neither pins, nor sockets protrude.



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post #152 of 774 (permalink) Old 04-11-2014, 10:06 AM Thread Starter
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MPTech & Rockpool - Thanks for your feedback gentlemen.

This leads me nicely to the words of Homer Simpson...

D'oh!

There were no instructions with these connecting blocks & I've never used them before.

But now it is pointed out to me, I've clearly got the sides mixed up.

In addition to the "male" ends poking out in this photo that MPTech highlighted.



The "female" end is not much better.



So out came my penknife where the tweezers, sewing needle & short blade helped me to fix things.



With everything switched over on the parts I had previously fitted it all became clear.

This is now the male end, with nothing sticking out.
( Sorry most of these new close up photos have turned out blurred. )





And the female ends now sit flush too.



Luck, rather than judgement,means that the other connectors I have used are OK.

So thanks again for the replies, as clearly they were a big help to my build.

Take care, Paul.

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post #153 of 774 (permalink) Old 04-11-2014, 02:49 PM
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No problem Paul. I don't claim to be an expert and there are probably much more knowledgeable builders than I, but I can share my experience. Another trick for removing the pins (as you've probably gathered is very difficult) is a Pin Removal tool or pick up some VERY tight brass or aluminum tubing at a hobby shop that fits VERY tight or too tight over the pin and open it just barely enough with a small round jewelers file. If you slip / force a little, the tubing over the pin, it will close the "ears" enough to pull it back out.

Wiring these quick disconnects in for the headlights, directionals, tail-lights, dash gauges, switches and any other electronic devices that may be removed and re-installed if a HUGE time saver later! VERY good idea! You'll be glad you took the extra time to do it now.

Hope this helped!


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post #154 of 774 (permalink) Old 04-15-2014, 01:39 PM Thread Starter
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MPTech - All tips and advice are most welcome thanks.
Adding these connecting blocks & keeping the Spitfire's removable dash should definitely help in the long run.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Floors - Part 1:
There was a bit of repetition at this stage as I had two floors, each with two sides, to deal with.

I've already covered the first stages of the passenger floor and the next step was some etch primer.



By now I had also marked up all the other adjustments I needed to make to the driver's floor and started on that too.

Before:



After:



Once a side had been given the anti-rust treatment & primed I applied some fibreglass filler along the welds / edges.





Note: It is easy to spot where I ran out of etch primer whilst trying to finish off one side of one floor.

My plan is to hold the floors in place with pop rivets until I can finally bond / fibre glass them to the bodywork.

So I did a quick test with an off cut section of the floor and a short length of box section (as used in the framework).





This all looked good until I discovered that my rivet gun would not fit between the floor and the outside frame work.
( It would need to fit on the other side of this section of frame. )



So the floors will be temporarily held in place on just 2 sides (front and back), which will be fine.
( I don't want to use rivets on the inside edge of the frame, as that is made from a length of angle iron that sits directly on the chassis. )

I brought the floors back to the "car" on my front drive, so I could work out where I needed to put the holes for the rivets.

But while checking the general fit it slowly dawned on me that I had missed a chassis mounting point completely.

Don't ask me know this happened, I think I counted the 2 seat belt mounts as part of the 4 bolts through the chassis.

So this was something else I needed to mark the floors for.



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post #155 of 774 (permalink) Old 04-15-2014, 01:42 PM Thread Starter
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Floors - Part 2:
So after the final round of drilling, grinding & sanding, the floors now looked like this.

Top side:





Underneath:





They are still a bit rough & ready, but that is in keeping with the rest of the build.

By now, some more etch primer had arrived, so I could spray that on while the sun was out.





The next stage for the floors will be to get some black paint on them.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

More Wiring:
I finished off adding the remaining connecting blocks to the rear lights & wrapped up the ends of the wires too.



I have deliberately left the wires from the rear lights as long as possible to give me more flexibility with the main loom.

There is still more work to do on the wiring loom, but I need to test fit it to the car first to finalise the layout.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Two years and counting...
- 13th April 2012 - I visited the kit car company and put my deposit down for Cordite kit #7.
- 20th April 2012 - I bought my Spitfire 1500 donor car.

I gave up thinking about, or setting, deadlines to finish this project a long time ago.
However, passing anniversaries dates like these do make me stop and think a little bit.

My main focus at this point is still "just" getting the project to a working Go Kart stage.

The good news is that both the weather and daylight should keep improving from now on.
I am also much better at welding and fabricating now, so that should come in handy too.

So let's see where another 12 months of chipping away will take me.
And if there is still work to be done in a year's time, then so be it.

Until next time, take care, Paul.
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post #156 of 774 (permalink) Old 04-25-2014, 11:10 PM Thread Starter
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Floors:
I got the first coat of black paint on both sides of the floors.





It is nice to see these floors getting closer to the stage when they can actually be fitted.

Although the black makes it almost impossible to see anything clearly in the photos.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Hood Hinge Bracket:
I noticed that the hinge brackets bonded into the hood by the original kit car company had started to rust over the winter.



At least it was an easy job to sand the metal down and get some anti-rust treatment over the whole "bonded" area.





I then gave the excess bonding paste a bit of a tidy up with my angle grinder before spraying some etch primer on.



You will notice that the gap for the grille to fit inside the hood opening is not the same all the way around.

In fact it is pretty narrow along parts of the bottom, so I will need to cut the metal grill very carefully to match.

I also noticed that the holes in the hinge mounting points are actually different sizes.





At least when the time comes, that will be a very easy job to fix (and I haven't had many of those!).
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post #157 of 774 (permalink) Old 04-25-2014, 11:11 PM Thread Starter
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Bulkhead Fitting - Part 1:
I wanted to check all the bulkhead mounting points lined up correctly with the chassis.

Starting with the good news...

The two bolts for the back of the bulkhead on the passenger side went in with just a little persuasion.
( I'll clean the old paint off before final fitting. )



Both of the bolts on the inside of the front of the bulkhead went in OK too.



One of the mounting on the front of the bulkhead on the passenger side needed to be enlarged slightly.



Then that mounting bolt went in effortlessly.



The equivalent bolt on the driver's side went in without any adjustments.

This just left the bad news, which was always going to be these rear bulkhead holes on the driver's side.



This whole area was a rusty mess when I started my repair work & I knew it needed two crush tubes to be welded in.

Now I'm sure there are easy ways of doing this, but as I don't know what they are, this is how I tackled the problem...

I started by making a template for the "floating" retaining nuts.



I also reminded myself that the bolts go in perpendicular to the angle of the chassis arm.



I marked and cut out what I needed to set up the missing crush tube arrangement.



I used the cardboard template to ensure the correct spacing between the tubes.



Eventually it ended up looking like this.







In the last photo you can see the bottom painted and the tops of the tubes & the bottom plate taken back to bare metal for welding.

Note: I know the welding will melt the paint a bit, but it will provide some protection until the whole section is wax oiled.
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post #158 of 774 (permalink) Old 04-25-2014, 11:12 PM Thread Starter
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Bulkhead Fitting - Part 2:
Before the final painting & cleaning, I had double checked that the tubes aligned with the holes in the bulkhead itself.



Not very clear in the photo, but you can see through the retaining nuts in the chassis to the ground below.



Then I opened up the holes in the bottom & top edges of the bulkhead to accommodate the tubes.

I could get a good fit at the bottom edge, which will make it easier to weld the plate in place.



Also the crush tubes came through the bulkhead with no problems.



Unfortunately the top edge is a bit of a mess, that will require even more work to fix.



Still, I cleaned up the top & bottom edges of the bulkhead in preparation for welding.

At which point it was clear that would be very difficult to cut the tubes after they were welded in.

So I marked them up.



I also cut a couple of slots to allow me to push the metal out of the way.



With the tubes trimmed, it looked now like this which was good enough for me to get started.



So I clamped the bracket in place.



And welded it in.



I will tidy up the welding some more another day, as by now there were spits of rain.
( Have I even mentioned what a dumb idea it was to build a car outside? )

There was just time to one section of one tube from the top before the rain stopped play.

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post #159 of 774 (permalink) Old 04-25-2014, 11:13 PM Thread Starter
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Bulkhead Fitting - Part 3:
After a few failed attempts at cutting out some metal to fill in the gaps, I decided to make the bits I needed in stages.

This started by drilling two holes in some metal like so.



Then most of the smaller piece was then cut away to leave me just this.



Which filled in the gap around the tube nicely.



The second one required more cutting and shaping until it looked like this.



And even then, it was only going to fit if I welded it & hammered it some more as I went along.

Eventually I had sealed the tubes in from the top side like so.



This was a very awkward area to work in, but at least the mounting bolts fit.



Admittedly, not as neatly as I was hoping for, but at this stage I'm not complaining.

To be honest, even getting to this standard of finish was a bit of a challenge for my limited skills.

Then it was back to the usual routine of anti-rust treatment, etch primer & fibreglass filler on both sides...













The next steps on this will be to sand the filler down & get it painted.
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post #160 of 774 (permalink) Old 04-25-2014, 11:14 PM Thread Starter
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Rear Framework Mounting:
My latest Ebay purchase turned up...



Not a set of pan pipes, but some heavy duty tubing "off cuts" that I will use as crush tubes when bolting the frame to the chassis.



I started to drill the four mounting holes required in the chassis with the rear framework still in place.



Then, with the frame removed, I was able to widen the holes so that they would take the fixing bolts.



Unfortunately, I seem to have worn out my step drill bit as it just wouldn't cut into the chassis.

So I'll need to buy a new metal cutting drill bit to match the crush tube.



- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Rear Framework Mods:
This front edge of the frame on the driver's side needed a "trim".

Before:



After:



Not much, but enough to improve the clearance to the chassis.



The cut out for the passenger side seat belt mount needed a bit of work too.







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post #161 of 774 (permalink) Old 04-25-2014, 11:15 PM Thread Starter
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Rear Framework Painting:
I wanted to paint the new box section I'd welded to rear framework to stop it rusting.

After sanding it down, I could get some etch primer on in stages, so I could get paint on all four sides of the box.







I also did the mounting holes & cut outs on the underside of the frame.



- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Other Bulkhead Work:
I cleaned up & treated the edges on both sides of the bulkhead where the temporary cross brace had been.



I was in a bit of a rush trying to get the etch primer on as the rain was starting (again).





I also treated and filled the "inside" face of the three surplus bulkhead cable/wiring holes I'd previously welded on the engine bay side.



I smothered a small bit of metal with filler to cover the extra hole I drilled in error for the battery cut off switch cable .



- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Summary:
There still seems to be an endless list of little, time consuming, jobs to be completed at the moment.

But I really can see the light at the end of the tunnel in terms of the key pieces that will help me towards the go-kart stage.

So until next time, take care, Paul.
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post #162 of 774 (permalink) Old 04-26-2014, 01:57 AM
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Looks like a lot of work, but you are making progress!

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post #163 of 774 (permalink) Old 05-09-2014, 11:19 AM Thread Starter
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Dallas - Cheers.
The amount of work I've had to do on what was supposed to be a very simple kit is quite depressing at times.
But the good news is that I am slowly getting closer to finishing off some of the big "jigsaw" pieces.
I'll be very happy when the bulkhead, frame, floors & rear wheel arches are bolted on for the final time.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Weather Watch:
Lately it seems like very time I step out of the house to do some work on the car the sky turns black.



So I have been doing what ever I can manage in the gaps between the rain.

Odd Jobs:
I finished off the crush tubes I welded into the bulkhead, then primed & painted them.

My brush work blends everything in with the general rough finish of the bulkhead.





- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

I welded some "caps" to the box section framework I had taken my angle grinder to months ago.





The body shell was fouling the "super structures" I'd added for my rear seat belt mounting plates on both sides.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

I cut out a cardboard template for the grille to see how the shape of the bonded in hinge support would impact it.



I then marked up the opening from the front side of the bonnet.
( Note: I still have a bit of tidying up to do around the edges of the opening. )



As you can see, the gaps are bigger at the top, compared to the bottom, but it should be fine (touch wood).



- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

I also finished painting the rear framework.



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post #164 of 774 (permalink) Old 05-09-2014, 11:20 AM Thread Starter
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Chassis Crush Tubes:
I had bought a heavy duty 19mm drill bit which was marginally smaller than the crush tubes.



After expanding the 4 holes I'd already drilled in the chassis, I switched to a hand file to finish the holes off.



This gave me as close to a friction fit as my manual tools (& skills) would allow & all 4 tubes were in.



I used a "L" shaped ruler to keep the tube perpendicular to the chassis when I was welding the tubes in place.





Then I cut the tubes off with my angle grinder before filing down / cleaning up the top surface.



With this section of the chassis cleaned up and some etch primer on the tops of the tubes it was ready for paint.

Before:



After:



I am always amazed at what a difference a small lick of paint makes.

Later on I drilled holes in the bottom of the chassis thru the crush tubes so the frame fixing bolts could work.



I've also cut out and cleaned up 4 big square "washers" that will sit under the chassis to spread the load when the frame is bolted on.



Note:
I still need to make template for the holes required in these washers.
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post #165 of 774 (permalink) Old 05-09-2014, 11:21 AM Thread Starter
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Fuel & Brake Hard Lines:
The rear frame work fouled the existing fuel & brake lines the first time I test fitted it.

So these lines have been hanging off the chassis ever since.



As a rough guide, the frame work is about the same depth as the ruler in this photo.



And you can just about make out the original hole for the fuel line clip on the bottom right hand corner of the ruler.

I will be supporting the fuel & brake lines using two types of clips.



The one of the left fixes the fuel line to the chassis & the one on the right joins the brake line to the fuel line.

There is also a bracket fixed to the end of the chassis which would also need lowering.



I couldn't really get my drill into the small space available near the existing fixing hole in the chassis.
( Well, not without doing some major dismantling of other parts in that area. )

So I simply drilled a "higher" hole in the bracket which will do the same job of lowering the hard lines.



After a bit of drilling, all the fuel line clips are in and out of the way of the frame.



I also some extra dual line clips to give a better spacing between the chassis clips.



The hard lines were then left hanging loose until the chassis was painted (see previous post above).



But when that was sorted out, I could re-fix the chassis bracket that supports the fuel and brake hard lines.



Which in turn allowed me to fix the hard lines back to the chassis.





Overall, this turned into quite a time consuming job, but at least it is all done now.
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post #166 of 774 (permalink) Old 05-09-2014, 11:22 AM Thread Starter
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Modifying Covering Panel:
This access panel fits on the rear wheel arches over the rear suspension mounting bolts.



Unfortunately, since I fitted the lowering block, complete with longer studs, it no longer fits.



So I cut the "cover" section out, recycled a strip of metal and bent it around as best I could.
( I didn't have anything long enough, so I knew I would need a final "patch". )



Then I welded the top of the cover to the new "side" section.



Then welded that to the bottom section.



Then I was just left with a small patch to fill in the hole.



When that was welded in the cover looked like this.



In my defence, it was very windy outside which didn't help my welding at all.

Then it was the usual round of etch primer and fibreglass filler.



Which was eventually smoothed out "a bit", both inside & out.





Before coat of etch primer and the first coat of black paint.



As always, it still looks a bit rough & ready in places, but it should be water tight and that is all that matters to me.
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post #167 of 774 (permalink) Old 05-09-2014, 11:24 AM Thread Starter
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Muffler Support Bracket - Part 1:
On my original donor car, the bolts for the brand new twin tail pipes went through the floor here.



I still have a similar section of floor as part of my rear wheel arches arrangement.

However, it currently has no strength as it is not supported by the other sides of the trunk area.

After few attempts at working out the best way of doing this, I decided to KISS.

So I re-fitted the twin tail pipes & marked up where the mounting bolts would go.





I then drilled matching holes in both the floor and a length of angle iron that would form part of the support bracket.



My plan for the exhaust support makes use of this recess in the rear wheel arch.



I just needed a cardboard template so I could make a "washer" to fit from some thicker sheet metal I had.



The cardboard template also gave me the position of the hole required through the wheel arch.

I then test fitted one of the "feet" I recycled from the original Cordite bulkhead framework.



Then I trimmed some box section to make a nice join with the angle iron.
( Note: I'm just using the small cut off section to give the general idea in the photo. )



In order to keep the box section "square" to the angle iron I also needed to trim the end that joined the "foot".



With all the parts cut to the right length and shaped to fit I cleaned them up ready for welding.



I cut out, cleaned up & drilled holes in the "washers" to fit the recess in the wheel arch.
( Plus enlarged the hole in one of the recycled "feet". )



End of Part 1...

Last edited by Paul L; 02-15-2018 at 06:48 AM. Reason: Replacing PhotoBucket Images
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post #168 of 774 (permalink) Old 05-09-2014, 11:25 AM Thread Starter
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Muffler Support Bracket - Part 2:
This is how the "washer" sits on the inside of the wheel arch (I will be painting it).



I tightened the bolt through the arch to the point where I could just about move the "foot".



I used my trusty set square to make use the box section was at the right angle.



Then I tack weld all the component pieces into place.



Before removing the bracket completely to finish off the bulk of the welding.



Later on I drilled three extra holes in the angle iron so that I can bolt the floor to the bracket without the tail pipes in place.



Finally, I needed to cap the end of the box section around the "feet" on both sides.





With those final odd jobs complete, the painting could start.



The fact there was no where to bolt the mufflers to was one of the many problems with the original framework.

So working out a solution has been on my "To Do" list for a very long time and I'm glad I can tick that off the list.

Note: This is another thing that has been fixed in the revised and re-launched version of the kit I'm building.
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post #169 of 774 (permalink) Old 05-09-2014, 11:26 AM Thread Starter
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Floors:
I test fitted the floors so I could mark up the frame and drill some holes for the pop rivets.



The first thing I noticed was that one of the holes I'd drilled on the driver's side floor was not going to work.

As the position of the cross frame rail leaves a gap from floor to frame.



With the floor removed it is easy to see the slight drop in the "factory" set up.



Whereas the new passenger side section that I welded in actually sits flush.
( Surely luck, rather than judgement, as I just thought it looked better. )



So I simply drilled a new hole in the floor a bit further inward.
( The small gap will be filled by the bonding paste, so I'm not going to worry about it. )



With all the other holes required marked up I could start drilling the frame.



I stuck the rivets in just to make sure that the holes in the floor & frame lined up.



I will be bonding the floor to the frame, so the rivets are just going to help hold everything in place when the time comes.



After tidying up the holes, I gave the floors a final lick of paint.



These floors are now ready to be joined to the rear frame work.
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post #170 of 774 (permalink) Old 05-09-2014, 11:27 AM Thread Starter
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Bulkhead Fitting:
I cleaned the old blue paint of some of the bulkhead mounting bolts and dug out some new washers.

Before:



After:



Next I added some rolled up tape to the rubber washers used to mount the Spitfire body shell.



That way I could "stick" them to the chassis while I tried to but the bulkhead back on.
( All my previous attempts at doing this myself have ended with these washer all over the place. )





Thankfully I managed to get the bulkhead into position without scraping the new chassis paint.

Then I bolted the bulkhead into place, although some bolts were more of a pain than others.



It quickly became clear that I would also need to use these original spacers on two of the fixings.



They were needed on the "outside" of the bulkhead mounting point.





I didn't fully torque the bolts down as the bulkhead will be coming off again for a final coat of protective stone chip / sealer.

But I do need the bulkhead to be solidly mounted so I can build the "join" between it and the rear frame work.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Whilst part of me always hopes to get more work completed, I am still happy with progress.
The next stages of the build will hopefully see the final joining up of the main structural pieces.
That will be a key milestone on the way to reaching the "Go Kart" stage.

So until next time, take care, Paul.
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post #171 of 774 (permalink) Old 05-09-2014, 02:41 PM
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Good update and progress. Love your project.

FFR #7124 Mk 3.1, Levy 5 link, LCA's & brakes, 17" Halibrands, electric PS, SAI, Eibach springs, BOSS 427w, webers, hood louvers, tilt front. Delivered 12/23/09, 1st start 02/19/12. 1st go cart 03/03/12. Titled 10/3/12.

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post #172 of 774 (permalink) Old 05-13-2014, 03:41 PM Thread Starter
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Dallas - Thanks for the continued support and encouragement.
There was a time when I really thought I was never going to finish this build.
But now I know I will get there eventually if I can keep chipping away at it.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Muffler Support Bracket:
I marked up the trunk floor for the three bolt holes required.



After drilling them and applying a quick lick of paint the floor was ready.



Then I simply bolted the support bracket into place.



With the five bolts (2 x rear wheel arch + 3 x floor) tightened up, the whole thing does feel very solid.

So it should support the two bolts for the twin tail pipes with no issues.

Rear Wheel Arches:
Not a great photo, but I could get a thin pen through the chassis crush tubes to mark some tape I'd put under the hand brake panel.



Then I lifted the rear arches up just enough to drill pilot holes from below.

Before putting them back into position, so I could judge the final hole sizes from above.

I pushed the frame fixing bolts through just to confirm everything lined up.





You can see the rain has started in these last photos which meant I had to stop.

I had been racing to get the last holes drilled before packing everything away as I could tell rain was coming.

Although thinking about it, using a mains powered drill plugged into an extension lead in the rain was not a good idea.

By the time I've got the body shell back on on and then the covers on top of that I was completely drenched.

The next time I was out, I removed the rear wheel arches completely.



I will be moving this section to the back garden where it will be easier to finish off the last small bits of work required.

Plus I needed to do some more work on the rear framework before I can join the arches to that.
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post #173 of 774 (permalink) Old 05-13-2014, 03:43 PM Thread Starter
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Rear Framework & Bulkhead "Join" - Part 1
With the rear wheel arches out of the way, I could put the rear framework back into position.



I then used the fixing bolts to hold the frame in position.



These bolts will be cut to size after all the "sandwich" layers are in place.
( Frame, floors, hand brake panel from rear arches & over size chassis washers underneath. )

As I'd already bolted the bulkhead into place, I could now start working out how the "join" would work.

I started by quickly bolting the two recycled "plates" I had into position.
( I've still got to cut out two more of these plates for the other side. )



I started with the lower door hinge mounting point, as this should be the easier of the two to sort out.

Basically, I am just going to weld some box section to the middle of the plate like so.



But I needed to trim the box section to take account of the various odd angles involved.
( Bare in mind this is not how the kit was designed, but my own Frankenstein creation. )

So I marked up the box section.



Then cut out the inside edges.



This gives a nice fit like so.



You can also see the differences in width between the top and bottom edges of the box section here.



So far, I've only had a chance to start the work on this bracket by welding the box section to the fixing plate.





Then adding a "cap" to the end of the box section.



I'm really pleased with how solid this bracket is.

My current plan is to weld this to the framework and then bolt it to the bulkhead.

That way, the frame is fixed in position on one side while I measure the other three brackets required.

Until next time, take care, Paul.
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post #174 of 774 (permalink) Old 05-22-2014, 05:26 PM Thread Starter
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Passenger Floor:
I decide to put one of the lowered floor pans in place before I welded up the first "join" bracket between the rear frame & the bulkhead.

But, as usual, this turned into one of those ideas that took a lot longer than originally expected.

Obviously the floor couldn't be rested in place as I'd bolted the frame to the chassis.



Also the bolts are too long (until I finally trim them), so it takes ages to unbolt them, but eventually the frame was removed.



By now, I had remembered that my original plan was to weld the floor in place and this would be easier to do with the frame off the chassis.

I clamped the floor to the frame, after pushing in the the pop rivets to ensure it was all lined up properly.



Then I could mark up the floor edges ready for some trimming to allow the welding to take place.

Before:



After:



Then I cleaned up the edges of the floor ready for welding.



I also cleaned up the corresponding sections of the framework.

Then I used the six pop rivets to hold the floor in place & then added some clamps.



I had to move the frame around so I could get at the various edges.



Eventually I had partially welded all four edges (I will finish off the welding another day) and re-fitted the frame to the chassis.



Then I dug out one of my seats to see how that was looking.



To be honest, the angle of the seat back combined with the angle of the lowered floors is still a problem.

So I might just have to bite the bullet and buy a different set of seats.

Still, these is plenty to be getting on with before I really have to worry about the seats...
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post #175 of 774 (permalink) Old 05-22-2014, 05:27 PM Thread Starter
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Rear Framework & Bulkhead "Join" - Part 2:
I wanted to make sure that the rear framework was roughly level before I fixed the position of the "join" bracket.

You will see later on that the whole frame has "differences" built in, so working by eye is as good a method as any.
( As I am now convinced that no measuring devices were harmed in the construction of this frame. )

So I propped up both sides of the frame with whatever I had lying around.





The slope of my driveway means I need more spacers on the driver's side, as that is how the suspension has settled.

This is the view from behind and the frame is horizontal (ish) as the bulkhead is a bit "bumpy" in places.



After cleaning up the frame & bolting the mounting plate into position, I could clamp the bracket in place and weld it.





So far, so good.

But when I took the same length of box section to the other side I came up short?



Because obviously the two sides of the frame work are completely different lengths!!

This is the driver's side:



Note the gap from the front cross member of the frame to the leading vertical edge is approx. the width of the box section.

And this is the passenger side:



Where the same gap is approx. twice the size of the box section.

No doubt there was an equal and opposite difference on the original bulkhead framework to match.

Rather than dwell on the problems with the original kit, I just used a longer length of box section to make the bracket.

Which looked like this before I welded on a "cap" to seal up the box section.



With all the various "props" removed, the framework remained rock solid.



This was a small landmark in the build as it proved my Frankenstein build theory will work.

Note:
I am the only person I know building the old kit in this way, and the new version of the kit doesn't have any of these problems.
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post #176 of 774 (permalink) Old 05-22-2014, 05:28 PM Thread Starter
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Rear Framework & Bulkhead "Join" - Part 3:
You may remember that I had cut out a large section of the original bulkhead framework used to mount the pedals.
( Top of photo. )



So I cut this up some more to provide me with two mounting two plates.
( I left one a bit longer to cope with the different gaps on both sides. )



Now I just needed to mark up and drill holes to match the Spitfire door hinge mounts.



With the passenger side plate bolted into place, I used some cardboard to get the angles needed for a simple join.



Then I cut the box section to match and put in the usual "cut out" to take account of the different angles.



After cleaning the metal it was time to clamp it in place and start welding.





The driver's side was simply more of the same to end up with a join that looked like this.



The bulkhead & framework join is now absolutely rock solid and acting like a single structure which is just want I need.

I then unbolted the framework and, with my wife's help, lifted it clear so I could start on the driver's floor.

But before I went any further I got some etch primer on the "join" brackets.



Later on, after catching & tearing a rain cover on one sharp edge, I took my angle grinder to the corners to "soften" them a bit.

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post #177 of 774 (permalink) Old 05-22-2014, 05:29 PM Thread Starter
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Driver's Floor:
As before I needed to trim and clean up the edges of the floor and the corresponding edges of the framework.



Then I used the pop rivets to locate the floor so I could start clamping and welding.

I also "squashed" the floor a bit where the frame's cross member didn't sit flush.



After the first round of welding the floor looked like this.



Which left the rear framework looking like this.



Unfortunately, there is now no hope of me lifting this back onto the chassis by myself anymore.
( Partly because I used to stand inside the floor framework to balance the weight. )

But the good news is that I am very slowly inching towards the point where it will be permanently bolted to the chassis.

I did come back and complete another round of welding the lowered floor pans to the framework.



Even though there are still a few small gaps between the welds, it is more than strong enough.

So I will now cover all the edges with some fibreglass filler to seal the joins.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Rear Wheel Arches - Part 1:
Once again my wife helped me to carry the rear arches thru the house & into the back garden.
( As this is just an easier place to finish the last bits of work required. )



Before I started any work on the arches I double checked the fit of my modified panel cover.



It is a pretty good fit as it is, but it will only take a few tweaks to get a perfect seal.

I welded on a small patch to a section of the rear wheel arches that had been trimmed a while back.

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post #178 of 774 (permalink) Old 05-22-2014, 05:30 PM Thread Starter
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Rear Wheel Arches - Part 2:
I trimmed a a bit off the hand brake panel where thin strips of an adjoining panel remained.
( This should allow the panel to sit better on top of the floors / framework. )

Not that easy to see in the 'before' & 'after' photos.





But this was the double panel thickness of the "shavings".



I also gave the top of the wheel arches a light trim too just to ensure maximum clearance to the body shell.

Before:



After:



Note:
I'm really pleased how "factory" the washer for the muffler support bracket looks tucked into the wheel arch.



Then I did some general "tidying up" with the grinder including around the new chassis bolt holes before applying some anti rust treatment.



When that was dry I could put some more black paint on.

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post #179 of 774 (permalink) Old 05-22-2014, 05:31 PM Thread Starter
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Rear Wheel Arches - Part 3:
This was my first attempt at working with fibre glass to see if I could use it for some "simple" repairs.

There were "gaps" on both sides where the back of the wheel arch met the floor.





Plus one rush hole and a couple of factory holes I also wanted to seal.





I cut out some mesh to place over the holes.





Then I cut out some fibre glass matting to go over the top of the mesh.



Given how messy this whole process was, that was the last photo I took until the work was finished.

Steps:
- Key the painted surfaces using a wire brush on the end of my drill.
- Mix up some resin and catalyst
- Apply resin
- Add mesh
- Then add matting and more resin
- Use roller to remove any air



It did take me a while to get the hang of what I was suppose to do.

Half of the first batch of resin had set in the mixing container before I could apply it.

The simple edges around the factory holes were easier to do than the curves around the rust holes.

I guess I will just have to see how/if it all sets before I will be able to tell if I have got it right.

However, the whole point of doing the repairs this way was to get some practice using fibre glass.

Also I should mention the NCIS "look" that I was sporting while doing this work.
- Cheap white decorator's all in one "jump suit"
- Decent breathing mask
- Disposal rubber gloves

If this test has worked I will apply some more fibreglass to the underside of the arches next.

Whilst my progress is still slow, I really feel that I am finally getting somewhere at last.

So until next time, take care, Paul.
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post #180 of 774 (permalink) Old 06-09-2014, 06:41 PM Thread Starter
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Fibreglass Experiments:
I now have the skills to repair the rear arches using metal, but, as I said before, this was an excuse to work with fibre glass.

In addition, most of this work will never be seen as it will be either under the car, or hidden from regular view.

I used mesh in some areas to build up various edges that were missing / damaged.





I even repaired a missing section of the trunk floor in the same way.



I also tried my hand at fibre glassing over a "former".

As there were two sections of the arches seems to have been designed with trapping dirt & moisture in mind.



So I recycled some insulating foam and cut that up so that it would fill the gaps on both sides.







Then I covered the whole lot in fibreglass matting.



Note:
This was a single layer of matting and extra layers were added later.

In some cases, if I'd used mesh & fibreglass on one side, I simply added filler on the other side.





In other cases, I put fibreglass matting on both sides of the repair.

As this work is very messy / sticky, there are not as many photos of the process as I usually post.

So I'll end this section with a couple of random shots.

The first is one of my resin mixing containers, recycled milk cartons.



The final one is a tip I'd picked up from another build about masking off the handles of my brush & roller.



This ready did speed up the cleaning up operation.

You can see the way the arches now look in the next post...
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